Skip to main content

Full text of "The Rewakantha directory"

See other formats




« 






<5 



^ 




\R 



/ 



A/ 






.*V -if 



>f 






/ 1 ."> 



iv'^-rftv- 






I 0- 



g us ie ■flP* 






7' 



A.* -r ,• 'It t "*c i'0-tt <-\ 4 r 



//•, 



>.,...> 



4*4*1 We ^/ { c#H W^ hi* *ilV* 



THE 

EWAKANTHA giRECTORI 

( Revised Edition ). 

VOL. I. 

COMPILED BY 

Ladhabhai Warji Parmar, 

RETIRED DEPUTY POLITICAL AGENT. 



( All rights reserved. ) 



RAJKOT. 

PRINTED BY 

CHAKUBHAI VAKHATCHAND & DHANJI RAMJI 

PROPRIETORS OF THE 

y&BMAR PRESS. 

1922. 
Price Rs. 15. 

i 

C For both volumes.) * 

■( 



V 



\ 



i>c 








Qy" 








, ^ «4 


*\ 


» 4 f M- 


©• 


1/. t 





-*4i< 



-*~S*®P'.JeMH~» 



THEIR MAJESTIES THE KING EMPEROR 
AND QUEEN EMPRESS. 



*-H^< 



®rfr<- 



<T' 







\ 



r 

\ 

J 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 



mSsA 



\ 



1i* 



*- 



s 

if 



rat<"*p 





SIR GEORGE LLOYD 
Governor of Bombay 




Mr. W. F. HUDSON, I.C.S 
CLE., Political Agent 
Rewa-Kantha (191$) 



Mr C. A. B^YTS, I.CS., 

O.B.E., Political Agent 

Rewa-Kantha (1922) 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 









f 

\ 

J 



I 






AJ 



TO 

THE HON'BLE MR. P. G. PRATT, Las* 

COMMISSIONER, NORTHERN DIVISION, BOMBA.T TKItSLWBSPg- 

THIS WORK 

13 RESFBCTFCLLY DEDICATED BT 

THE COMPILER 

WITH KINB PEBMISSION 

IN TOO* OF 

GRATBFCL B8MEMBBANCE OF PIB80NAL JfclNBHBgg 

WHIL1 IN SERVICE IN REWA KaNTEA 

AND 

AS A HUMBLE TBIBUTE OF GENERAL IESPBC* AMD S«aU9f' 

ESPECIALLY 

FOB SYMPATHETIC AND ZEALOUS EXEBTI0N5 UNDEB'Hra^ 

FOB 
THE WELFARE OF THE PEOPLE. 




Mr. LADHABHAI HARJI PARMAR, 

Compiler of the Rewa-Kantha Directory 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 



PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITIOKf. 

Among the Political Agencies in the Northern Division 
of the Bombay Presidency, tha Province of Rawikanbha is, 
in importance, nexb to Kathiawar. It is contiguous to and 
almost sarrouoda t'ae British District of the Pauch Mihala. 
It is therefore, for convenience, placed under the immediate 
control and supervision of the Collector of this District, who 
is ex officio Political Agent for the States comprised in the 
Rewakantha Agenoy. Bab these States, constituting what 
in official language is called " Foreign Territory," lie outside 
the scope of British Indian Laws and Regulations, unless 
they are specially extended and applied. With regard to 
the territories under the rule of the larger Chiefs, ^tha 
Political Agent has to perform certain diplomatic functions 
in the shape of advice and general supervision, while 
in the case of the petty Chiefs, ' the Agenoy has not 
only to administer civil and criminal jusbiee, bub to procecfc 
life and proporty and to keep law and order. The Political 
Agent has also (I) to adjudicate on iatersfcatal disputes, (2) 
to deal with questions of succession, (3) to fix maintenance 
of families acaordiug to their respaetive status, and above 
all, (4) to guide all states in the path of progress, so that 
they may nob lag behind buo keep pace with thy adjoining 
British Districts and the "rest of the Enpire. Waen a 
Chief die3, leivinr a minor soa or so.is, it devolva3 upon 
the Agency to take charge of his Sbaoe, t:> administer it 
until the heir comas to years of discretion, and to take the 
opportunity to root out abuses, if any, and introduce re- 
forms and improved mebhois of proselare daring the tem- 
porary management, interfering, however, as libcb as possible 
with the State's autonomic conditions. 

2. It is, therefore, natural to expect that the prjca- 
dure of governing such a territory should.be somewhat 



YI BXWA K1NTHA DIRECTORY. 

different from that obtaining in " Khalsa " British Districts. 
And for this purpose, various orders, circulars, and notifica- 
tions bearing on questions of administration such as institu- 
tion of civil suits, stamps, limitation, and other cognate 
matters of general importance are, from time to time, issued 
both by Government and the Agency, to suit local condi- 
tions and circumstance?. But the publication of these orders, 
from the nature of the special circumstances, is local and not 
through the medium of the Official Gazette, except in a 
few instances; it is therefore very difficult for an outsider 
or ordinary person to understand and to know what rule is 
actually in force on a particular subject. For, the rules and 
orders 9 when issued, are at the most posted at Kacheries or 
in other conspicuous places, and are, after a time, naturally 
replaced by others in the usual course, and are thus con- 
signed to oblivion, so far as th9 general public is concerned. 

8. In Kathiawar, such rules and regulations are 
promulgated to the public through the Kathiawar Agency 
Gazette, and yet for facility of reference, it has become 
accessary to publish a series of volumes -called tho " Kathia- 
war Directory," which are found very valuable to Govern- 
ment officers and the public in general. In the Mahikantha, 
an attempt, though feeble, was made some years ago by a 
local Pleader to compile the regulations then in force in a 
vernacular € Manuai " 9 but subsequent additions and altera- 
tions have not seen similar light. No such attempt has 
ever been made in the Rewakantha Agency, and officer* 
have often to wade through the files of several years in 
order to find out a rule or order passed on particular ques- 
tions under consideration, an operation both slow and 
troublesome. A fortiori, the difficulties of a private person 
in getting at a rule on a matter in which he is concerned 
can well be imagined. There is no local book or Gazett8 
to which he can refer to supply the information he requires, 
and he must needs depend en the knowledge or records of 



rREFACE. Xl% 

local pleaders or mukhtyars, which are frequently very scanty 
and unauthoritative. 

4. The Hon'ble Mr. Naylor's Manual of 1892, and 
Mr. Macpherson's work entitled " British Enactmsnts in 
force in Native States v published in 1900, supply to some 
extent information on important subjects so far as it con* 
cerns Rewakantha, but these books ara too costly to be 
available to the ordinary public. The former is not upto 
date, having been published more than ten years ago, and the 
latter is little known in these parts. I have therefore 
endeavoured to meet the general want by the compilation of 
all useful Circulars and Notifications in force in the Agency, 
and the opportunity has beeu taken to include a short 
acoount of the Province and principal Stat9s comprized in it, 
and aho a transcript from Aitchison's Volume o£ the 
Treaties and Engagements entered into by th9 Chiefs, on 
which the whole polity of Rewakmtha is based. General 
information relating to schools, dispensaries, roads, &o., and 
wherever possible, special important circulars and rules pro- 
mulgated by the Native States have been added, to make 
the work as complete and self-contained as practicable. The 
work is divided into four Sections as follows :— 

I. A short Account of Rewakantha and the States, 
general information and statistics. 

II. Treaties and Engagements. 

III. Rules and Regulations contained in Circulars 
and Notifications of the Agency and Govern- 
ment (mostly arranged in chro lologicil order), 
precede 1 by an explanatory Memorandum on 
procedure. 

IV. Rules and Regulations contained in important) 

Circulars and Notification of the Native States. 

5. In order that this " Directory " taay be useful to 
all concerned and not merely to those acquainted with either 



Till BEWA KANTH A DIRECTORY. 

the English or the Gujarati language, all information is 
given in English as well as in Gujarati, following the linefr 
of the Kathiawar Directory (with tbe exception of Section 
IV). It is embodied in two volumes. The first volume 
consists of sections I, II and III (English). The Gujarati 
portion of Section III and Section IV form Volume II. It 
must be noted that a collection of the rules and regulations 
of the Native States is the first attempt of its kind ; neither 
the Kathiawar Directory nor the Mahikantha Manual con- 
tain any rules of the States. 

6. In all important matters, the States of Rewakantha 
follow the spirit of the provisions of the British Laws and 
Regulations. The British Penal Code, the Criminal Proce- 
dure Code, the Civil Procedure Code, the Contract Act, the 
Evidence Act, the Opium and Abkari Laws are generally 
the guides for their Courts as well as the Courts of British 
Districts. In some cases they have been formally applied, 
while in others their application is generally understood. The 
local circumstances of the various states being however in 
some respects dissimilar from those of British Districts, they 
have to be worked according to local requirements. The 
points on which the stits rules generally differ are thosa 
relating to revenue management, stamps, limitation, registr- 
ation, export and import tariffs &c. 

7. The Rajpipla State possesses a Gujarati Manual 
embodying a collection of rules promulgated upto 1889. It 
is not therefore considered desirable to reproduce them in 
this Directory. Those promulgated since by the State, and 
the rules at present in force in the other principal States 
are published herein with the double object of making the 
people acquainted with them with facility, aad of enabling 
the states inter se to compare notes as to the procedure 
obtaining in their neighbours' territories, with a view to 
amend their own laws, siould it ba deem >d necessary or 
advisable, by the light o£ ths experience of oth3rs. 



PREFACE. IX 

8. The opportunity has been taken to commemorate 
the memory of Dr. J. Pollen, L. L. D., I. C. S., C. I. E., 
who held the office ot Political Agent, R9wa Kantba, from 
1893 to 1896, by inserting hi3 Hkeness in the front page. 
Rewa Kantha has n >t seen a more sympathetic and popular 
Political Agent, and the association of his memory with a 
work of such permanent usefulness seems to be appropriate. 

9. An alphabetical index and a map of the Province 
showirg the several states and divisions are also added. la 
short no pains have been spared to make the compilation aa 
useful and instructive a hook of reference as possible. This 
being however the first work of its kind for this Agency, it 
is hoped that any short comings or defects, which may be 
found therein, will be overlooked 

10. I am deeply indebted to G, Carmichael Esq re., 
I. C. S., at present Political Agent, Rewakantha, for his 
kind advice and instructions, and for the facility given to me 
in preparing materials for these Volumes. Mr. Campbell's 
Gazetteer for Rewakantha has supplied valuable information 
fot the historical portion of the woik. 

11. In conclusion, 1 desire to record that my acknow* 
ledgments are due to Messrs. Vashram Pitamber and Ramji 
J. Chohan for the valuable assistance they have cheerfully 
rendered to me in makirg translations, correcting proofs, &o. 

1 g ()H | LADHABHAI H. Parmar. 




Opinions Expressed 

about tbe 1st Edition of the Rewakantha Directory, 

Dr* J* Pollen, I. C. &, late Political Agent, Rewa 
kantha wrote, (19th October 1902 ), 

I think your idea of a Directory for Rewaksntha an 
excellent one and your preface is clear and businesslike,. 

Dr # J. Pollen -(18-2-4), 

I congratulate you on the admirable arrangement of 
the work and can realise how useful it will prove not only 
to the Princes themselves, but to all future Political Agents. 
You certainly have brought to bear on the work great 
industry and unmistakeable ability, and you have deserved 
well of the Rewakantha. 

Sir Steyning Edgerley, Chief Secretary to Govt, (9-1-4), 

The volume is nnely arranged, and a book of the kind 
should, I am sure, be of great use to those who have work 
in the Rewakantha, 

Sir Frederick Lely, (9-1-1904), 

So far as I have been able to test it, it does you great 
credit and will I am sure be of great public use. 

Mr* E. Lawrence, I. Q S., Commissioner, N. D. 
( 7-1-4 ), 

The Directory seems interesting and should prove very 
useful to officers, and I must congratulate you on your 
industry and enterprize in compiling it. 

Colonel W. P. Kennedy, Agent to the Governor, 
Kathiawar ( 2-4-4 ), * 



XII BKWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

It is very well got up and should ba a useful reference 
book for the Rewakantha Agency. 

H. Ht the Maharaja of Rajpipla, ( 101 4 ), 

Ucur valuable book would be an ornament to any 
library, and it would be impossible to overstate its importance 
to every one having any thing to do with Rewakantha. 

Khan Bahadur Dhanjishah Edaiji, Diwan of 
Rajpipla, (23-12-1903), wrote as follows, 

'- You are pleased to call it a plain copy, but it is as 
handsomely bound and got up as any presentation copy need 
be. The outside is, however, the least of the book's merits. 
All having anything to do with tin affiurs of the Agency 
will owe you a deep debt of gratitude for your having placed 
within their reach such a valuable storehouse of useful infor- 
mation, much of which was not formerly within public 
knowledge, and which, though known in, a vague sort of way, 
was difficult to get at. I agree with you that the duties of 
a hardworked peripatetic officer are not exactly of a character 
to lend themselves to work of a literary character. Handi- 
capped as you were with such duties, however, you have 
succeeded in writing a book which is not, only useful and 
informing in the highest degree, but which does not lack 
even literary merit. The perspicacity of style and the scientific 
arrangement of facts and subjects which characterize the 
work are not the least of the book's marits. Altogether you 
have brought out a most valuable work, and I beg to leader 
you my most cordial congratulations on your success. 

It now strikes me the name of the book hardly does 
it justice. A Directory— as Directories go — is of ephemeral 
value, good only for a year or so, and then to be thrown 
aside for another year's Directory. This book has rather a 
permanent value, and although some parts of it may require 
supplementing from time to time, mi?ch ot it will ba good 



opinions. Sin 

for all time. a The Rewakantha Handbook" or some such 
titlo would probably have done greater justice to the 
contents of the book/ 7 

Mr* Cooverji Ooyaji, the venerable retired Diwan of 
Dhrangadhra, says, (1-1-4), 

tl It is evidently a most useful work, peculiarly valuable 
to all who have relations with, and require information 
regarding the province. Beyond your anxious and onerous 
official labours, that you should have found time and atten- 
tion for the production of such a voluminous work testifies 
eloquently to your ability, industry and praiseworthy desire 
to be useful to the public. Your sterling qualities of head 
and heart have naturally elevated you to your present high 
position, and under Divine Providence the future appears 
pregnant with still brighter promises." 




PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION. 

0^. HUM ^P 

The first edition of the Rewa Kantha Directory was 
published iti 1903-04, and the lapse of a decade since 
rendered the issue of a second edition necessary and desirable, 
both owing to the changed circumstances and exhaustion of 
the copies of the fi:3t edition. A proposal w*s therefore 
submitted in September 1914 to the Political Agent, Rewa 
Kantha, for the issue of a second edition revised upto date, 
and it was approved by him as well as by the States of 
the Agency, and also received the consent of Government) in 

November 1915, the States* 
agreeing to subscribe a certain 
number of copies through the 
Agency. The work of calling 
for and collecting materials . 
then commenced, and I had 
to pay a visit to Godhra for 
the purpose and stay there 
for more than a month, in 

order to collect the latest orders and information from the 

Agency records, 

2. The outbreak of the Great European War, however, 
which afterwards expanded its wings to all continent* 
and countries of the world, distracted the attention of all 
concerned and retarded the work of collection. After the 
cessation of hostilities in 1918, the dire famine and the 
squally pernicious outbreak of influenza and plague, which 
immediately followed, made their effects felt in this work as 
well as others, and it was not until the close of 1921 
that I could obtain and collect all the materials necessary 
lor revision, and the work of printing was actually taken 
io hand in November 1921. 



Rajpipla 


100 


Chhota Udcpur 


.... 10 


Baria 


50 


Lunavada 


25 


Balasinor 


.... 20 


Sunth 


.... 20 


Kadana 


6 


Bhadarwa 


4 


Sanjeli 


2 


Umetha 


2 


Jambughoda 


1 


Sankheda Mewas ... 


30 


Pandu Mewas 


27 


Agency offices 


7 



Total 304 



XVI bewa kantha bi rectory, 

3. In the meantime I had to proceed to Nandod on 
the invitatioa of the Darbar for a stay of about two 
months to supervise the compilation and classification of 
the numerous rules and orders of that premier State of 
Rewaksntha, the administration of which had previously 
been in the hands of Government Officers for a long tim e 
and hal since been under the rule of enlightened Princes,, 
aided by experienced Diwans in the person of K. B. Dhanjishah 
Edalji Kothawala and Sardar P. H. Dastur. The rules 
and regulations issued by the State from time t3 time to 
suit the changing circumstances had accumulated very much. 
Therefore the task of weeding out the old and obsolete 
from a mass of unwieldy collection, and selecting the really 
useful ones for the purpose of publication in the Directory 
and for departmental guidanea was indeed very arduous 
and tiresome, but I am glad to acknowledge that the 
ungrudging help rendered to me by Mr. Ch*ndulal Midhavlal 
Mehta, whose services were placed by the State at my 
disposal along with a clerical staff, facilitated the task to 
eome extent. The requisite information iron Chhota 
Udepur, Balasioor and other States came very late and 
after repeated reminders, and this also partially accounts 
for the delay in bringing out the book. 

4. The present edition follows the lines of the 
previous one, iu the main, with some special features of 
material importance. The former edition was bi-lugual f 
English and Gujarati. In the present edition Vol. I contains 
ail matter in English, while the second will contain all 
matter in Gujarati. The former, in addition to general and 
special information, includes Government Rules and Regu- 
lations, while Vol. II includes, besides the general account 
and statistics, tho rules and regulations of the several 
principal States o£ the Agency. 

5. The present edition includes, for the first time, a. 
separate chapter on Education, in which particulars of the 



PREFACE TO TH1 MCOKD lOlTION. i S*R 

origin and progress of education in the States of Re *a 
Kantha (which h a fundamental branch of the almintstra* 
tion in these days) are given with soma degree of precision. 

6 Another feaure of far reaching impirtancs is the 
insertion of a detailed account of the Political ft forms 
recently inaugurated in the government of the Indian 
Enpire. Section LI of the present Volume I deals with the 
subject in rather an exhaustive and interesting way. A 
question might arise as to why in a Directory relating to 
the Province of Rewa Kantha, the new Political R f>rms 
should find so p-ominent a place. The answer is, thtt the 
Ruling Princes of the she princ pal Stite^ of tie Agency 
are, in virtue of their hnreditnry position, Member* of the 
new Imperial Chamber of Princes at Dalhi, and that A 
seventh Chief, also of this Agency, i. e. the Thak r of 
Kalana, ha* been eleoted by the smaller States of the 
Northern Part of the Bombay Presidency as a Representative 
Mamber of that August Chamber, and this is no common 
honour to the Chiet himself or the Agency. The States and 
their subjects have therefore a pergonal and intimate interest 
in the new regime. 

7. Political Reforms is also a subject, which is now 
seriously agitating the minds of the present generation i. e. 
princes and peas*nt% high and low, rich and poor, the town 
people and the villagers, and they nwk the turning point 
in tin history of this ancient and conservative lml and 
make a striking depnrture in the method of governing mil- 
lions of human beings somewhat on the western and I. The 
reform* introduced in the Government of Brinish I dii, by 
whion the i-..fl-ieme of public voice will oe effectually tele in 
its future ad nidistraMon, are sure to affect indireo 1/ the 
government of the Native States as well to a more or less 
degree, and the establishment of* tha Cnambsr of Pnujes 
under, the Pre«idenc/ of H. E. the Viceroy for the joint 
deliberation and disctuaon, in solemn conclave! of interstettal 
c 



$?in BSWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

questions as well as internal matters affecting the public 
weal of the States, is a measure of wide political significance, 
And is an augury for the future better government of the 
territories under the care of Native Princes, and Caiefs, which 
comprize one third of the Indian Empire. 

8. Soma of the larger Princes, following the noble 
example o£ the British Government, have introduced Repre- 
sentative Institutions in their states, and taken the elected 
delegates of their people into their counsels, in order to 
mould their administrations so as to oat rm to the popular 
will, as far as possible. The States of Baroda, Gwahor, 
Bixaner, Alwar, Jnalawar, Bhavnagar and others in the 
Nprbnern part of India, and Mysore, Travancore, Cochin* 
Pudukota and others in the Southern part may be mentioned 
as the leading springs in the present movement of the 
popular voice being recognized as an important and necessary 
factor in the governing machinery, and it is hoped that 
other states of equal or lesser importance in these parts will 
be induced to follow suit in the near future. 

9. To use tae very pregnant words ot* H. E. the Viceroy 
at a receat sitting of the lamoer of Princes, 

•' Events are compelling the study of the working of 
4t forms of Government other than your own and the effects 
" which certain forces seeaa almost inevitably to produce 
51 on the beliefs, tUe feelings an J the aspirations of the 
11 great masses of maukind. 

"That, Your Highnesses, brings us to reform in 
41 another of its aspects, refo m as an answer to the 
"awakened ojnsobnce o£ the people. These forces can 
" not be bidden to halt. Xney must be faced and dealt 
" with. 1 kuow that you have already reflected deep 
" upon them f and that they will continue to engage your 
41 attention so that when they present themselves to you 
u for solution, you may know the answer you wisu to 
41 make, x x x x The time and the place and the 



TRBFAOE TO THE SECOHD IDITIOK. XIX 

11 manner of change, if change there is to be, are in your 
M bands. But the foroes with wiioh you have to deaf/ 
" are live forces. They ne^d and they deserve careful 
" study, wherever they are at work. May you be guided 
" to d^al with them prudently and well " 

10. In this connection I am tempted to quote here 

the very wife and weighty address of H. H. the Maharaja 

of Alwar, delivered recently on the occasion of H. E. the 

Viceroy's visit to Alwar. His Highness, after alluding to 

the visit of H. R, H. The Prince of Wales, paid :— 

FUTURE OF INDIAN STATES. 

" I have learnt to believe in my brief experience that 
'* administration can only be carried on by means of both hands, 
•'one exercising generosity and liberality, and the other using 
'' firmness and strength. Administration cannot be carried 
" on by the one, it certainly is impossible to carry it without 
€< the other. 

41 The question of the Chamber of Princes, and parti- 
M cularly that of the future of the Indian States, is one of 
14 such magnitude that I do not feel competent to encompass 
•' it ia the course of an after dinner oration, bub after all 
u truths are really simple. If the ideal is to merge our 
" individual destiny into tidal waves, or to be swerved into 
l<f the vortex of humdrum idealism of one pattern and shape, 
" then I have grave doubts of the future, and much room 
11 for speculation and misgiving. 

" But I do not believe that this can be our goal, for 
" variety in unity is the law of nature. My goal is the 
" United States of India, where every Province and every 
u State working its own de3tiny, in a?cord*nca with its owa 
u environment, its own t-adition, history and religion, will 
"combine together for higher and imperial .purposes, each 
11 subscribing its little quota of knowledge and experience, in 
" a labour of bv6 freely given for a higher and nobler cause. 



IX JUBWA KAWtHA DIRECTORY. 

u I have somehow learnt to believe that the destiny of the 
* West as rep'esentel by Bri'aij bas b^n brought int> 
^contact with the E\st as represented by India by no mara 
11 chance or any haptnzird circutmtanea. Tie eternal triii- 
u tion of India has be*n to io>k to the inaer things of life, 
'•to be introspective acd to fathom the secrets o: G>d anl 
"Life. Seli-realisntion, in other words, has been the g>al of 
u the East. The West on the other hand has lookeJ to the 
•'outside world, to conquer nature. E*ch has a dafiaifce aim 
11 acd a great deal to give to the other. Slavish imitation is 
"death, but assimilation of the best when the root3 are 
$i firmly imbeded in one's own soil is life. The miterialisin 
€l of the West cannot survive by itself any more than the 
a spirituality of the East can be put into practice without 
" the union of both. 

THE DESTINY INDIA. HIS TO FULFIL. 

" I believe that a higher destiny hai will 3d that the 
11 two nations which have baen brought together are not 
11 going to pait asunder until a higher civilisation has been 
"evolved, where the spirituality o£ the E*st, mingling with 
* f the sciences and the material progreses of the West, will 
" bring the millenium for the world. It is only th m that? 
"equality will come, it is then that we can mutually shake 
" the hand of friendship and serve each oblier, carabine toother 
"and make an Empire that may wall ba the envy of history 
"and the world. 

11 This is the destiny in my estimation that India has 
u to fulfil. This according to my idails is bar highest 
a Swaraj. Oars is the only hand that hsldi tlio r j >a thit 
" drags us on. Awaka aai realisa aai tii9 trufch coaas/* 

The sentiments thus expressed by a highly enlighoeaed 
and progressive .Prince of India are full of sagaaiou* gailaaod 

and indicate a noble purpose. 

< 

11. His Highness might as well have addad, by way 
of concrete illustration, that the benevolent autocracy of the 



MBFACB TO THE SECOND EDITIOK. 

Ruler of the E*st would perhaps be raaoh improved by 
assi nihting the democratic spirit of tha Wast ia the adminis- 
tration and in the expenditure of the public revenues of the* 
state, that if the Monarch of the Eist would allow himself t<K 
be circumscribed, aided and supported! by the bonds of the 
people's attachment and voice, the Godliness of the King -ho ad 
would be all the more enhanced and revered by thfr 
hefcrts of his people, just as King Ramchandra of AyoJhya 
in the olden days commanded the reverence and love of the 
people of India, and in our days His Imperial Majasty 
the King Emperor commands the respect and allegiance of 
all the peoples throughout the lengths and breadths of all th» 
continents of this mighty, and far flung Enpire, comprising^ 
as it does, numerous nationalities of different creeds, different 
origins and different inclinations, such as no monarch has ever 
done beforoe since the dawn of history. All this is due to 
constitutional government, changing its scope as circumstanoes 
change. Political Reforms is the pivot and key of all organized 
governments, but must be introduced, in a graduated scale, 
as the surrounding ciroumstances and environments indicate 

fitness and opportunity for a fresh move. Stagnation should 
be avoided, as much as a rapid onrush. 

f| Progressive realization of responsible Government '* 

has been the motto of Great Britain for the last four hundred 

years; it has been literally followed by the Dominions, all of 

recent growth, and it has been nobly prescribed and brought 

into force fjr conservative India by the British Statesmen 

and Parliament. Therefore the Native Rulers of India might 

very well adopt it for their own respective States with 

considerable advantage to themselves, their ancient Houses 
and their subjects. 

12. Therefore the insertion of a Section on this 
important subject in the revised edition as throwing light on 
the current problems affecting the States and their people 
apd the neighbouring British Districts of Panch Mahals, 
burst and Broach* w&ere the non-co-operation movement haa 



XXII REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

been very active of late, has been considered as opportune 
and desirable in the public interest 

13. The third spe3ial feature in the present edition, 
which deserves mention, is the improvement made in th§ 
publication of the Government Rules and Regulations. Instead 
of their being arranged in chronological order, as in 
the first edition, they have been grouped together according 
to subjects and arranged alphabetically w^h head lines to 
show the purport of the order or rule. For the purpose of 
reference this improvement is calculated to be very useful. 
The head lines are reproduced in a collective form and 
form part of the index, which precedes the text of the 
Directory. 

14. The fourth feature of special importance is the * 
insertion o£ the likenesses of the principal Princes and Chiefs 
of RewaKantha, along with those of Their August Majesties the 
Emperor and Empress, H. R. H the Prince of Wales and 
High officers of Government having correction with the 
administration of the Province. They are likely to adorn 
the rough and tough matter — o£— fact particulars of the 
Directory with pleasing portraits of the Rulers who have 
the powftr of making history in the onward march of this 
progressive age in their respective spheres of influence. 

?5. Finally the inclusion of several blank pages at 
the end of the volume for insertion of addenda and corri- 
genda from tim8 to time provides for future needs, and 
ought to be useful to those who may care to take a per- 
sonal interest in the matter. The map of ths Agency has 
also been revised and brought upto date. 

16. In short uo pains have besn spared, r*or expense 
grudged, to make the Directory as instructive and attractive 
as possible ia its own humble way, having regard to the 
present circumstances and needs. The cost of paper, printing 
and binding has been more than doubled, and yet the price 
of the two volumes of the new edition, which, moreover, are 



PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION. XXIII 

larger in size and contents than the first edition, is pub 
down only 50 per cent higher than the previous edition. The 
work has been a labour oE love to me, as it relates to a 
Province usually interesting in its own way, but which 
ipecially appeals to me on account of my having had 
official connection with it ia the hsb decade of my public 
service before retirement in 19 10, Such works have hitherto 
been generally carried out by pars3ns in active service, who 
naturally receive prompt attention and compliance with 
requests for information, but for one who ha3 thrown off 
the oflisial garb long since and has not been in touch 'with 
local current events, the work of collecting and compiling such 
information as is required for a Directory of this kind mu3b 
naturally be comparatively more laborious 

17. Notwithstandibg this drawback, the seven years 
interval, which has elapsed since the inception of the idea 
of a revised Directory, has been I believe contributory to 
the proper fulfilment of a much cherished desire on my 
part to be useful to the Princes and people of the land I 
love and admire, and to the production of a really useful 
work of reference and guidance for those who have anything 
to do with the Province or who take an interest in its affairs, 
both now and in the future. If this work of my retired 
life is found to meet a publio want and to satisfy the req lira- 
aunts of the present times, I shall consider that the days 
of my retirement have been well spent for the public good, 
thouga not in a remunerative way. 

In conclusion I beg to tender my hearty thanks 
to Mr. Shankarlal Jatashankar Vaishnav of Rajkot for the 
prompt and ready assistance which hi gava me in compiling 
tile statistics, examining the Gujarati translations and correcting 
the proofs of the Directory. 



i- 



Rajkot. 

LADHABHAI H. Paimak. 
10th April 1922. 



THE 



REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY.' 



Yolume L 



CONTENTS* 

Pag*u 
Portrait! as per Eat attached. 

Preface to the iirst edition , v to X 

Opinions about Do: XI— xrr 

Preface to the second edition . Xv-XXIY 

Contents <fe Indexes XXV-XXXIX 

Section I. — Account of Rewa Kantha and th% States 

comprized in it * 1 to 154 

II % — Political Iteforma and General information 155—282 



!» 



III.— Treaties & Engagements 283—368 



„ IV.— Rules <t Regulations 369—700 

„ V. — Blank pages Reserved for Addenda & 

Corrigenda ...*.......... .. 701—72* 

Map of the Rewa Kantha Agency ....at end? 



l3 -tS0638. 



List of Portraits. 

1. Thair Imperial Majesties the King Emperor, Empress & the 

Prince of Wales. mmm „ 9 i 

2. Their Excellencies the Viceroy & Governor & Political Agents, ii 

3. Mr. Ladhabhai Harji Parmar, Compiler o£ the Directory. iii 

4. Captain H. H. Maharana Shri Vijaysinhji, Maharaja o£ Rajpipla. 31 

5. Maharaol Shri Fatehsinhji, Rajaji of Chhota Udepur* .«* 39 

6. Captain H. H. Maharaol Shri Sir Ranjitsinb ji, K» C. S. I., 

Rajaji of Baiia. ..♦ ... 43 

7. Do Do in Military Uniform .. % ... 44 

8. The new Palace at Baria, •,„ ,.* 45 

9. H. H. Maharana Shri Sir Wakhatsinbji, K. C. I. E., 

Rajaji of Lunavada ,.. ..« 4$ 

10. Maharana Shri Jorawarsinhji, Rajaji of Sunth. ,.* ... 53 

11. Rana Shri Chhatrasalji, Thakor of Kadana. •.» ... 5T 

12. Meherban Rana Ranjitsinhji, Thakor of Bhadarwa. ..♦ 59 

13. Meherban Pushpsinhji, Thakor of Sanjeli. „•• ... 63 

14. Azani Ganpatsinhji, Thakor of Umetha. ... ..♦ 65 

15. Azam Ranjitsinhji, Thakor of Jambughoda. ... ..- 6T 

16. Azam Khashalsinhji, Thakor of Mandwa. ,.* ... 71 

17. Azam Kesarkhan, Thakor of Vajiria. ... ... 73 




XXIX 



Section I* 

REWA KANTHA AGENCY. 

1. Accouat oE Rewa Kantha 

i. Short account of principal States :— 

Rajpipla. 

Chhota Udepur. 

Baria 

Lunavada ••• ••• 

Balasinor 
Suntb 

Kadana ••• •*' 

Bhadarwa 

Sanjeli 

Umetha 

N arukot-J ambughoda 

Other petty States Mandwa, Vajiria &c. 

Sankheda Mewas 

Pandu Mewa3 

Laud Administration 

Local Funds 

Education 

Agency Courts and their powers 

Classes o£ States and t;heir powers 

Detailed particulars of States 

Mode of addressing Chiefs 

Schools in Rewa Kantha 

Hospitals & Dispensaries 

Post, Telegraph <$• Telephone Offices 

Railways 

Roads 

Political Agents from 1825 to date 

Do ... 



3. 
4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
,12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16. 



Ruling Chiefs from Do. 



33 
39 
43 
49 
51 
53 

n 

59 
63 
65 
67 
71 
73 
71 
81 
86 
, 89 
98 
100 
101 
1M 
, 126 
. 135 
, 137 
. 139 
. 141 
. 147 
. 15* 



XXX 



Section II 



POLITICAL REFORMS & GENERAL INFORMATION. 

1. Short account o£ the genesis of Political Reforms.., ... 157 

2. Indian Councils Act 1862 ... ... ..•'161 

& '"" » 1892 ... . „ 

4. Morley Minto Reforms ... ... ... 162 

5. The Reform Act of 1919 ... ... ... 163 

6. Provincial Governments Autonomy ... ... ... 169 

7. Royal Instructions to Governors, 1920 ... ... ... 175 

8. c „ to the Viceroy, March 1921 ... ... ... 179 

9. \, Message through the Prince of Wales, November 1921 183 

10. Inauguration of the Chamber of Princes: — 

(a) Royal Proclamation ... ... ... 185 

(b) The Viceroy Lord Chelmsford's Review ... 188 

(c) The Duke of Connaught's speech ... ... 196 

(d) The replies of the Princes ... ... ... 201 

(<?) The Chamber's Constitution ... ... ... 200 

(/) H. E. Lord Reading's speech ... ... 221 

11. Inauguration of the Couucil of State and the Imperial 

Legislative Assembly: — 

(a) The Viceroy Lord Chelmsford's speech ... 227 

(6) The Royal Message & the Duke's speech ... 237 

12. Previous Royal Proclamations : — 

(a) Queea Victoria's Proclamation of 1858 ... 24? 

(b) Do Do 1876-77 ... 250 
(o) King Edward's Message of 1903 ... ... 253 

(d) „ Proclamation of 1908... ... 255 

(V) King George's Proclamation of 1911 .... ... 259 

13. British Territory in the Indian Empire ... ... ... 260 

14. Native State Territory in Do ... ... ... 261 

15. Particulars of principal States in India ... ... ... 263 

16. Sardars qO Gujarat ... ... ... 270 

17. Table of Salutes to Royalties & High Officers ... ... 273 

18. Salutes to Indian Princes .. # ... .,.275 

19. Postal Tariff ... ... ... 279 

20. Telegraph Tariff 281 





April 


1840 




Reply 


from the Raja 


of Rajpipla 


>t 






„ Chbota Udepur 


35 






M Baria 


)» 






„ Lunawada 


99 






„ Sunth ... 


5> 




Thakor of Bhadarwa 


35 






„ Wankaner 



XXXI 

Section 111, 

TREATIES AND ENGAGEMENTS. 
Prevention of Satu — 

Note from A. Remington Esq. lo all principal Chiefs dated 3rd 

• «.» ••• 285 

286 

•»• 28S 

• ... «•• 28? 
28? 

... *•» 287 

• • •• ••• 2<JQ 

288 

Opium.— 

Agreement of the States, 1882.., ... ... ... 288 

n of the Thakors of Mewas ( including Bhadarwa 
and Umetha ) handing over management of 
opium arrangements to Government .., ... 289 

„ of all States, 1896-97 ... 290 

Abkari.— 

Agreement by the Thakors oE Mewas ( including Bhadarwa 
and Umetha ) handing over management of 
abkari arrangements to Government, 1891-92 ,,. 293 

Adoption.— " 

Sanaa granted by the Viceroy to Rajpipla in 1862 *,. 297 

„ to 2nd Class Chiefs in 1890 ... ... ... 297 

Rajpipla* 

Parwana from the Gaekwar to Svunvar Pratapsing of 

Rajpipla in 1810 ... 298 

Agreement of Verisalji dated 11th October 1821... «... 300 

„ „ 2Gth February 1823 ... ... ,.. 301 



XXXII 

Grant o£ yearly allowance by Eaja Veiisalji to Baui Snraj 

Kunvar, 20th February 1823 ... ... ... 301 

Agreement •£ Verisalji dated 26th November 1823 ... 302 

„ „ 28th November 1852 ... ... ...305 

Agreement o£ Coovera Vasava of Sagbara dated 31st .January 

1822 ... ... ... m)0 

„ „ 8th April 1825 ... -1'J 

Cikota Udepur. — 

Agreement o£ the Raja dated 21st November 1822. ... 313 

„ „ 28th June 1822 ... 314 

Letter from the Gaekwar to the Eaja daied 31st October 1822 31S 
Letter from Mr. Willoughby to the Eaja daied 11th December 

1822 ... ••» ••• 31S 

Uarta.— 

Agreement between the British Government and ftaja of 

Baria dated March 1824 ... ... ... 316 

„ February 1824 ... ... ... ^18 

„ „ October 1892 ... ... ... 31 * 

Ztunawada. — 

Engagement from British Government to the Chkf of Luwawada, 

of 27th September 1803 ... ... ... 322 

„ „ 14th November 1803 ... .,. ... „ 

Agreement by the Eaja, 1813 ... ... ... 324 

Lunatcada and Sunth. — 

Agreement with Mansing Patankar of Ktth August 181!^ ... 325. 

Balasinor. — 

Agreement by the Chieftain of Balasinor dated 30th August 

1820 ... 327 

Treaty with the Eaja dated 15th December 1803... ... 328 



XXXIII 

Sankheda Miwas Settlement. 

Fael zamin bond from the Thakors of the Sankheda Mewas 

dated 18th March 1825 ... ... ... 330 

Memorandum from the Gaekwar. ... ... ... 334 

Kanjhari Settlement. — 

Fael zamin bond by the Ihakorof Kanjhari — 15th Ftbrnary 

1826 Ml 

Pandit Mewas Settlement. — 

Security bond of 16 articles by the Thakors of Bhadafffa, 
Umetha, Anghad, Dodka and Baeka along with 
the Chiefs of Mahi Kantha, 1812 ... ... 350 

Ifarukot ( Jambughoda ) Settlement.— 

Petition from the Chief of Narukot and correspondence 

thereon, 1838 ,.. *•• ... 355 

Tribute. 

Treaty between the Gaekwar and British Goyernment dated 

3rd April 1820 „ 266 

Bailicay Agreementi.— 

Baiia agreement dated 17tb July 1891 ... ... ... 36T 

Bajpipla agreement dated 17th March 1896 ... ... 36T 

Lnnavada agreement dated 2nd October 1912 ... ... 368 




Section IY« 

GOVERNMENT RULES & REGULATIONS. 

Explanatory memorandum on procedure... ... ... 371 

Jtules <fe Regulations arranged alphabetically according to subjects, 

Abkari-Note ... ... ... 383 

„ Exemption from duty-Jhaii liquor ... ... „ 

„ . ■ Do Do Nandod liquor ... ... 589 

„ MasaJa liquor, rules for ... ... ... 384 

Administrator General's Act, applied ... ... ... 385 

Alienation Rules ... ... ... 386 

„ Appeals in cases ... ... ... 390 

Anti rabic treatment, Pasteur Institute, Kasauli ... ... 693 

Arms Rules. — No fees from marriage parties ... ... 391 

„ Parwana to be taken for going beyond limits ... ,, 

„ Rules ... ... ... 393 

Boundary disputes, rules regarding ... ... ... 40 j 

Boundaries at rivers — Orders regarding ... ... ... 411 

Border ; Court Rules ... ... ... 415 

Chanod Cases ... ... ... 422 

Chief's absence from his territory to be notified to the Agency... 423 

„ Correspondence with ... ... ...424 

„ to correspond with Government through their officer.* ... 424 

„ Heir apparents ... ... ... 425 

„ Sons of — should be properly educated ... ... 426 

„ Minors — to be sent to Rajkumar College ... ... 427 

„ Visits of chiefs or their Agents to Members of Government. 4 30 

» Sanction to institute suits against ... ... 432 

Civil & Criminal Procedure Codes, Notification regarding ... 433 

Civil Courts Rules ... ... ... 433 

„ Subordinate Courti.—( Appendix A) .♦. #t# 348 



XXXV 

Civil Courts Assistant Political Agents.— ( Appendix B) ...439' 

„ „ Fees on plaints, appeals dkc. — (Appendix 0) ... 43-9 

Civil Courts — Service of summons by Agency Courts ... 458 

„ „ for & by Native State Courts ... 459 

^ „ „ Baroda Courts ... 460 

,, Service of Commissions ... ... ... 461 

„ Execution of decrees of British Courts & vice versa ... 462 

,, Remission of fees on copies of decrees of Baroda Courts ... 465 

„ Proclamation of sale in execution of decrees ... ... 46 6 

Copies — Rules for applications for ... ... ... 47) 

Criminal Courts — Indian Penal ("odes applied ... ... 471 

„ Criminal Procedure Code „ ... ... 433 

„ Powers delegated to Revenue Commissioners ... 472 

„ Conferred on Political Agents ... ... ... 476 

Criminal Law Amendment Act — applied ... ... ...473 

Criminal complaints — no British subject to be arrested by Native 

State Officers in British limits ... ... ... 474 

Criminal Cases — confession of accused persons ... ... 475 

„ Execution of death sentences. ... ... ... 476 

Criminals — maintenance charges of ... ... ... 479 

Deccan Agriculturists Relief Act applied to Mewases ... 479 
Direct correspondence between Mamlatdars and Native State Officers 487 
„ Rules regarding-between Police officers of Agencies & 

Native States ... ... ... 481 

Encumbered Estates Rules ... ... ... 483 

„ Life interest of Talukdars ... ... ... 497 

M written consent of heir required ... ... 498 

European British Subjects — trial of ... ... ... 500 

59 Registration of births, deaths &c. ... ... 502 

„ Christian Marriages ... ... ... 501 

Explosives — Rules ior the transport & importation of ... 505 

„ Substances Act— applied ... —. ..' %.* 508 



xxxvi 

Extradition Rules — orders o! 1873 ... ... ... 509 

„ orders of 1874 ... ... ... 512 

„ treatment o£ accusod persons ... ... ... „ 

, f orders of 1876 ... ... ... 513 

„ amended form of warrant ... ... ... 514 

„ stolen propertly found in the possession of other persons 515 

„ conveyance & maintenance of accused persons ... 516 

„ Revised rules of Government of India- 1904 ... 516 

„ Amendments of 1908 ... ... ... 519 

„ Do of 1912 ... ... ... 520 

, offenders under Criminal Tribes Act, 1915 ... 521 

„ to and from Baroda ... ... ... 523 

„ „ Rajputana ... ... ... 527 

„ of convicts ... ... ... 529 

Famine— Free Trade policy to be observed in times of ... 530 

Fires, extinguishment of ... ... ... 531 

Forest, passes to be given ... ... ... 531 

Forest Department, timber seized for theft of ... ... 532 

Forest, passes to be given by States ... ... ... 533 

Forest Department — Stamps for Timber ... ... ... 534 

Forest Department — Samples of imprints of stamps to be sent ... 534 

Foreign mercenaries, orders regarding ... ... ... 535 

Government Servants — should not assist in writing petitions ... 535 
„ „ not to incur debf s except for supplies received 536 
„ „ Bazar rates should be given for supplies 537 

„ „ not to receive any presents... ... 538 

Impressed carts — Hire of ... ... ... 538 

Land — Sale, mortgage or gift of tribute paying-prohibited ... 539 

Lands of tribute payers— sale prohibited... ... ... 539 

Lands— Bhats, charans and others should not sell ... ... 540 

Laws— Acts of Government of India in force generally in all 

Native States including those in the Revra Kantha Agency 541 

Limitation Law of Kathiawar applied ... ... ,„ 544 



XXXVII 

Limitation Law o£ Kathiawar 1890 

„ in Suits ... ..♦ 

» ,, Appeals ... ... 

„ „ Applications 

Liquor — Exemption from duty on transport from Rajpipla and 
Baria States 

Lunatics — rules for 

Mail robberies, compensation for 

Medical attendance on Chiefs, rules regarding 
,, on Government Servants 

Memorial rules 

Mewas Darbars Hitkarni Sabha 

Mukhtiars, rules regarding 

New villages — near Baroda to be reported 

Opium Notifications and rules 

Pasteur Institute Kasauli 

Petitions to Government-rules regarding 

Plague — Application of the Epidemic Diseases Act ... 

Pleaders Rules 

Pleaders Rules — Ohampertous transactions 

Police Act — applied to the Mewases 

Political suits— Definition of 

Political Appeals — Limitation in 

Political Cases — appearance of pleaders in 

Powers — Delegation of-to the Governor General in Council 

(Foreign Jurisdiction Order in Council) ... «,. 639 

„ Governmaut of India order delegating powers to the 

Governor in Council ... ... ... 641 

Railway Jurisdiction— over lands occupied by Railways ... 642 

» » « ••• ••• ... 644 

Registration Rules ... ... „. 648 

f> does not mean recognition or confirmation by the Agency 657 



«•• 




.«• 


562 


««• 


581 


« • • 


581 


383 


-589 


• ? * 


590 


r «. 


I0i 


««« 


596 


« .. 


598 


C 


598 


6*9 


604 


e«» 


614 


««• 


616 


o«» 


616 


•»•• 


6S3 


«•• 


625 


»•• 


629 


««• 


639 


«•# 


633 


« •• 


634 


#«t 


634 


... 


637 


• ». 


638 



XXXYI1I 

Revenue Recoveries — from other limits ... ... ... 657 

„ Recovery Act applied ... ... ... 658 

„ Commission of money orders on ... ... 659 

„ Decern Agriculturists Relief Act applied for ... 660 

Roads— Repair of village tommunications ... ... 660 

Sanitation — in villges-Instructions regarding ... .., 661 

Service Postage Stamps — to be used for processes .., ... 66 ~ 

Stamps— Rules for refund of ... ... ... 662 

Tifele holders — Badges & miniatures to be worn by ... ... 664 

„ Intimation to be given to local officers ... ... 665 

1'racks — Rules for enforcing responsibility .». ... 666 

Tramways — Rules for construction of — in Native States ... 667 

Transit duties — Orders prohibiting increase in .., ... 669 

„ „ Orders for abolishing ... ... ,.. 671 

Translators, authorized, rules regarding ... ... ... 677 

Troops, March of — State officers for ... ... ..• 678 

Waltar Rules, compensation for robberies... ... ... 679 

Wanta Giras Rules ... ... .. 683 



&~§> 



Mm. 

SECTION I. 

Account of the Province and States 

of fiewa Kantha 

and 

Statistics. 

mm 



THE 



PIARANTHA DIRECTORY. 



B1WA141TIA ♦ 



EEWAKANTHA means literally the district) or provinca 
^^ situated on the banks of the river Rewa, popularly 
called the Narbada. This river is held in high 
veneration among the Hindus, especially in the Bombay 

Presidency. All the states, comprized 
Name derived from its in the provincQ f R QWa Kantha, are 
situation on the river [ 

Rewa or Narbada. not on the banks or the Narbad*. tor 

some of the Northern states i. e. Kada ^a, 
Luriavtjida, Balasinor, and Pandu Mewas, are on the banks 
of the Mahi, but these, having been placed for administrative 
convenience under the supervision of the Political Agent of 
Rewa Kanths, form part of this Agency. In fact, the Rswa 
Kantha Agency comprizes tarritories watered both by the 
Rewa and Mahi rivers. 

2. The Rewa Kantha Agency, as at present 

. . const ituted,extends from 21°-23' to 23°-33' f 

escupion. nor ^ latitude, and 73°-3' to 74°- 18' east 

longitude. The province is net a compact homogeneous terrt- 
tory, but is an irregular long strip of country in the east 
of Gujarat. Its length is 140 miles from South to North, 
and its breadth varies from 10 to 50 miles. The Pandu 
Mewas subdivision, a conglomeration of petty estates of Kolis, 
Barias, Mahomedan, and Rajput chieftains, stretching along 
the banks of the Mahi, forms, as it were, a tail to the main 
body. Rewa Kantha encircles the British Titlukas of Godhra, 



2 REWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

Kilol and Hdlol, the western portion of the District of Panch 
Mahals. The latter are separated from the Eastern Mahals 
by the States of Baria and Sunth intervening. The Railway 
has, however, annihilated the inconvenience o£ separation, and 
the five British Mahals are all administered under one Collector. 
The Collector of Panch Mahals is ex-officio Political 
A^ent for the States of the Rewa Kantha. 

o 

3. The area under this Agency is 4980 square miles, 

and the population, according to the 
Area and population. ^^ rf m ^ mmhmA 4 79 065 mU$ 

which was a decrease of 2,54,441 on the census figures of 
1891. According to the census of "921 it was 753299. The 
population consists of the following classes : — 

By religion. 

1901 1921 

Hindus 4,35 023 

Jains 1,400 

Mussalmans... 23 712 

Animistic (mostly Bhils) 18,148 j available. 
Other religions 782 



Figures nob 



! 

J 



4,79 065 

The undermentioned castes form the greafc bulk of tha 
Hindu population. 











1901 


1921 


Brahmans 


m • • 


.«• 


«•• 


19662 




Vanias ... 


• •• 


• •• 


• •• 


11,216 




Kunbis ... 


• •• 


«•• 


• •• 


34317 




Rajputs... 


• •• 


• •• 


• •• 


17,323 


Figures not 


Eolis 


• •• 


• •• 


• • • 


L 50 430 


availaole. 


Bhils ... 


• •• 


• • • 


• • • 


f 91.886 1 

118,148 f 




Naikdas 


... 


. . • 


• •• 


20 767 




Dhankras 


• •• 


• •• 


... 


18,357 





REWA KANTHA DlBECTOBt. 3 

Roughly the Bhils, Kolis, Dhankras and other lower 
castes may be said to be about 3J Lakhs. It is not understood 
on what principle the Census jOfficers distinguished 18,14$ 
"animistic" Bhils from Hindu Bhils in 1901. 

4. It is bounded on the north by the Meywar states 
of Dungarpur and Banswara, on the east by the subdivisions 
of Jhalod and Dohad in the Panch Mahals, Ali Rajpur and 
other petty States of the Bhopawar Agency and a part of 
Khandesh ; on the south by the Gaikwar territory, and the 
Mandvi sub- division of Surat, and on the west by Ankleshvvar 
and Broach, by the Gaikwar territory, by Godhra and Kalol 
in the Fanch Mahals, by Thasra and Kapadvanj in Kaira, 
and by Prantij in Ahmedabad. 

5. The Rewa Kantha Agency contains 6 large and 

66 small states. Of the large States, 
States comprized in the ^ . . . . A . ,. . A , c 

Eewa Kantha Agency. Rajpipk in the south with an area of 

1517 square miles, is of the 1st class, 
and five, Chhota Udepur and Baria in the centre, and Snath, 
Lunawada and Balasinor in the north, are all Second Glass 
States. Kadana and Sanjeli are Rajput States of some im- 
portance in the north, while Bhadarwa and Umetha, with a 
jevenue of Rs. 50000 each, form portion of the Pandu Me was 
group in the w^st. The next in importance are Mandva and 
Vajiria in the Sankheda Mewas; the former Rajput and the 
latter Molesalatn, i. e. Rajput converted to Mahomedanism* 
The rest are all below Rs. 25,000 in income. The Sankheda 
Mewas is a cluster of estates of Rajputs and Molesalans, and 
the Pandu Mewas contains, as said above, estates of Kolis, 
Barias, Rsjputs, and Mahomedans. A detailed list of these 
is given in a tabular statement published further on. 

6. In the outlying villages of the province to the west 

along the Mahi and in the north and 

A anger 

south, where th3 district stretches into the 
Guzarat plain, i. e. in Balasinor, Bhadarwa, Umetha and west p irb 
cf Rajpipla, the land iejopea and flat. But along the east border, 



4 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

and except in the tamer valleys of the Orsang and Heran, 
ever the whole centre of the district, the country is Pal land, 
hilly and forest-clad, yielding little more than the three "Ps" 
jabn, pani, and pan, that is, stones, water and leaves, The 
principal ranges of hills are the Rajpipla hills, and the Pava- 
gad hills. 

7. There are two distinct river systems, the Mahi, 

with its tributary the P&nam watering 
Rivers. 

the north, and the Narbada, joined by 

the Men, Aswan, Heran, Or and Karjan, watering the south. 

The former enters from the extreme north-east comer of Rewa 

Kantha, and flows south-west for about 120 miles through 

Kadana, Lunawada and the Pandu Mewas. The Narbada 

' enters from the east, and its couree through Rewa Kantha 

is about a hundred miles. The banks of both are much cub 

up by ravinoes. The Narbada being held in high veneration 

among the Hindus has its banks ornamented with temples 

all along its course, and passing, as it does, through a country 

of hills and forest, with banks steep and craggy, cut up by 

ravines, the knolls between being crowned with villages, ghauts 

and temples, it presents features of natural and artistic beauty, 

and a boating excursion over it is always pleasant and enjoyable. 

8. The Rewa Kantha has a considerable store of mineral 

wealth. Building stone abounds at several 
Minerals. ° __ 

places. In Ohhota Udepur, good speci- 
mens of white, yellow and grey marble are found. In this 
and the adjoining petty state of Janbughoda, mica is said 
to be in abundance, but is as yet fully unexplored. It is also said 
that iron was once worked on a large scale in these places, 
but the industry has died out for a long time past. Foe 
agates and cornelians, Rajpipla has been famous since the 
days of Ptolemy (150), and even now exports a consiierable 
quantity to Cambay and other places, where they are worked 
upon. 



REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 5 

9. The following historical account is taken from 
Hi m , , Campbell's Gazetteer for Rewa Kantha. 

Of the early history of the Province, 
little is known except a legend accord ingr to which Hidimba, 
a giantess, married Bhim, one of ths Pandav Kings of Delhi 
of Mahabharab fame (1400 B. C.) The province was then 
called flidimba Van or forest. Of this wedding the memory 
still survives in the ncrbh of Lunawada/where of several old 
ruined buildings, one is still known as the marriage-hall, Chori, 
and a large stone lying near it as the mortar, where the 
opium was prepared for the marriage feast. In another parfa 
ef the district, one of the hills of Balasinor is sacred to Bairn 
and his giant-wife. 

10. Soon after the beginning of the Christian era, 

~, _ TT . . t ^ tn . Rajpipla must already have been a placa 
Early Hindus to 1484. r ^ , , 

or some consequence, as Jrtolemy knew 

of its sardonyx hill, where the sardonyx stone is found. About 
two hundred years later, Godhrahaka or the Cow's Lake, the 
modern Godhra in the Panch Mahals, seems, from the evi- 
dence of a metal-plate inscription, to have been the head 
tjuartars of a Chief, dependent on the Valabhi Sovereigns, 
With the rise of the Anhilvada Kings (746), a new power 
was introduced into eastern Gujarat;, and Champaner became, 
and, till the fall of Anhilvada g (1304), continued th9 most 
important place in this part of the province. 

11. Under tho first Anhilvada dynasty (746-942), ex- 
cept Champaner, almost all the Rewa Kantha lands were 
under the government of Barias, that is, Koli and Bhil 
chiefs. In the eleventh, twelth, and thirteenth centuries, 
driven south and east by the pressure of Musalmau invasions, 
Chiefs of R'j[Ut or part Rajput bi >td took the placa oi the 
old Koli and Bhil leaders. Th* first established of thd33 
Rajput houses was that of the Raj h of Rajpipla. As earl/ 
as the middle of the eleventh oentu y (106 i), Limodra, tha ; 



C REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

J head quarters of the agate trade, was the seat of a Rajput 
Chief. This Raja, if descended from Chokharana, the sou 
of the Raja of Ujain who first established himself in the 
Tillage of Pipla, must have belonged to the Parmar tribe of 
Rajputs. Soon after this, a part of the Lunavada territory 
would seem to have been under a Rajput chief, with his 
head quarters at Godhra or some place near, whose family 
ivas, about the middle of the fifteenth century, partially over- 
come by the ancestors of the present Lunawada chief. In 
the middle of the fourteenth century a body of Khichi 
Ghohans, driven south by the Musalmans, settled at Chanapa- 
Her, which since the overthrow of Anhilv&da (1304) would 
«eem to have fallen into obscurity. Under its Chohdti rulers, 
until its overthrow by Mahmud Begada (1484), Champ£aer 
was one of the chief seats of power in eastern Gujarat. 

12. During this time, the Musalmila dynasty of 
Ahmedabad had been established, and 

fSJ^O^^ 079 had brou g ht a S reat P arb of the Rewa 

Kantha under its sway. By the fall of 

Chdmpdner, and the establishment there for about fifty years 

of the head quarters of Musalmtin power , almost the whole 

of the Rewa Kantha was brought under submission, and 

much of it well tilled and enriched. After the fall of Cham- 

paner, the descendants of Jayasing, the last Raval, founded 

the states of Ohhota Udeypur and Baria. In the seventeenth 

century, though trade and prosperity were nob restored to 

t the northern parts of the district, an important trade route 
passed through the south into Khandesh and Sankheda, and 

, ; some other places were centres of considerable commerce. 

13. In the eighteenth century, though the Musalman 

ascendancy in the Rewa Kantha was 
Local revival 
1700-1730.' increased by the conquest by a member 

of the family of the territory of Bala- 

sinor in the nbrth«west, the power of the Gujarat Viceroys 

I began to decline, and the Imperial claims, that had formerly 



BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. T 

\* 

included lands as remote as the Virpur subdivision of Luna- 
vada, ceased to be regularly enforced. The local chiefs no 
longer paiJ tribute, and began to levy demands from villages, 
from which they had long been shut out. This revival of local 
power did not last long. By 1730 th9 Marathas had ap- 
peared in force, and, conquering mosb 
Maratha supremacy, . ., i-ij i • j * m i. p 
1730-1820. °* plain lands, levied tribute from 

all but the poorest and remotest chiefs. 
Baria however never paid any tribute to the Marathas. Ab 
the same time, the authority of the Marathas was never 
firmly established, and the chiafs paid their tribute only under 
the pressure of military force. 

14. During these outside changes, the younger branches 
o£ the chiefs' families had from time to tim9 been forced to 
leave their homes, and win for themselves n9W estates. These 
cadet3 of the larger houses, a few daring adventurers, and 
the descendants of the original chiefs, form the present Tha- 
kors or landlords of the Sankheda aud Pandu Mewas. During 
the early years of the nineteenth century, under the weak 
misrule of Baroda, these small chieftains, except under military 
pressure, refused to pay their tribute. They plundered th* 
country around, and as the Gaikwar failed to keep order, tin 
charge of the district was undertaken by the, British. 

15. In 1803, Ajabsing, Raja of Rajpipla, died leaving 
two sons, Ramsing and Narsing. These two brothers con- 
tended for the chiefship, till ia 1807 Ramsing died, leaving 
a putative son Pratapsing. As Ramming was in possession 
of the Gadi, Pratapsing was declared Raja. Soon after, hos- 
tilities broke out between him and his unsle Narsing, and ia 
1813, Narsing formally claimed the chiefship on the ground 
that Pratapsing was not Raoasing's son. Narsing's claim waa 
not admitted, and the struggle continued till, in 1815, under 
the plea of settling the points in dispute, the Baroda Gov* 
eminent took over the whole management of the country* 



$ KEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

16. Affairs remained in this state till, in 1820, Mr. 
Willoughby, the Assistant Resident at 

tlement 1820-1825. i nfc o the opposing claims. After inquiry 

he decided that Pratapsing was not 
Ramsing's son. In the same year an agreement was con- 
cluded with His Highness the Gaikwar, under tha terms of 
Which, the control of all the Baroda trib utaries was vested 
in the British Government. At the close of 1821, Mr. Wil- 
loughby was placed in charge of Rajpipla, and he *pent nearly 
three years in putting its aflairs in order. In 1823 he also 
settled the position and tribute of the chiefs of Sankheda 
Mehwas to the north of the Narbada. These arrangements were 
completed in 1825, and, in the same year, the Baroda au- 
thorities placed the territories of the petty chiefs of the Panda 
Mehwas on the banks of the Mahi under the British control. 
At the same time, the political control of Sindhia's Panch 
Mahals was made over to the British, and the Baria state 
was transferred from the Bhopavar Political Agent. For the 
charge of these new territories, a special officer was wanted, 
and, on the 6th February 1826, Mr. Willoughby was ap- 

^ Vl . . A pointed Political Agent of Rewa Kantha 

Political Agency es- : . ,. ^ . . . & . ,.. , ^ , 

tablished in 182(5. including Rajpipla, bindhia's Panch 

Mahals, the Mehwasi estates on the 
Mahi, and on the Narbada, Baria and Chhota Udepur. 
Soon after, the st ates of Lunawada and Sunth, which, since 
1819, had been under the British control, were transferred 
from the Mahi Kantha to the Rewa Kantha Agency. In 
1829 the appointment of the Political Agent was abolished, 

and for several years the Rewa Kantha 

A AgSc7, °182 P 9 OUtiCal chiefs > thou 8 h no^Hy ™ der the 
Assistant to the Political Commissioner, 

were left very much to themselves. Tais, ia 1836, eadeJ iu 

discrder, and in 1839, special control over the NaikJa country 

was vested in the Assistant Commissioner. In 1842 ( 12fch 

January) under the order of the Court of Directors, tha office 



BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 9 

of Political Agent in Rewa Kantha was reestablished, the 

criminal powers of the chiefs were graded 

Re-establishment of j *. t» • • i u j. j 

Political Agency, 1842. and ' exce P 6 R *W l V l * who was granted 

the power of life and death the supple- 
mentary jurisdiction of the chiefs was vested in the court of 
the Political Agent No further chancre took place till, -in 
1853, the state of Balasinor was transferred from th9 Kaira 
Collector to the Rewa Kantha Political Agent; and in the 
same yaar the Sindia, for a period of ten years, handed over 
the administration of the Godbra Panch Mahals to the Rewa 
Kantha Political Agent. Again, in 1862, the Panch Mahals 
were exchanged by Sindia for districts nearer Gwalior, and 
thus became British territory. Two years later, they were 
removed from the control of the Agent, and formed into a 
separate charge. Finally in 1876, the Panch Mahals were 
raised to the rank of a district, the officer in charge of it, 
being afterwards, i e. in 1880, invested with the control of 
the Rewa Kantha states. 

17. Since 1825 the peace of the Rewa Kantha has 

- T .. , . . «, thrice been broken; in 1838 by a Naikda. 

Naikda rising. 1838. . J 

rising; in 1857 bv the presence of a 

rebel force from Upper India; and in 1868 by another Naikda 

disturbance. In 1838 the Nailsdas of Bariya, Ghhota Udepur, 

Jambughocla, and Gndhra were guilty of such excesses that 

the British Government was forced to take measures to bring 

them to crder. Captain Outram, Political Agent in the 

Mahi Kantha, drew up the plan of a campaign, and a force 

was organized, and in February 1838 under command of 

Major Forbes, was despatched to the disturbed parts. Military 

posts were at the same time stationed at several places on 

the frontier, and the fastnesses, in which the Naikda leaders 

had taken refuge, were surrounded, and inducements were 

held out to them to surrender. Before the close of the year > 

with the help of the Chiefs of Bariya and Chhota Udepur 

and the rulers of Baioda and Gwalior, the leading Naikdas 

2 



10 KEWA KANTHA DIRECTOBT. 

were either caught or had submitted. Several of them were 
sentenced to terms ot imprisonment, and on giving security 
for good behaviour the rest were released. These disturbances 
were caused by two chief gangs of outlaws. Keval of Bara 
in the district of Bariya, his brother Jaiam Rupa Naik and 
his manager Onkarsing, the leader of one ot the gangs, 
helped by Makranis and some malcontents from Udepur and 
Jambughoda, carried cfF cattle and other property of the Raja 
of Udepur. The other gang under Virarn Naik, Mahaiev 
Naik his brother, and Amra Naik, laid waste and almost 
depopulated the lands of Rajgad under Baria. To prevent 
future disorder, the lawless sub division of Sagtala was 
detached from Bariya and placed under the direct supervision 
of the Political Agent. A post wa3 fixed there, order was 
established, and the deserted villages resettled. 

18. On the 26th November 1858, Lt. Vibart, coramand- 

m ™ ,. +r~~ * n £ a t Dohad in the Panch Mahals, 
The Mutiny 1857. rt 

heard from the Indore Bhil Agent that 
& body of rebels had entered its districts and that Tatia 
Topi had, on the 24th, b?en at Than on the Bombay read 
between Khcrampur and Tulvada. Three days later ( November 
29th), the Indore Bhil Agent sent a further message that 
Tatia Topi's force about 3000 strong had on the 26bh crossed 
the Narbada by a ford below Chikalda, and moved ta Kuk3i, 
a meeting place of road3 from Gujarat, Malwa and Nimar 
and that on the next day (27th) a cslumu under Brigadier 
Park had, at Monipur, crossed the Narbada in pursuit of 
the rebels. Shortly after, the manager at Amjhara reported 
that the rebels were at Kuksi on the 28th, and that thay 
intended to move on to Dohad through Ali Rtjpur. At tbe 
same time, the Pclitical Agent heard that on tha 25th Tati* 
Topi was attacked and defeated by a detachment from Malwp, 
and that hia troops fled towards Vadvadi ford on the Narbada 
thirty miles off, and were pursued on the 26th. On the 29 bh j 
the rebel force entered the Udepur territory, Hearing of 



BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 11 

their approach the Chief, then in the district settling the 
land revenue, returned to Udepur and shut the gates of its 
small fort. On the following day ( 30fch November ), the 
rebels arrived and plundered the town. But nest morning; at 
daybreak, Brigadier Park surprised and dispersed them. 
Small parties fled south and sou^h west, and at Jhabugam 
several of them were made prisoners by a detachment from 
Baroda. A large body with Tatia Topi and a person called 
the Kao Saheb arrived atBiriya on the morning of the 2nd 
December, much worn out, and other small parties wandered 
about in the Bariya forests. The main body, with all their 
elephants bat one, had on the first alarm doubled back and 
made their way through the heavy forest east to Bhabra 
From Bhabra they made their way to Bariya, the whole 
joining on the 5th at the Baria village of Piplod. Meanwhile 
the Baria party joining the other fugitives had moved south- 
west, threatening the Halol and Baroda road, and returned 
to Piplod. On the 6th leaving a covering party at Piplod, 
the whole force began to retreat in the direction of Jhaloi. 
On the next day Captain Muter's detachment advanced 
from Gcdhra to Piplod and on the evening of the 8th reached 
Dohad, the rebels retreating before them but not leaving till 
they bad plundered the town of Limbdi and Jhalol Brigadier 
Park's column arrived at Bariya on the 11th, marched to 
Lunavada on the 13th, and thence on the 14th went to 
K&dana, where Captain Thompson's detachment had arrived 
from Godtra. 

19 On the 17th, news came that from ten to twenty 
thousand rebels were to be at Kuksi on the 18th, and a 
telegram from Sir Hugh Tt^se told thr.t a body of 700 or 
800 rebel cavalry, popularly known as the army of the 
Peshwa, had crossed the Narbada. As it was rumoured that 
this force would enter Gujarat by the route Tatia Topi had 
taken, Captain Collier with two companies of Native Infantry 
was posted at Chhota Udepur, Jhalod was occupied by 



12 



REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



about eighty men of the 33rd Regiment, and Bariya by the 
tfesfc of the 33rd and two guns. Colonel Ceilings stopped at 
Dama Vav in Bariya, so as to command the rebel fknk, 
should they advance from Udepur towards Baroda. Lunavada 
was protected by a British force, and Balasinor strengthened 
by 100 men of the Kaira Police. The freedom of the district 
from any further inroad of hostile troops was probably due 
to the careful distribution of these force?. 

20. During the mutiny, besides from Tatia Topi's 
raid, Rewa Kantha suffered from local disturbances. Unsettled, 
perhaps incited by the mutineers, the Bhils, and Kolis raised 
their hands against their well-to-do neighbours, and foreign 
mercenaries and outlaws defied their chiefs or tried to persuade 
them to rise against the paramount powir. In Lunavada in 
June 1857, as his claims to the chief-ship were not admitted, 
Surajmal went into outlawry, attacked the town of Lunavada 
in July 1857, and failing in his attempt fled to Salumbar 
in Meywar. He remained in outlawry for some months. But, 
at length, satisfied by the liberal terms oftared by the Raja, 
he returned to obedience without causing any disturbance. 
Simila 1 , Jamadar Mustafa Khan, the heal of the Sunth 
foreign mercenaries, advanced a claim of Rs. 4674 for arrears 
of pay. This demand was accompanied with such threats that; 
the Chief applied to the Political Agent for protection. A 
party of the Gujarat Irregular Horse under th3 command of 
a European officer was, in August 1857, deputed to arrest 
the Jamadar. The Jamadar, resisting the attempt to arrest 
him, was fired at and killed. His followers fl)d, and order 
was restored. 

21. Aboub the middle ot August 1857, one Syed 
Morad AU attempted to raise a disturbance in Rajpipia and 
about the same time, the chief or vasava of Sdgbara at&D 
gave tioable. Later, in 1858, under the leadership o£ Keval 
Dama and liupa Gobar, the Ndikdas rose in open rebellion, 
and were not put down till a large body of troops had acted 



KEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 1J 

against them for eighteenths. This disturbance was chiefly 
in the Panch Mahals, to which the two leaders belonged. 
Within Rewa Kantha limits there w*s sote fighting in Udepur 
and Bariya, but no action of consequence except, on the 1 8th 
January 1859, a night) attack on Lieutenant Richardson's 
camp. On the ] Oth March, Keval Dama, the leading outlaw, 
surrendered to Major Wallace, and on the 23rd May, Rupa 
Gobar to Captain Hayward. Eirly in 1859, there were 
gatherings and threatening movements among the Sankheda 
Mehwas* Bhils. In the month of March, the Political Agent 
moved into the district, convicted nine of the ringleaders and 
restored order. 

22. On the 2nd February 1868, Rupsing Naik of 

Dandiapur in the P. nch Mahals district of Jambughoda, one 

of the pardoned 1857 rebels, with about 

Naikda rising 1868. r , , , n ^ - * 

500 men attacked the post of Rajgad 

in the state of Bariya. He failed in his chief object, tha 

murder of the Bariya {Superintendent, who had very shortly 

before left Rajgad. In other respects the attack was successful,. 

Three of the defenders were killed and three wounded, and 

about Rs. 800 in money, the arms and ammunition of tha 

post, two horses, and much private property, were carried 

away. After the attack on Rajgad, Rupsing retired into the 

Panch Mahals, and, being joined by N&ikdas and several 

Makranis, sacked Jambughoda and threatened Halol. Among 

Rupsing's comoauions, was Joria Bhagat, who claimed 

supernatural power, and was styled God, Farmeshvar. Such 

panic did he inspire among the ignorant people of th3 district;, 

that he gained his first fights without suffering any loss. 

Flushed with success, on the 6th February he attacked tha 

post of Jetpur in Chhota Udepur. But being met by the 

Chief who with some followers was hunting close by, threa 

of his men wery killed. Though this los3, to some extent, 

shook the confidence of the NtLikd&s, their leader sent so 

defiant a message to the Udepur Chief that, giving up tha 



14 REWA KANTHA DIBBOTOBT. 

post of Kadval and Jetpur, he centered his troops for the 
defence of Chhota Udepur. Before disorder spread further! 
the Bhagat's headquarters were attacked by a British force, 
one of the leading men was slain and two wounded, and open 
resistance was crushed. Rupsing, the Bhagat, and Rupsing's 
son Galalia, pursued with untiring vigour, ware caught, tried 
and hanged. This rising was almost entirely confined to Panch 
Mahdls J>a ; kdas. Only a few of Rupsing's followers —and 
these men of no position— belonged to the Rewa Kantha 
states. 

23. With these exceptions, the public p9aca has, during the 

^ _ _ succeeding fifty years, remained unbroken. 

Changes and reiorms. 

For the levy of the revenue and tribute, 

the display of military force is no longer needed; the favoarite 

crimes of gang robbery end cattle-stealing have to a great 

extent been suppressed; and disputed boundaries, the fruitful 

cause of ill-feeling and bloodshed, have been fixed. The last 

question of political importance to be settled belonged to 

one class, i.e. the relations of the Gaikwar to the smaller 

Chiefs. Of these one of the most important was the settlement 

of the rival claims o£ the Chhota Udepur chief and the 

Baroda Government to the sub-divisions of Vd,ma and Jhabugam. 

These sub-divisions, Vasna wita thirty-four and Jhabugam 

with eight villages, under the double management of Chhota 

Udepur and Baroda Agents, fell into suoh disorder that, in 

the interests of the public peace, they were in 1865 taken in 

charge by the Political Agent. In the management of the 

revenues no change was made. Rents were realized, as th^y 

had been realized before, and the share of each claimant was 

handed over to him. At the same time steps were taken to 

record the rights of each party in the different villages, and 

at last in 1873, it was settled that the Jhabugam subdivision 

should be handed over to Chhota Udepur, and Visna and a 

few villages to Baroda. 



REWA KAHTHA DIRECTORY. IS 

24. Another difficult point, partly settled, is thecDntrol i 

__ , ™ i °f the sacred town of Chanod, at the 

Disputes about Lhanod. 

confluence of the Or and the Narbada. 

The question of ownership, and of civil and criminal 

jurisdiction, was disputed between the Mandwa. Chief and 

the Gaikwar, the disputes giving rise to much ill feeling, 

ending some times in a breach of peace. It has been decided 

that the town belongs to the Mandva Chief, that 

civil* and criminal jurisdiction rests with the Gaikwar but 

that disputes relating to immoveable property should be decided 

by the Rana. This dual control and jurisdiction is however 

productive of much friction and in spite of several attempts for a 

separation of interests no progress has' been made in this direction. 

25. Again, there is a wider phase of the same question 

in the disputes between the Gaikwar 
A\antas in Baroda ~ . . ti ^ x ~, , 

territory. Government and the petty Kewa Kantha 

Mehw&a chiefs. The chiefs claim, as 
the former proprietors, lands and revenues in Gaikwar villages 
and these claims the Baroda Government had for years 
struggled, either altogether or in great part, to disallow- The 
interest of earlier Rajput chiefs, in villages conquered by the 
Marat has, varies considerably. In many they still have the 
chaulh Vdnta, th&t is, the ownership and control of one-fourth 
part of the village; in others they keep the share of the 
land, but have lost CDntrol; and in others both control and 
land have been lost, but the right to levy a C9S3 remains. 
By degrees the shares of the original chiefs were divided 
among heirs and descendants who complicated matters by 
disposing of them by sale or mortgage. Besides these claimants, 
directly or indirectly representing the original chiefs and land- 
lords, there are the descendants of successful bandits and 
freebooters who, with no hereditary right, had in unsettled 

*NorB — in civil matters the Gaekwar has jurisdiction 
in suits between the residents of Chandol regarding pecuniary 
matters only. 



jUJ kewa kantha directory. 

times succeeded in extorting payments from the villagers. 

Thus it happened that in 1825 when the Rewa Kantha 

Agency was established, there was scarcely a village in the 

neighbouring Gaikwar territory, in which Retfa Kantha 

sabjects did not possess a cl^im of some description. In 1825 

under Mr. Willoughby's settlement, tho Mehvasis' claims 

were guaranteed to them. For nearly forty years, chiefs and 

girasias tilled their lands, gathered their rents and money 

dues, and parted freely by mortgage, sale or gift with their 

interest in lands within Gaikwar limits. In 1862 the late 

Gaikwar ordered the levy from alienated lands of a one eighth 

share of their rental and attempted to enforce this levy on 

the lands and mon^y claims erjoyed by Rewa Kantha Girusids 

within Gaikwar limits. Had not the power of the Political 

Agent been exercised to prevent it, this demand would have 

provoked a breach of the peace. The Rewa Kantha chiefs 

were persuaded to remain quiet and leave tiieir claims in tho 

Political Agent's hands. The Baroda Government declined 

to admit that the guarantee given in Mr. Willoughby's original 

settlement was enough to establish the gird^ids* claims; and 

points connected with this quastion were for yeat3 in disputo 

between the Rewa Kantha Political Agent and the B*roda 

State. As matters made no progress towards settlement, it 

was, in 1877, arranged that the yirasias claims should be 

inquired into and settled by a special British Officer. The 

enquiry and settlement of rights have been concluded. Rules 

have been framed, with the sanction of the Government 

of India, prescribing procedure for the collection of revenue 

by the owners of the wantas, and any disputes relating to 

them are now first disposed of by His Highness the Gaikwar's 

officers, subject to appeal to the Resident of Baroda. 

26. The only chie£ in Rewa Kantha, who enjoys first 

class jurisdiction, that is, power to try, 
Jurisdiction of chiefs . , ^ . . c ., Q *. u - , 

aud Agency defined. Without permission from the Political 

Agent, for capital offences any persons 
except British subjects, is the Raja of Rajpipla, The Chief* 



BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 17 

cf Chhota Udepur, Baria, Lunawada, Balasinor and Sunfch 
have second class jurisdiction, that is, power to try for 
capital cffences their own subjects only. They have unlimited 
powers in civil matters. Kadaaa is a third class state. 
Bhadarwa is in the fourth class. Sanjeli was formerly in 
the fourth class but has been placed in the fifth class in 
the recent gradation. It has protested against it. Umefcha, 
Jambughoda, Mandwa and Vajiria are in the fifth class, 
being petty states with limited magisterial powers. 
Capital and other serious offences committed in the latter 
States by foreigners or British subjects and all offences 
committed in the smaller Mewasi states, are tried by the 
agency courts, of which the Political Agent's Court is the 
chief. This Court was established in 1842 by an order from 
the Court of Directors. The Mehwasl estates are supervised 
by Thandars who have limited magisterial and civil powers. 
Some of the Mehwasi Thakors have been granted petty 
jurisdiction for tin disposal of local disputes. Civil suits 
upto a certain extent are heard by the Thandars, and above 
them is the Court of the Deputy Political Agent and the - 
Political Agent. 

27. In 1840 the leading chiefs of Rewa Kantha, 

following the example of H. H, the 

Prevention of suttee. 

Gaikwar, entered into engagements 

to prevent suttee, and this kind of self immolation is now 

unknown in these parts. 

23. In 1872, British copp3r coinage was introduced 
into the States under this Agency, on 
the understanding that n :> more native 
coin should be issued by the States from their own mints, 
that only British coin should ba a legal tender, and th*t 
it should not be issued at a discount. Before 1300 the 
silver currency was in* British as well as Gaekwar'3 Biba- 



Coinage. 



•13 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

shahi Rupees. But the latter was stopped anl recalled in 
accordance with arrangements made with Hi3 Highness the 
Gaekwar in 1900, and the rate of conversion was fixed at 130 
;Bdt^s}^hi Rupees for 100 British Rupee?. 

29. In 1882, engagements to prevent the cultivation 

of the poppy and illicit importation of 
Opium and Abkari. . , , r . A t , 

opium were taken trom the states unler 

this Agency, and with their consent certain regulations for 

the possession, saie aud transit of opium are being enforced 

throughout the territories of all states. The larger states 

import opium for their consumption from Malwa free of 

duty, but charge the full cost (including duty) to the 

purchasers, whereby they derive the benefit of the du'y for 

themselves. The Mehwasi chiefs have entrusted their opium 

and abkari arrangements to the British Government ; the 

duty on the actual sales of opium in their ^respective states 

is given to them by Government together with compensation 

for loss of transit duties abolished, and in the case of the 

s latter, i. e. abkari, fixed compensation is granted annually 

to each. 

30. Transit duties have been abolished throughout 
the Rewa Kantha states, and trade is now practically as free 
as in British districts in this respect, but most of the states 
have still kept on impor,t and export dutie?. 

31. In 1885 a locsl corps was raised to discharge th9 

police duties under the Agency, pre- 
Agency Police. 

viously performed by the Gaikwar s 

Contingent, which was disbanded in that year in accordance 

with agreement made in 18S1 with Baroda. This polica 13 

under the control of the District Superintendent of Police of 

Panch Mahals and has been amalgamated with the District 

Police. 



KEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. l<fr 

32. The gross revenue of the States under the Agency 

t> j i -i ,. is estimated at about Rs. 56,00,000. A 

.Revenue and tribute. ' 

few of the Chiefs pay tribute to the 
British Government, aggregating Rs. 24,382, and the rest pajr 
Rs. 1,30,801 to H. H the Gaikwar, every year. 

33. Within the last 40 years, the principal states* 

have one and all come under British 
Reforms in Adminis- aj • •„*. ,- , , A A 

t ra tion. Administration, whereby important 

reforms in revenue collections, adminis- 
tration of justice, forest conservation and other cognato matters 
have been introduced, Most of the states now follow the^ 
spirit of the British laws, and the Chiefs take a personal 
and intelligent share in the government of their respective 
territories. Roads, schools, dispensaries, libraries, electric lights 
& motor cars can now be seen in the capitals of the more im- 
portant chiefs. Besides the ordinary schools f>r boys and 
girls, there is a special school for the sons of Talukdara at 
Godhra which is maintained by contributions from the petty 
chiefs of the Mewas, aided by a grant from Governments 
Formerly it was located at Vajiria, but the isolated situation* 
of the school there, came in the way of its success, and it* 
was therefore transferred to Godhra, where it has the ad* 
vantage of efficient supervision and more light. There is ** 
High School at Natidod, maintained solely by the R&jpipla state 
and the A, V. Schools at Baria and Lunavada teach the Hi*b 
School Standards a j so. For the students of the other states^ 
the High School at Godhra is available, to the construction 
of which they contributed a substantial sum through the 
good offices and sympathetic exertions of Dr. J, Pollen^ 
I. C. S., L. L. D., who held the office of Political Agent,, 
Rewa Kantha, froaa 1893 to 1895. Here a Boarding Hou<e 
attached to the High School and maintained by Government 
and Native ^ta'.es, affords accommodation to the students 
coming from adjoining States as well as British Mahals* 
Rajpipla has spent a large sum of money, more than 1& 



20 liEWA KAKTHA DIBECTORY. 

Lakhs of Rupees in connecting its capital by a Railway line 
of its own with the B. B. & C. I. Railway at Aukleshwar; 
and Chhota Udepur has followed suit. Baria and Sunth have 
constructed metalled roads from the nearest Railway Station 
to their towns, within their respactive limits, Lunawada has 
ken connected by raf with Grodhra recetltjy. 

34. intestine disputes are singularly conspicuous by 

their total absence, and dissentfrns 

Intestine disputes. , , ^,, . c j ™ , N L P , 

1 between Uhiers and Bhd^ ats are few and 

far between. Complaints from subjects to the Agency are 

fewer still. This baspeaks good government by the respactive 

Rulers & the contentment of the people and landed aristocracy. 

35. Until tbe advent of the dire famine of 1?92 1900, 
none of the states were embarrassed by debts, which also indicates 
a wholesome and careful system of administration, rarely to 
be seen in other parts of the Ouzarat A jennies. The CDndibicn 
of the Caiefs, people and country, a3 saen to-day, naturally 
presents a striking contrast to the unsettled and wild picture 

depicted in the narratives of the British 

Striking contrast officers, who effected the settlement of 
between the condition ot 

the country in 1825 and th ^ country m 1820-2o. Taere is n^ 
to-day. denying the fact that the province has, 

under the protecting shield of the British 
Government, marched with the times. The Chiefs are loyal 
to the core, and the people law abiding. Outlawry is unknown, 
and serious dacoities are very few except in the period of 
famine. 

36. The famine of 1899-1900 followed by successive 

adverse seasons, however, crippled the 
Effects of the famine. ~ , ,. , ." . 

resources ot the bcates and subjects, and 

caused a great diminution in the papulation; from 7,33.506 

in 1891 it came down to 4,79,065 in 1901; the lower classes, 

especially Bhils, Kolis and Naikdas wno ab3und, suffered the 

most, many a village were laid waste and numerous families 

extinguished. 



REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 21 

37. The figures given in the margin show the staady 

^ , .. increase which the provincs made 

Population. r 

in population before the famine of 1899 
1872 — 5,12,569 J /T , . i i *u 

Iggl ■> 49 892 anc * t " e g reab decrease caused by the 

1891 — 7,3 >, 506 famine. They show that the famine 

1901—4,79,065 ^ ^ prov j rce lu p ; nt f population 

more than 30 years back, and the same may b- said of 
the resources of the peofftS and chiefs. It was htfped hoover 
that the next decade would bring a succession of prosperous 
years and enable the province to rtcuperate und9r the divine 
blessing of pax Britanka. 



38. The above observations ware written in 1903, i. e. f 

nearly 18 years ago. The census of 1911 
Increase in population. ghowed fchQ tofcal p3 p u!ation f the 

Rewakantha Agency to be 6 65,120 as a^tnst 4 79,065 ia 
1901, which meant an increase of 1,86 055 i.e. 38 per cent 
during the decenium. The last census of March 1921 shewed 
the total population to be 7,53,293, ?. e. an increase of 
88,179 over the figure of 1911, or a rise cf 13 per cant. This 
decade was visited by various attacks of plague and a severe 
type of influenza, which carried off a large number of persons; 
otherwise the increase would have been larger. The present, 
populatiou has now reached the figure of 1891, when itwas 
7,33,506. Thus it appears that the repeated famines, plague 
and influenza which prevailed successively at intervals of two 
or three years absorbed all natural and normal increases of 
population, and these cm roughly be estimated to be nearly 
3 lakhs of persons during the last 30 years, 

39. It is however satisfactory to note that the revenues 

cf all states have more than doubled 
Increase in revenue. 

during the last twenty years, as will be 

seen from the following abstract of comparison. 



22 



BEWA KANTHA DIRECTOKY. 



State. 


Revenue in 
1898-99. 


Revenue in 
1920-21. 


Kajpipla ... 


••• 


...j 


8,30,600 


22 68,000 


Chhota Udepur 


... 


••• 


2,95,400 


11,20.000 


Baria 


... 


. • • 


4,15,600 


951,000 


Lunawada ... 


... 


••» 


2,72,300 


3.55,000 


Sunth Rampur 


•••• 


•»» 


160,500 


2,57,200 


Balasinor ... 


••• 


... 


1,93.400 


2,68,800 


Kadana 


••• 


••• 


29 200 


76 9C0 


Bhadarwa ... 


... 


... 


41500 


60,000 


Sanjeli 


• • • 


••• 


25,600 


56,400 


Umetha 


•• • 


••• 


41,500 


53,800 


Jambughoda. 


... 


• • i 


25,000 


1,01,400 



The Taluk dari school 
at Godhra. 



During this period many improvements in the adminis- 
tration of the Agency and the States have also taken place. 

40. The Talukdari school for the sons of Talukdars 
of Rewa Kantha, was established 
at Vajiria in the Sankheda Mewas in 
1885, by Mr. Woodward. Funds for 
construction of the building were supplied by the Thakor of 
Vajiria. It was transferred to Godhra, the Head Quarters of 
Agenoy, and the new building constructed for it from funds 
subscribed by the chiefs w*s opened t?y H. E, the Governor, 
Lord Sydenham, in January 1908, in the presence of a large 
number of Chiefs and Talukdars who were invited to attend 
the function. Some of the larger Chiefs agreed to give 
scholarships and made donations for its support. The Rvj% 



BEWA KANTHA DIBECTORY. 2S 

of Chhota Udepur founded a gold Medil to be annually 
swarded to the best Rajput student of the school. There 
are at present 7 6 Kuratrs studying in the school. The 
staff was reorganised in 1911 and religious and moarl instrac- 
tion was introduced. 

41. The states of Baria, Chhota Udepnr, Balasinor, 

n i -nj i- Sunth, Bhadarwa and Sanjeli have made 

General Education. # J 

primary education in their respective 
states free, which is a step in the right direction. Bat the 
general education of the people does dot seem to have made 
much progress. There were 249 schools for boys and girls 
in the year 1920-21 against 150 in 1903-04, for a population of 
753299 which means one school for every 3000 persons. It would 
perhaps be advisable in these days of rapid progress to pay 
some greater attention to the education of the masses and t3 
follow the lines adopted in contiguous British Districts in 
this matter. 

42. In May 1909 a conference of Diwans and Kar- 
bharis was held for the first time in Godhra and also an 
Agricultural Exhibition was organised in connection there- 
with. Considerable interest was evinced in both these 
actings by the Chiefs and their subjects. 

43. A year later, i. e., in 1910, the Rewa Kantha 

Chiefs' Association was formed undar 
Chiefs' Association* 

the inspiration of Mr. R. C. Brown, 

Political Agent, and held a meeting at Godhra in Ojbober, 

which lasted a week. It tended to strengthen the friendly 

relations of Chiefs and to conduce to the harmonious conduct! 

of inteistital business. 



24 BEWA KAN1HA DIRECTORY. 

44. In 1913, Mr. Claytcn, the Political Agent, 
started a similar association of the 

under the name and style of Mewas 

_ Hit kaini Salba, when opportunity was 

Mewas Eitkarni Sabha. x , . . uT *u 

taken to impress upon them the neces- 
sity of curtailment of ceremonial expenditure, of giving to 
the ryots fixity of tenure and of improvement in the method 
of land revenue assessment, and also in the general tone of 
management with a view to pecuring prosperity cf the ryots 
tinder altered conditions. A committee was appointed to 
frame rules. The rules were accordingly framed and passed 
in a general meeting of Talukdars of the Mewas presided 
over by the Political Agent in 1914. They were amplified 
in a general meeting held in 1915. 

45. The outbreak of the Great War and the prevalence 
of famine and pestilence retarded the operations of such social 
gatherings and politioal conferences, and it may be hoped 
that they will be resuscitated with the advent of normal 
times. 

46. The capitals of the states of Rajpipla, Chhota 

Udepur and Baria are now adorned with 

Other improvements. . • A • rui a i t. i. j 

r electric hgnts, telephones connected 

with subsidiary Mahal towns, and water works. Railways 

have been extended to the towns of Chhota Udepur and 

Lunawada. Mining operations are conducted in the Chhota 

Udepur and Jambughoda states, while the forest conservancy 

is attended to, on a systematic and scientific plan, which has 

contributed to the increase of revenue in the states posses- 

sing forests of appreciable size. 

TEE BEIL RISING. 

47. There was no important disturbance of the public 

tranquility, during the last 18 years except 
Bliil rising ot 1913. ,, -r>, ., . . . xt _ , L t : 

to a small ±>hil rising in the Sunth state in 

1912, One Govindgar, a banjara b/ caste, originally b3io,)ging 



BEWA K ANTH A DIRECTORY. ' "2 5 

to the Dungarpur state in the Southern Rajputana Agency, 
€#rly in 1912, apparently pet upon himself the task o? improving 
the moral?, habits and religious practices of the Bhils. 

47. Within a short time a large number of Bhils belonging 
to this as well as to the Statss of Banswara, Dungarpur 
and the British districts of Panch Mahals became his disciples. 
Finding a very large gathering under him, Govindgar very 
artfully and by degrees changed his religious propaganda ta 
a political one, that of establishing a Bhil Raj ; with this 
object in view he sent messages to his disciples far And wide 
to gather together on Mangadh Hill during the Diwali 
holidays. He quietly repaired to the Hill, where the Bhils f 
fired with the prospect o£ a Raj, flocked in large numbers 
armed with guns, bows 8nd arrows, 8 words*, etc., etc. 

48. On the 31st October an armed body of Bhil3 
from the Mangadh Hill attacked the Police outpost of 

Gadhran, looted it, killed one Police Constable and carried 
away the Jamtidar who was kept a prisoner upto the 15 h 
November. Elated by this success, the next day they 
attacked the fort of Partapgadh, but were repulsed by the 

state police. They then took to looting villages in Sunth 
and Bfinswara limits. 

49. The States concerned, having become seriously 
alarmed at thh» lawlessness, communicated the matter to their 
respective Political Officers. The Hon'ble Mr. R. P. Barrow, 
Commissioner N. D., and Mr. C. W. M. Hudson, Political 
Agent, Rewa Kantha, with a detachment cf armed Agency 
Police under the District Superintendent of Police, repaired 
to the scene of disturbance from the Sunth side, and Major 
Hamildon from the Southern Rajputana States. 

50. These Officers having tried in vain t3 persuade 
Govindgar to disperse the unlawful assembly, at last tele- 
graphed for the Military. More than one opportunity was 
given to Govindgar to disperse the Bhils, but) to no purpose. 
At last on the 16th November, orders were given to the 

Senior Officer in command of the troops to clear the Hill 
with as little bloodshed as possible. 
4 



56 BBWA KAKTHA DlftECTOftY. 

51. The orders were carried out thoroughly and 
expeditiously and in the moat humane manner possible. 

Govindgar, Punja Pargi and other ringleader* belonging 

to Banswara, Dungarpir &c f| were made prisoners. 

The States concerned having delegated their powers 
to Government for disponing of this case, a special tribunal 

was appointed consisting of Major Gough of the 
Political Department of tbe Government of India and Mr. 
Allison, I. 0. S., Bombay, to try the accused. The 
trial took place in February 1914, Govindgar was convicted 
under Section 121 and sentenced to be hanged, Punja 
Pargi under Section 121 and 302 and sentenced for each 
of the offences to transportation for life, and the rest of the 
accused under Section 148 and 149 to 3 years' rigorous 

imprisonment, Oa appeal before the Commissioner N. D, 
the conviction of Govindgar was upheld, bub tha sentanoe 
was reduced to transportation for life. Bath the convictions 
and sentences passed against Punja Wc*re upheld and confirmed. 
The sentences of the rest of the accused were reduced to 
aix months' rigorous imprisonment. This affair, i£ not 
promptly put down, would have ended m >st disastrously for the 
states concerned as well as for the surrounding British Districts. 

The lawless character of the inhabitants of these parts 
is further described in an appendix to this account p. 32 (a). 

THE GREAT WAR. 

52. The great war with Gsrmany and her allien gave 

m „ „. an opportunity to the Chiefs and 

The Great War. m i , T c *u x> tr v \ 

lalukdar3 or the Kewa Kantaa Agency 

to express their unflinching loyalty to the British Government. 

They placed themselves and their resources at the disposal 

of Government. Meetings for wishing success to the Allies 
were helJ frequently and haniso ne contributions to the 
various war funds were* received. Maharaval Shri Hiirjit- 
sinhji, Raja of Baria, went to the front in France in 
January 1915 and returned in June 1915. 

53. The subscriptions to the First Indian War Loan 
amounted to over fifteen lakh?. Large .sums were subscribed 



BEWA KAHTHA DIRECTORY. 2T 

by the Darbars and their subjects and the Talukdars. The 
Raja of Chhota-Udepur subscribed Rs 59,625 from his private 
resources in addition to one lakh from the State, and Rs. 
1.06,950 from the subjects. Of the smaller States Sanjeii 
contributed Rs. 30,00 and Umetha Rs. 20 000. 

54. The Women's Branch of the Impel ial War and 
Relief Fund worked enthusiastically under Mrs. Snnrb and 
Mrs. Hudson, wives of the then Political Agents, who took 
keen interest in popularising the Fund. The contributions bo 
the Fund were particularly liberal, and this Fund received 
support from nearly all the Chiefs ani Thakors. The total 
contribution amounted to Rs. 35,000. In additiou t> the 
collection of donations this Branch also supplied to the h*ad 
Branch of Bombay, a number of shirts, pyjamis and othar 
necessary materials for th9 comfort of soldiers. The contribu- 
tions to the Imperial War and Relief FunJ amounted to 
Rs. 86,485, From the 'Oar Day Fund' tha total subscrip- 
tions were Rs. 20,028, of whish Rs 10.003 oam3 from tha 
Rajpipla Darbar and Rs. 2,684 from Chho^a Udepur, Rs. 
2,000 from B%ria and Rs. 1,844 and 1 000 from Suath and 
Baiasinor States respectively. The day was observed through* 
out the Agency, and the Ruling Chiefs and Thakors did 
their utmost to mako the celebration of the 'Jay" a success 

55. Since 1st of April 1918, ths following splendid 
donations towards the prosecution of the war were made : — 

His Highness the Raja of Rajpipla, Rs. 2 two lakhs 
and 1 lakh every year till the end of the war. 

The R«ja of Chhota-Udepur, Rs. 25,000 and R*.20,000 
every year till the end of the war. 

The R*ja of B*ria, Rs. 75,000 and Rs. 30 000 e?ery 
year till the end of the war. 

56. His Highness Mnhirana Shri Vijaysinhji, Raja 
of Rajpipla, offered an aeroplane at the tim9 of his installa- 
tion, which was accepted wit.h thanks by Government Th* 
Raja of Lunavada contributed Rs. 10,000 towards tin Solanki 



28 >t , BBWA KANTHA DIRBCTOBY. 

Flight of aeroplanes offered by His Highness the Raja of Rewa, 
while, the Nawab of Bala«unor offered a motor aaabulanc3. 

57. There was no sign of slackening in the loy*l and 
liberal support of the States of this Age icy in providing 
recruits to the Army of the Enpire, and this subject deserves 
a definite description, Bafjre regular recruiting bag* \ in 
July 1917, the Rija of Baiiac3ntributed45 recruits, His High- 
ness the Raja of Rvjpipla sent 22 men in Au^usi; and the 
Raja of B*ria 40 in September. Qpto the en 1 of September 
1918, 143 recruits were supplied. At the baginning of 
October 1918, a Conference of the Ruling Princes of the 
seven chief states of the Agency was held at Gjdhra, and 
all followed the example of the Raja of Baria in offering 
liberal terms to recruits in grants of land, remission o£ 
assessment and bonuses. These concessions did n^t htva the 
effect which was exacted, but by the end oc March 1918 the 
Rewa Kantha Agency supplied 298 recruits. In April 1918 
the Panch Mahals and Rewa Kantha Recruiting Depot; was 
opened by the Commissioner, Northern Division, at Godhra* 
Ov<=r Rs. 3,000 were collected at the opening of the Depot 
from the leading men of the Panch Mahals and the Godhra 
public. Each Police constable contributed and the greatest 
enthusiasm was displayed. The Ruling Chiefs and the 
Thakors of the Agency gave lioeral oDntributions including 
Rs. 500 from His Highiess the Raja of Rajpiph, who at 
the same tiim g^ve R*. 500 to the Surat Dspob, Rs. 500 
from the Raja cf Chhota IJdepur and Rs. 751 from the 
Thakor of Jambughoda. Tas total sabsoribions from the* 
Agensy amounted to Rs 4470. The Political Agent Mr. 
Smart attended a Dirbar held by His Highness tne Raj* 
of Rajpipla at Jhagadu at which M:. Malcolm Koth*wa.a, 
District Assistant Recruiting Offi3e;, and all the officials of 
the State we.e present. Nearly all the men from the smaller 
States and also from Rtjpiplt wera bcal. Tae total number 
of recruits enrolled in the Agency upbo the end of August 
1918 amounted to 889. Considering the great difficulties 



KEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 29>~ 

-.•-■>■... r 

to be overcome in this Agency, where the people are primi- 
tive and frightened at the prospect of leaving their homes, 

the fact that local men came in considerable numbers was 
evidence of the desire of the Ruling Chiefs aid Thakors of 

the Agency to respond to the c*ll of His Excellency the 
Viceroy for men. The State oEBiria was remarkable for 
the large number of combatants contributed; Lunavada for 
its steady Row of men from October 1917 and the highest 
total, Sunth-Rampur and Kadana for the large number of 

men sent; and the unsparing efforts ot the Ruling Chiefs to 
do their utmost to supply men were conspicuous in every 

way. In Sankheda Mewas the untiring efforts of Thakor 

Mahomedmia of Uchad to produce recruits were remarkable, 

and he led the way. The Thakors of Vajiria, Agar, Naswadi, 

Gad Roriad, Shanor and Jiral Kamsoli, amongst others, 
contributed men from Sankheda Ma was and the Thikors of 

Mevli> Pandu and Itwad, amongst others, in Pandu Mewas, 
also sent in men. 

58 # On the very satisfactory conclusion of th9 War 

ending in a complete victory for the 
Recognition by Briti§h arms d Am GoVQra . 

ixovernment of help • 

rendered in the war. ment have been pleased to recognize and 

appreciate the loyal services and mate- 
rial help rendered by the Chiefs of the Rewa Kantha. Tha 

salute of H. EL the Raja of Rajpipla has been raised to 13 
guns permanently, with the title of Maharaji, and those of 

the Rijas of Baria and Lunavada to 11 gun3 as personal 
distinctions. The young and energetic Princa o£ B^ria has 
also received the unique distinction of K. C.S.I. The Taakor 
of Kadaia has been promoted to tie 3rd Glass, while thd 
smaller jurisdictional Xalukd*rs of the Sankheda anl Paadet 

Mewas nave been graded in a nurd systematic manner with 
enhanced powers. 

59. In the new Constitutional Riforrm for the Govern- 
ment of the Indian Empire, a Chamber 
New Constitutional /» n • i i • j i 

Reforms. °* " flDceB " as ^ een inaugurated under 

the presidency of H, E. the Viceroy 
for the better administration of affairs relating to Native 



30 EBWA KANTHA DIBBCTORT. 

States of the Empire. The members of the Chamber are, 

(1) Rulers of States wbo enjoyed permanent dynastic 

salutes of 11 guns or over en 1st January 1920. 

(ii) Rulers cf States who exercise such full or practically 

full internal powers as in the opinion of the Viceroy 

qualify them for admission to the Chamber. 

(Hi) Representative Members as may be elected by th& 

smaller States under the Regulations. 

The Chamber is a deliberative, consultative and advisory, 
but not an executive body. 

60. In this Imperial Chamber of Princes, H- H, the 

Maharaja of Rajpipla is a Membar by 

Chamber of Princes, «,. , ,. , , ™ t 

reason ot his hereditary status as a First 

Class Prince, and the Rajas of Baria, Chhofea Udepur, Lunavada, 

Balasinor and Sunth are also Members under clause (ii) above. 

TChe Chief of Kadana has been giv9n the privilege of voting 

lor the nomination of four Representative Members for the 

Bombay Presidency, and has been himself elected as a 

Representative Member. These members will have a potent 

voice in the deliberations of the Chambor as affecting the 

interests and well-being of all the states of the Indian 

Empire. It may be hoped that the Princes and Chiefs 

will, in their turn and in due course, take their own 

subjects into their confidence in the administration of their 

respective states, end enlist their co-operation and help in 

all measures affecting the public weal, in the same way as 

the benign British Government has magnanimously done 

for the affairs of Native States as well as British Districts 
throughout the Empire. 

61. With such loyal and progressive Princes and 

Chiefs to guide the destinies of the 
people 5 and with oo-operation from their 
subjects in the task of government, there is a brighter 
luture in stcre for the Rowa Kantha Agency under the 
blessing of Providence and th? protecting shield of the 
BDfghty British Government. 



BBWA KA1STHA DIRECTOBT. 31 

OBSERVATIONS ON THE PRE3ENT SITUATION. 

62. In the present i\ra of democratic wave which hafr 

just sprung upon India for the first time, 

A few observations on 0vV ; no . j)o worldwide causes, and which 

^Zln™™:. has, Inter alia, overtaken the neighbouring 

British District ot Panoh Mahals, ik 
would not be oub of place to observe that some shortsighted 
and over zealous people seem to forget the blessings derived 
by India from British rule. If they would only calnly 
ponder over the condition of India before the advent 
of British rule, more than a century ago, they would 
find India to hnva been disunite J within herself, and 
separated into numerous divisions or principalities ruled over 

by innumerable Princes and Chiefs warring against eaoht 
other. There was no peace or security either to the people 

or to the Rulers, and there was no general educational systeno* 
or sanitation to speak of. No ond'a property or honour or 
faith was safe. Might was right. Safety or comfort was 
obtainable by enforced conversion to alien faiob or the 

sacrifice of daughters or sisters. The literates in a town 

could be counted on one's fingers, while the villages were 

entirely devoid of schools. Medical institutions and roads 
weie really non-existent. 

63. British brains and guidance have brought ladi* 

to its present pitch of civilization, which includes education* 
medical relief, roads, railways, posts, telegraphs, judicial 

courts, police protection, and above all a settled form o£ 
government. Various factories moved by steam, oil, or elec- 
tric pjwer have conn into existence. Tli3 ancient) arcs of 
India, such as painting, sculpture and areaitecourj are being^ 

reborn. Polioically, peopla who have never knowa anything bad 
despotic government for centurion, conducted by auo^ecatie Chiefs 
and their officers, are being helped towards the goal of self* 
government, for the fulfilment o£ which some preparatory 
training aud experience are a sine qua non. A too high jump* 
beyond the capability of the jumper is sure to bring ai* 
unpleasant and uncomfortable fall, which might break the* 
head or other limb of the impatient and reckless idealist. 



32 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORS 

64. All these are facts which ought to be borne in 
mind by all perscn? who wish to le fair to history and 
present circumstances, and who have no blind desire to 
declaim the Government, which has done so much for India, 
with jaundiced eyes and diseased minds. 

65. There may be defects and shortcomings in the 
administration, and no human agency is perfect under the 
sun, not even excepting the Indian Rulers, whose go vercment, 
by the eye, is swaraj built en old Indian foundations. But 
in weighing the pros and cons of every matter, advantages 

and disadvantages of a system, it is not fair to shut one 

eye, and to keep the other open, to ignore the numerous 

blessings derived by India from British Rule and its future 

possibilities for its good, and to exaggerate the defects and 
shortcomings only. 

66. All sane and sober persons, whe have had true 

knowledge and experience of the past and present conditions, 

firmly and conscientiously believe that the British Govern- 
ment has been a divine blessing to India, and is bound to be 

more and more beneficial to it and its people in the future, 
with the cooperation of its Princes and people, and this is 
the only way to raise it in the scale of nations. Non-Co- 
operation is a suicidal movement, and is bound to fail in the 
long mn. Nothing in the world is done without co-operation. 

The mighty British Empire is a concrete example of 
what can be Achieved by co-operation of all its component 

parts, i nd we ought to take a serious lesson from it, for in the 

pjtst history of India we have had a very bitter experience 

of non-co-of eraticn and disunion, of distentions and strifes. 

67 . There is no doubt that the Princes and people of 
Re^a Kantha will continue to pursue their loyal and pro- 
gressive course as they have done hitherto, and a brigater 
future is therefore assured. 

, Ra JKCT C. S. 

Dasexa,the 11th ^ L&DHABHAI H. Parmar. 

October 1921. 



4ppxndh. 32 (•) 

Appendix, 

Account of an incident which took place in March 1901 
showing the lawless character of the Bhils of th* Sunth 
Banswada border. 



After the great famine of Samvat 1956, A.D. 1899 1900, 
the Bbil ichabitants of Banswara commenced to c^me across 
the Sunth border and commit raids on tin Sunth villages 
and carry away cattle belonging to the Sunth State culti- 
vator*, who are also mostly Bhils. The attacking g*nga 
came in large numbers at nights, when the people were 
asleep in their detached huts, and were thus unable to combine 
and offer resistance or defend themselves and their property. 
The*e night attacks being repeated, tha Sunth Police O.'fioiaU 
naturally felt very uneasy and went to the Banswara villages 
to search for the stolen property and make remonstrances 
but were openly defied by the Banswara men. Several such 
attempts having proved fruitles?, the raids continued with 
vigour. Therefore, when the camp of the Political Ag?nfe f 
Mr. A. Wood, I. C. S., went to Sunth, the Police Superin- 
tendent of tha State made serious complaints about them, *md 
in order that his statements might be verified, he asked Mr. 
Wood to depute a Native Officer of the Agency, in cogmto, 
to accompany him to the Bansw*ra border, and see for 
himself how those Banswada men behaved when Sunth cfficiaU 
went there for search of stolen property ani to bring ths 
guilt home to them. Mr. Wood deputed m? as his Diitsrdar 
for the purpose, and the following is a truthful an J interesting 
account of what transpired, as reported by im at the time. 

'• I was deputed by you to accompany the Police 
inspector of the Sunth State across the Border, in order 
to test the accuracy of the complaint tint -'the Bails of the 
other side of the Bjrder, with the con ni Vance' or help of the 
local Darbar officials, did dot allow any search iti their hone* 



32 (t) BBWA %k$THA. DIBECTORT. 

• »-. • 

Jbr the indentifioation of property plundered from Sunt 1 ! 
limits and also to watch their action, when a searohin* party 
tried to make investigation in accordance with the recognized 
custom. Accordingly I joined the Police Inspector of Sunbh 
on the evening of the 24th instant at Fafcebpura and pro- 
ceeded to Ramjina Muwada under Biiiswara, which is one 
Kos distant from the Sunth vilUge oE Gagvs on the morning 
of Monday the 25th, and have now the Honour to submit 
the following report of what I observed and experienced on 
the occasion, 

" 2. The party reached the Muwada at about sunrise. 
When we came to near the ^ousa of one Bhil Kupla, who 
is said to be one of the persons suspected of possessing a 
large stock of plundered property, the Policeman in charge 
of the post was seut for. On enquiry it was found that 
the Policeman was at the time in the very house of the 
said Kuph, and on being called did n>t come out. One or 
two Bhils, however, immediately ran away from a back exit 
of the house and were observed to make a rattling noise 
with their mouths, and it wis followed by similar noises 
from the occupants of the other neighbouring houses, eoaoed 
from one hut to anoiher in quick succassion; the beating 
of the drum was immediately heard, and in quarter of au 
hour or so, the Bhils of the village emerged from their 
respective houses, armed with swords and arrows, and 
commenced their reception of us with abusive language. 
The whole population of the village, approximately 150 to 
200 in number, began to come forward anl attach us from 
all sides, although we shouted to th^m that they neei not 
be afiaid of anything and that they should hold themselves 
in patience. But our words had no effect, 

" 3. The Policeman did not come out at all, although 
repeatedly called by our men. My orderly Sowar Akram- 
khan asked him to come out before me, but he did nob 
comply with the request, although I was only 30 or 40 



TH8 BOBMB BHILS. 32 (e^ 

yards from him along with the Police Inspector. As he 
did not chose to show himself out of the hoa3e, so ne of 
the men of the party went inside the housa and said to 
him that as there were grwe reasons for balieviag that 
plundered property belonging to Sunth subjects was coacealed 
in the houses of several Bhils of the Mawada, he should 
render help in having it idenified by the camplaiaants or 
other persons. But he did not render any help or do 
an thing. Those who went into the house in which the 
Policeman was found, identified some of the property in the 
house, and saw a number of buflkbea ( i5 to 20) smd 
bullocks in that one house. Another hous9 which was close 
by also contained a large stock of animals and other property. 
While the Inspectar was endeavouring to seoure the 
<oo-operation and help of the only Darbar policeman on the 
spot, the Bhils of all th9 huts began to rush and throw 
arrows on us. The Sunth man had been strictly enjoined 
not to qse their weapons, and as a matter of fact, they 
obeyed these orders too faithfully, as far as my observation 
went. 

" 4. Seeing that the Bhils of the Muwada did not 
listen to our repeated requests to desist from attacking us, 
the Police Inspector and 1 considerel it advisable to retire. 
As we retraced our steps, the Bhils ran after us, and poured 
* shower of arrows from all sides. The Sunth Policemen 
and my orderly Sowar asked us to be permit ed to use their 
weapons in retaliation, but were firmly told to refrain and 
get out of the range of their arrows as speedily as possible* 
in order to avert bloodshed. 

•' 5. Our way back, however, lay through a ravine, 
ihe locality being rugged and intersected by hills and 
hollows, and we were thus specially open to the arrows of 
the Bhils from three aides. Several arrows passed over my 
bead and sides, and it was a most fortunate circumstance 
that I and my horse escaped being hurt. My orderly 



32 (d) BEWA KAKtti DfRBCTOBY, 

Sowar'a horse was however struck with an arrow, and the 
Sowar Akrarnkhan himself hit b/ another in his rigit wrist. 
Sunth Forest Ranger Harild, late Faujdar of the eastern 
division of Sun'h, who accompanied the Police Inspector 
for help in the investigation, was severely wounded. Hts 
horse was first struck with an arrow and got frightened and 
bolted, throwing Harilal down oa the ground in the ravine. 
The Muwada Bhila at once surrounded him and struck him 
with arrows and points of the arrows and swo'ds, and I 
heard that it was only after a great deal of eatreatifs and 
supplications^ th it he was allowed to go alive He mtnagad 
to return to Gugas in the heat of his wounds and the faar 
of being further wounded, but ha* since been confined to" 
bed *nd is unable to move. Ho has been brought into the 
Rampur Hospital and U-. under medical treat me it. Another 
Sowar of the Sunth Police had his horse frightfully damaged 
by arrows and is himself hit in his left arm, A man of 
the village of Gugas, who is said to have been complainant 
in a robbery case, is reportad to have bean killed on the w*y 
back, and it had not yet been possible to recover his bod/ 
till 4 o'clock yesterday, as it was surrounded by a larga 
crowd of armsd Bhils of the Muwada, and any attempt to 
recover it was considered hopeless without causing more 
bloodshed The Faujdar of Fa&ehpur has however addressed 
a letter to the Faujdar of Sal&kapat under Banswira qu 
this subject. 

" 6. From personal observation and actual experienc3 
of the incident above narrated, it appears to me plain that 
the Bhils of Ramjina Muwada are absolutely lawless and 
fiot under the control or restraint of anybody or fear of 
punishment. Had the Sunth Police or the complainant 
Bhils of this side of the Border been permitted or order.ed 
to use ..their weapcns, for they had the muskets loaded and 
their bows and arrows ready at hand, or had we stayed there 
another five minutes, I am eare eericus bloodshed would 



THE BORDER BHILS. 32 («) 

have been the result. The mission on which I was sent 
was simply to test the accuracy of the complaint of Sunth 
authorities that the Bhils of the border villages of Banswara 
had plundered large property from Sunth villages, and that 
they resisted all attempts to identify it. This being painfully 
too evident by a glance at the contents of two of the nearest 
houses, and by the violent behaviour of the villagers, coupled 
with the indifference of the only policeman on the spot, 
who is, I presume, expected by the Darbar to keep law and 
order among these free-booters, we thought it prudent to 
leave the locality as fast) as we could, in order to save the 
lives of the persons who accompanied us. 

" 7. I may mention that neither the Inspector, nor 
the Faujdar, nor myself entered any house in the Muwada; 
we were still in our saddles, and were enquiring of the 
Policeman, when the above attack was made. But th9 men 
who had entered one or two houses in search of the Police* 
man or for identifying the property reported that the houses 
seen by them were full of buffaloes, cows and bullocks, and 
a large number of them were observed by us from a distance 
near the houses of other Bhils, 



a 



8. I feel it my duty to bring to your notice that the 
Sunth Police and the complainant and other Bhils of Sunth 
villages who accompanied us displayed great moderation and 
patience under severe provocation caused by the injuries 
wantonly inflicted by unruly Bhils of the Muwada, and that 
it was only by the exercise of this prudent moderation that 
a serious bloodshed was averted in the prosecution of a legal 
measure of criminal investigation allowed to Police officers 
of neighbouring Native States. The Sunth party consisted 
of the Police Inspector, the Faujdar Harilal, 3 or 4 sowars, 
5 or 6 foot policemen, and about 15 other persons, being 
complainants or witnesses for identification of robbed property. 
At the most, our stay at the Muwada was for less than 
half an hour, and we 'had to return as soon as we found 



32 (f) BLAVA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

that we were confronted with a serious attack from the 
Bhils of the Muwada." 



Soon after this report was submitted, a demand was 
received from the Banswara officials by the Sunth State to 
the effact that the Sunth Police Officials had entered the 
limits of Banswara State with armed men for the purpose 
of loot and taken away property of the value of Rg. 750, 
and that in their pursuit, one robber was killed ! This demand 
was pressed, as time went on, but as the Sunth party was 
accompanied by me in my capacity as Daftardar to the 
Political Agent, Rewa Kantha, in cognito (of which the 
Banswara people were unaware ), simply to watch the proceed- 
ings, and as there was not the least intention on the part of 
Sunth officials or people to make a loot, the Banswara allegation 
was discredited and disproved. In fact there was no robbery 
at all, but on the contrary the Banswara people were the 
real offenders in making the attack and committing the murder 
of an innocent Bhil and wounding 4 or 5 other persona of 
the Sunth side. A Border Court was afterwards held and 
compensation awarded to the Sunth State on the basis of my 
official report of the the actual occurrence, and the guilty 
persons and officials of the Banswara State were given 
deterrent punishments. 

LADHABHAI H. Parmar. 

Note.— In 1912-13 the Border Bhils of Sunth, 
Banswara and other contiguous states and British Districts 
combined under the leadership of one Govindgar of Dungarpur 
and unfurled a banner of revolt for the purpose of establishing 
a Bhil Raj. They gave some trouble but were eventually put 
down with the help of Political Officers and military force. 
An account of this is given at page 24 supra. 





Captain H. H. MAHARANA SHRI VIJAYASINHJI, 
Maharaja of Rajpipla. 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 



STATHS — 1AJPIP1A. 5£- 



* "* 



SHORT ACCOUNT OF STATES. 

RAJPIPLA. 

( First Class State. ) 

Area...^ .....1,511k Square Miles. 

Population...- 161.606 ( 1911 ) 

168,454 ( 1921 ) 
Revenue 22,68,000 

The Chiefs of this state are Gohel Rajputs. It is 
situated on the extreme south of the Rewa Kantha. Of ancient 
history no details ars available, aud except that Ratanpur, 
a town in the west of the state, may be Ptolemy's mountain 
of agates, none of its settlements show traces of any great 
age. The territory consists of two tracts, plain and hilly. 
It seems probable that the rich lands along the Narbada. 
and the open western districts were included in the domains 
of the Anhilvad Kings, and at the close of the 13th century 
were overrun by Alaudin Khilji's generals (1295-1315). Early 
in the 14th century the ruling chief is said to have given 
his daughter in marriage to Mokhadji Gohel, the lord of 
Piram in the gulf of Cambay. In 1347, on the fall of Piram. 
and death of Mokhadji, his son Samarsi retired to Bhagwa 
in the Olpad subdivision of Surat, and, on the death of his 
maternal grandfather, succeeded to the chiefahip of Rajpipia. 

The establishment of a strong Musalman dynasty in 
Gujarat (1390) put an end to the independence of Rajpipia. 
With the decline of the Musalmans in the eighteenth century. 
Rajpipia raised its head, and the chief seems to have recovered 
most of the district which was wrested from his ancestors. 
Bub at this time a dangerous rival was found in the G*ikwar, 
who succeeded in imposing his interference in Rajpipia affairs. 

5 



*34 RKWA KAHTHA DIRECTORY. 

Ajabsing, a weak chief succeeded to the state on the 
tteath of his brother in 1786, and died in 1803. He had 
attempted to disinherit his eldest son Ramsing, and to secure 
the succession of his younger son Narsing, but the former 
was released from confinement and placed in power by the 
troops. From his intemperate habits, Ramsing however 
became incapable of ruling, and in 1810 the Gaikwar invested 
his reputed son Pratapaing and conferred on him the govern- 
ment of Rajpipla by a sanad, which the British Government 
agreed to guarantee. Nursing, brother of Ramsing, however, 
set up his claim to succeed on the ground that Pratapsing 
was not the son of Ramsing but suppositious and purchased 
l>y Ramsing's wife. The Gaikwar marched a force into the 
gantry, but the efforts of the Gaikwar i to settle the country 
were unavailing, and an investigation was therefore (undertaken 
hy the Resident at Baroda in 1819, and it resulted in the 
«tablbhment cf Narsing's claim and the admission by the 
Gaikwar of his right to the succession: but as Narsing was 
band and incapacitated from ruling, his eldest son Verisaljee 
was installed on the gadi on the 15th November 1821, and 
the Gaikwar relinquished his control over Rajpipla to the 
IBritish Government in the same way as in Kathiawar and 
Maiii Kantha. Verisaljee entered into an engagement binding 
feim and his successors to act in conformity with the advice 
*if the Bombay Government. He also agread to pay annually 
through the Bombay Government his tribute to the Gaikwar, 
Siassi Rs. 65,001, and to make an annual provision to Pra* 
tapsing who resigned all pretensions to the State. 

Verisaljee, when so invested, was a minor, and the British 
"Government undertook the manage nent of the State. He 
was entrusted with the administration in 1837. In 1852 some 
old disputes with the Gaikwar were settled by the mediation 
of the Bombay Government. In 1859, the Government of 
India decided that Rajpipla should pay to the Bombay 
-Government Ra 20,000 annually towards tha maintenance 



STATES— BAJPIPLA. . 5S 

of the Gujarat Bhil corps, which had been raised during tber 
Mutiny. This force was subsequently converted into a Police 
corps, but as no part of it was employed in Rajpipla, the 
Raja, was relieved from any demand on accountof its expenses 
from 1st May 1865. If however troops are employed in 
Rajpipla, the Raja is held liable to such a contribution for 
the time the trDops are so employed. 

Verisaljee's mismanagement compelled the Bombajr 
Government in 1855 to assume the administration for some 
years, but it was eventually restored to him. Verisaljee 
abdicated in 1860 in favour of his son Gambhirsing, still 
retaining, however, the principal share of government to hra 
own hands as minister of the State. DifFerencas however 
arose between father and son, and became so irreconcilable 
that in 1867 Government was obliged again to interpose and 
require Verisaljee to withdraw from all interference in Rvjpipfe* 
affairs. He died in 1868. Gambhirsing's management having) 
also not proved satisfactory, a British Officer was associated 
with him in the administration of the state from Aago#» 
1884 to 1887, when it Was found nwessary to deprire the 
Raja of all power. Gambhfrsidg died on the 10th January 
1887, leaving six sons, the eldest of whom Chhatrasingji 
was installed on the gadi on the 20th May 1867, and invested 
with full powers. He had received his education at that* 
Rajkumar College, Rajkote, and was assisted in the adminis- 
tration by his Dewan Khan Bahadur Dhanjiahah Edaljee* 
whose services were lent to the State from the Government 
I? e venue Department as Assistant Administrator in the time 
of British management. 

The state has come under British administration thrice 
during the last century, i. e. from 1891 to lb37; from 185£> 
to 1858, and from 1884 to 1897, and is consequently the 
most advanced among the Rewa Kantha states in all respects,. 
During the last period all departments were thoroughly re- 
organized, the revenue and judicial systems placed on a sound 



36 REWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

footing and finances improved. From the savings effected 
daring the British administration, the Ankleshwar-Nandod 
Railway, a length of 37 miles, was constructed at an appro- 
minate cost of 14 Lakhs of Rupees. It was opened for traffic 
in November 1899. 

H. H. Maharana Shri Chhatrasinhji died suddenly in 
Foona on the 26th September 1915 at the age of 54 years 
after a reign of 18 years. He was much beloved by his 
subjects, being a kind hearted ruler, simple ia habits and 
high in thoughts. In recognition of his wise and banefioenb 
rule he was invested by th9 Government with the tibia of a 
Knight Commandar of the Most Exalted Order of the Indian 
Empire. 

He was suoceeded by the present ruler, his son 
Maharaja Vijaysinhji, who was installed on the Gadi with 
full powers on 10th December 1915. Ha has two brothers 
Kumar Champaksinhji and Hiraatsinhji. 

During his regime many impDrtant changes and im- 
provements have taken place. Tue principal amongst these are, 

(i) the extension of the Rajpipla State Railway to 
about 2 miles from the old Nandod Station on 
the other side of the Karjan river to its present 
site, with a bridge across the river and costing 
about Rs. 2,50,000 

(ii) several principal and archtitectural buildings have 
also been erected, which adorn the Palace Road; 
and amongst these, the Hospital dedicated to 
the pious memory of Sir Ohatrasinhji and opened 
by H. H. the Gaekwar is a very imposing 
structure. 

(iii) The Maharaja's New Palace built on the villa 
style is chaste and has very neat dining and 
drawing rooms. 



STATES — RAJPIPLA. %T 

(iv) Another noticeable building that attracts attention 
en the s&me road is thn New Gymkhana which 
was opened by H. E. Lord Wellingdon. It has 
a very beautiful Polo Ground in front. 

(v) The sister Palaces, one used as a Guest House 
and the other as a Hiah School, are also very 
imposing structures. The total cost of these 
buildings and improvements has amounted to 
aboutRs. 6-J lacs. 

The town has also a good water supply, a complete 
installation of Electric lights and a Telephone System, and 
seems to be quite upto date in supplying the wants of the 
people. 

With a view to improve the means of communication 
between different towns and also to supply good drinking 
water to his subjects, His Highness has introdnced the levy 
o£ Local Cess, the proceeds of which, Rs. 60,000 per annum, 
are spent exclusively in improving roads, wells, and tanks 
chiefly for the use of the rural population of the State. 

The prospects of men employed in the public service 
are also much improved by raising the salaries and by the 
introduction of a pension scheme. Survey Settlement rates 
have also been applied to the whob Stjate. The Rani portion 
of the District as well as all. the Inam Villages have been 
brought under this system; the exactions of the Dumaldars 
have been curtailed, and the veth System altogether abolished. 
Codification of the existing laws has also taken place; several 
enactments and amendments have been introduced to simplify 
and systematise the administration of justice. The Maharaja 
has visited England both before and after his accession to 
the gadi and gives the benefit of his travels to his subjects 
in various ways. 

On the whole the State i« making a deoidely steady 
progress in all directions! and has a bright future before it. 



38 RBWA KANTHA DIBECTORY. 

The state rendered very valuable aid to the British Govern- 
ment in men and money in the recent great war. The salute 
attached to the Chiefship was raised by Government from 
11 to 13 guns permanently on the 1st January 1921. 

The State possesses one Hospital and 6 dispensaries, 
one High School and 38 Schools for the primary vernacular 
and english education of boys and girls. 

The military and police force of the State consists of 4 
guns, 40 horse and 275 Infantry or foot police. The Prince 
is entitled to be received and visited by the Viceroy and 
enjoys 1st class jurisdiction, i. e. unlimited power in civil 
matters, and in criminal has power to try, without permission 
from the Political Agent for capital offences, any person 
except British subjects. 





MAHARANA SHRI FATEH SINHJI, 
Rajaji of Chhota Udepur. 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 



STATES — CEEOTA UDEPUR. 3<fr 



CHHOTA UDEPUR. 



(SECOND CLASS STATE.) 

Area..., * 890 Square Miles 

Population 1 03,635 (1911 ) 

125,746 (1921) 
Revenue 10,00.000 

Chhota Udepur or Mohan is the first among the 2nd 
class States in the Rewa Kantha .Agency. The position is 
however disputed by the state of Baria which claims the 
precedence. Government have in a way recognized this claim 
by raising the present Prince of Baria in January 1921 by 
increasing his salute from 9 to 11 guns as a personal distinc- 
tion, over the head of Chhota Udepur, whose salute remains 
9 guns. 

The ruling family are Chohan Rajputs, who formeriy 
ruled at Pawagadh from 1244 to 1481. In the latter year 
Mahmad Begda, the renowned King of Gujarat, obtained 
possession of Champaner and expelled the Chohans, who 
repaired to the eastern possessions in the hills and established 
the principalities of Chhota Udepur and Baria, The founder 
of this state was Prithiraj, the grandson of the last Rajput* 
King of Champaner ( Pawagadh ). 

The following account gives a somewhat interesting 
origin and history of the family. 

The Rajas of Chhota Udepur and Baria belong to the 
Khichi Chohan clan o£ Rajputs, whose head, Anal, is said 
to have been created by Vasisth Muni out of the Agni Kund 
on Mount Abu. Ajayapal, one of Anal's successors, is said 
to have founded the city of Ajmere, and another successor,. 
Manikrai, who settled at Sambhar, handed down the title 
of Sambhari Rao, or Lord of Sambhar. The Khichi Choh*n& 



40 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

appear to have first settled in the Sind Sagar, and in the 
eleventh century we find Bir Bilander or Dharmagaj, one of 
the successors of Manikrai, defending Ajmere against Mahmud 
of Ghazni. His successor, Bisaldev, or Visaldev, flourished 
from 1010 to 1074 and founded the town of Visalnagar in 
North Gujarat. The line of his immediate successor culminated 
in the immortal Prithiraj Chohan, the celebrated hero of 
Chand's great epic, the Prithiraj R*so. After the death of 
Prithiraj oa the field of battle, the Kbichis settled in a part 
of Malwa which came to be called after them, the Khichi 
Vada. In 1300 Khichi Hamir, a descendent of Prithiraj, 
gallantly defended Ranthambhor against Alaudin Khilji, bat 
after the fall of this stronghold a large body of Khichis 
migrated to Gujarat, and there in 1244 A. D., under the 
leadership of Palanshi, conquered the kingdom ofOhampaner 
and its dependencies, which remained in the Palanshi family 
for no less than eleven generations. But in 1484-85, after 

[ a prolonged seige of twelve years, the fortress of Cnampauer, 
gallantly defended by Patoi Rawal, also known as Pratap- 
sinh, who was then the reigning prince, fell at last by a 
combination of treachery and stratagem, to the renowned 
Sultan Mahomed Begda of Ahmedabad. The story goes 
that the Raoi's brother-in-law treacherously joined the 
Mahomedans and, leading the Rajput Prince to believe that 
he was seeding a supply of grain for the garrison, managed, 
under that pretence, to convey into the fort, hidden in 
sacks, some one or two thousand ( for, the accounts are not 
definite) armed men. The defeat of the garrison folbwed, 
and was signalized by the capture of the unfortunate Prinde 
and his minister Doongarsinh. Sooner than renounce their 
faith and become converts to Islam, the option given them, 
if they wished to preserve their lives, they chosa death and 

| were both baibarously murdered, their bodies afterwards 
being exposed on stakes. On the capture of Champaner the 
two surviving sons of Patai Raol escaped. Prithviraj founded 
the state of CbhotvUdepur, while Doongerji founded that 



STATES — CHHOTA UDEKJB. %1 

of Baria. According to bardic accounts the elder son escaping 
from Champaner settled at Hatnph, a small out of the way 
hamlet on the right bank of the Narbada. Laffc unmolested 
in this wild country f ha and his descendants established 
claims of tribute over a large part of east Gaj*rat, and 
later on, in the decay of the authority of the Ahm3dabad 
Kings ( 1540-1572) were able to spread their power and 
move their headquarters to Mohan in a richer and les* 
remote part of the country. Commanding th9 pass into the 
difficult tracts on the b*nks of the Narbada, the site was 
well chosen, and it* ruins now in existence show that Mohan 
was once a place of considerable importance. 

In course of time, during the further decay of Mogul 
power in the early part of the 13th century, th9 capital 
was moved twenty miles north to Chhota-Udepur on the 
banks of the Or river. The site was well suited for trade, 
but it was a. place of no strength, and the Chiefs were, 
before long, forced to pay tribute to the Gaekwar, 

This state thus became a tributary to the Gaikwar, 
previous to the advent of the British Government. Ovving 
to a doubt whether the political control of Chhota Udepur 
was transferred to the British Government in 1820 along 
with that of the petty states in Mahi Kantha, an agreement 
was made in 1822, by which the Gaikwar surrendered his 
control, and the state became subject to the British Govern* 
ment, paying under guarantee, an annual tribute of Siasahi 
Rs. 10,500 to the Gaikwar. This tribute wa3 in 1871 re* 
duced to Gaikwari Rs. 10,1 47-9 -0=Goverament Rs. 8,76M8-4„ 
in the course of a settlement of certain disputes between 
the two States. 

The town of Chhota-Udepur w*s the scene of one of 
Tantia Topi's severest defeats in the mutiny of 1858, 
a description of which has been given in the $ccoqji)fc 
of Rewa Kantha in the preceding pages. 

Prithiraj, with whom the above engagement was male, 
6 



4$ KBWA KAflTHA DIRECTORY. 

was succeeded by Gumansing, and he by his nephew Jitsing, 
who died in July 1881 and was succeeded by his son Motising, 
who died in 1895 after a reign of 14 years. The present 
Chief, Maharawal Shri Fatehsing, son of Motising* has 
received his education in the Rajkumar College, Rajkot, and 
was placed on the Gadi and invested with the powers of the 
State in March 1906. Daring his minority the administration 
of the State was conducted by a Government Administrator 
under the supervision and orders of the Political Agent. 

This State, like Raj pi pi a, came under Agency manage- 
ment thrice, from 1S54 to 1855. from 1881 to 18 84, and 
from 1895 upto 1903. Bat the administration did not 
last for long periods as in case o£ Rajpipla. Maharaval Shri 
Fatehsingji, the present ruler, was born on the 23rd October, 
1884, and is thus 37 years of age. Ha has 2 sons and 5 
daughters. During his regime many improvements have 
been made in the State. The revenue system has been 
assimilated to the neighbouring British and Baroda Districts. 
Electric light has been introduced into the town, and the 
Districts or Mahals have been connected by telephone with 
the capital. The State possesses 3 Hospitals, oae for men, 
one for women and one for cattle and horses; 4 dispensaries, 
one English school and 30 schools for primary vernacular 
education of boys and girls. It has also a printing press 
and a library for the public. The employes of the State 
have been given the privilege of pension rules as in the 
state of Rajpipla. 

The State enjoys 2nd Class jurisdiction, that is, 
unlimited civil powers, and in criminal mutters pDwar to try 
all but foreign subjects for capital offence. Io has no 
military force but a body guard and Polica. Ta9 Caief 
*ecdives a salute of 9 guns. The right of adoption wa* 
conferred upon him in 1830. Giahota Udepur is connected 
by its own Railway with the Bxleli Terminus of the 
Baroda Railway of His Highness thrGaekwar. which is 22 
miles in length. 



^ 



*#$ 




Captain H. h. MAHARAOL SHRI 

Sir Ranjitsinhji, K.C.S.I., Rajaji of Baria. 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 




Capt. H. H. MAHARAOL SHRI Sir RANJITSINHJI, K.C.S.I., 

Rajaji of Baria. 
(In Military Uniform) 



A27.*U L.-ikshnii Art, Bombay. S 



STATES — BARIA. 4£ 



BARIA. 



Second Class State. 

Area ,....813 Square Miles. 

Population. ..„ 1,15 % 201 (1911 ) 

1,31,289 ( 1921 ) 
Revenue 9,50,000 

The Baria family is descended in the younger line 
from the common ancestor of the Chhota-Udepur family 
and are Chohan Rajputs. The founder was Dungarsi 
cr Dungarsing, the brother of Prithiraj, the first Chief of 
Chhota-Udepur. The State was established after the fall of 
Champaner about the end of the 15th century. The des- 
cendants of Dungarsing reigned for 12 generations at B\ria, 
and consolidated their power by the subjection of other 
chiefs around, while they themselves were protected from 
external foes by the strength of the country, a series of 
low hills densely obstructed by jungle. 

The chronicles are somewhat vague at this point in 
the history of the State, but we eventually find that, on 
the death of Mansinh, one cf the successors of Doongersing, 
the State was left with a widowed Rani and a young son. 
The government was seized by an usurper, the Rant and 
her son, Prithiraj, taking refuge maaawhile with the Raol 
of Dungarpur, the queen's father, thider their friendly 
protection Prithiraj stayed for twelve years, returning to 
Baria in 1782. Taking arms, he drove out the usurper 
and built the present town of Devgad- Baria. 

The Baria State from the very beginning had a 
severe struggle for its existence aiid for the maintenance cf 
its ind9pandeace, and its effjrts were successful It never 
paid tribute or acknowledged subordination to either the 



44 REWA KANTEA DIRECTORY. 

Musalman or the Mahratha Government. Indeed, so far 
from paying tribute, the State actually levied chauth from 
three of Scindia's own districts in the Panch Mahals ; named 
Dohad, Halol, and Kalol. The chauuh in 1819 was com- 
muted to a money payment, and the British Government 
undertook to pay the same direct to the State, recouping 
itself by deducting the amomt of the chauth from the tribute 
which the State of Lunawada paid to Ssindia through them, 

Prithviraj left four sons and two daughters. Rayadharji 
succeeded to the throne, and four or five rulers followed, 
whose reigns call for no comment. At the beginning of the 
nineteenth century (1803) when Jasvvatsinhji was the reigning 
pricce, we find the Biria Raj loyally co-operating with the 
British Government, when Doulatrai Scindia's districts in 
d-ujarat were taken possession of by a British force under 
Colonel Murray. Mr. J. P. Willoughby, the Political Agent 
in Rajpipla, in his report dated somy twenty three years 
later, remarks : — u The success of that campaign appears to 
** have been materially facilitated by the friendship and good 
* s will displayed towards us, by the Rijah of Baria, who 
*' was considered the principal of the Btieei Rajahs to tae 
** northward of the Nerbudda. The conduct pursued by the 
** Baria Government throughout this campaign called forth 
€€ the warmest thanks and praises of the commanding officer, 
*• and a treaty was entered into by us, subsidizing a detach- 
** ment of the Baria Baeels at a monthly expense of Rs. 
*' 1.800. This secured the friendship and co-operation of 
c * this tribe and enabled our convoys and detachments to 
*' pass through the country without molestation." In one 
<jf his reports the Colonel observes :-" The friendship of the 
m Baria Raja has in a particular manner favoured us. His 
** country is a continuei chain of defiles for many miles, he 
— has permitted me without molestation to occupy these 
* defiles, and has promised his whole force, should an 
^' enemy attempt to penetrate by that route, which is the 
m only good road into Gujarat." On another occasion hs 



TATBfi — BAIUA. 45 

reports : — u Major Holmes speaks in high terms of the 
" friendship he has experienced in his march through the 
€i country of the Raja of Bam." In return for this friendly 
aid the Colonel proposed to cade to the Raja whatever 
districts might ba conquered to the east of Baria in the 
direction of Ujjain and also the districts of Jhalod, in lieu 
of certain claims upon the other districts conquered from 
Scindia on this side of India. Though these intentions wara 
never carried into effect owing to the political adjustments 
of treaty between the British and tha Gwalior Governments, 
the foregoing exhibits in a very favourable light the attitude 
of the Baria Raj towards the British Government and of 
its fidelity and good will, and aftbrd3 a signal proof that in 
proportion to its ability it has on every occasion shown itself 
to be a useful ally of the British Government. It should be 
mentioned that the aid and assistance referred to ware rendered 
by the Baria State at considerable risk to itself, as it thereby 
incurred the enmity of its powerful neighbours, who possassed 
means and opportunities for destructive visitations into Baria 
territory. The British Government were not slow to recognise 
all this and ensured the integrity of the State under th* 
treaty of Sirji Anjangaon. 

Jaswatsinhji was succeeded by Gangdasji, in whose 
reign there was a good deal of trouble owing to the treachery 
of a Brahmin, named Naranji Dive. Gangdas died in 1819, 
and his minister, Rupji, a brother of Naranji Dave, took 
the reigns of government in his own hands, and depjsed for 
a time Prithviraj, the righttul heir, in f tvour of a substitute. 
The British Government, however, intervened and placed 
Prithviraj on the throne. Prithviraj reigned no less than 
forty four years, and was greatly beloved by his people. Hs 
passed away in 1864, 

His son, Mansinhji, the father of the present Raja, 
succeaded him. He was only nine years of aga at his fathers 
death, and the State, during the minority, was managed by 
the Bombay Government. The young Ohiofa eitmtioi was 



46 R1WA KJLHTHA DIRECTORY. 

carefully looked after on modern lines, and when the Baria 
ruler succeeded to the gadi in November 1876, one of his 
first thoughts was to raise the educational standard of his 
people. He founded a number of vernacular schools, and 
among other improvements, opened an experimental farm, 
which Was put under the management of a practical agri- 
culturist. This institution is doing splendid service, and i^ 
in a highly flourishing condition. The improvemant of the 
various breeds of cattle is a matter which received much 
attention, and works of public utility also engaged the earnest 
attention of th" State. He was a keen and skilled huntsman, 
and his sportman-like qualities and his great kindness to his 
people made him an extremely popular ruler. Ha visited 
Bombay when the present King, then Prince of Wales, came 
to India, and he was also present at the DAhi Durbar in 
1903. His death took place after a shirt illn9S3 on the 29th 
February 1908, his surviving children bnng two sons, Ranjit- 
siohji and Naharsinbji and one daughter by name Suraj- 
kunvarba. 

The present Ruling Prince, Maharaval Shri Ranjitsinhji 
received his education at the Rajkurnar Collage at Rajkot in 
Kathiawar, where his diligence in his studies earned £>r him 
golden opinions. He also served his time in the Imperial Gadeb 
Corps, His education received the last touch by a pretty 
long stay in a first rate educational institution in England. 

From his boyhood the Raja Saheb displayed in a 
marked degree the hereditary knack and pluck in all manly 
sports. He is a splendid pigsticker as evidenced by his win- 
ning the Salmon, Gujarat and Sir Pratap Cups in keen 
contests with veteran and astute pig-stickers. His prowess 
as hunter of big game may be judged from the fact that he 
has already bagged almost a hundred panthers and tigers, 
and a very large number of bears, elephants and lions. 

His installation en the gadi tx>k place in 1908, and 
for the cnerbus duties of ruler he was prepared by careful 




Pi 
< 

03 

h 
< 

O 

< 

< 
Oh 

w 

H 



8? 

S 
O 



41 

a 

Hi 



s 



STATES — BARIA. 47 

tuition in administrative work under the guidance of the 
experienced Divan Mr. Harilal M. Parekb. His Highness 
is one of the best types of the Indian Rulers brought up on 
modern lines. 

During the first quinquennium of his rule the young 
Raja Saheb has founded many public institutions in the 
State, namely, Hospital for women and children, Veterinary 
Hospital, Gymkhana, Town Hall, etc. Education in both 
English and Gujarati is made free throughout the State. He 
evinces active and keen interest in the welfare of his subjects. 
He was appointed Hon. A.D.C to His Excellency the Rt. 
Hon. Lord Willingdon, Governor o£ Bombay. 

He offered his personal services to Government in the 
Great European War and saw active sarvica in Flanders and 
France. He enjoys the rank of Captain of the British army, 
and his personal salute has recently been raised from 9 to 11 
guns on 1st January 1921. 

He is married to a sister of the present Maharaja cf 
Rajpipla, and the happy union is blessed with a son and 
daughter. 

The State force consists of 3 guns, 24 horse and 
about 211 infantry or foot police. 

The right of adoption was conferred on the Raja in 
1890. The State edjoys 2nd class jurisdiction, that is, un« 
limited civil powers and in criminal matters power to try 
all but foreign subjects in capital offences. This State appears 
to have come under Agency management once i. e. from 
1864 to 1876. But the passage of the B. B. & C. I. 
Railway through its territory and continued good adminis- 
tration under its rulers have enabled the State to develop 3 
its resources and attain a high degree of prosperity. 

Tha State possesses 3 hospitals at the capital t;wa, 
one for men, one for women and one for cattle, and 
three dispensaries, one High School and 15 Schools for tha 
primary vernacular education of boys and girls. 




H. H. SIR VAKHAT SINHJI K. C. S. I., 
Rajaji of Lunavada. 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 



STATES— LUNAVADA. 4* 

LDNAVADA. 



( SECOND CLASS STATE). 
Area*....,.* 388 Square Miles. 

Population 75 998 (1911). 

83,242 (1921). 

Revenue Rs. 4,50,000. 

The Chiefs of the Lunawada family belong to the 
Solanki clan of Rajputs, and claim descent from Sidhraj, 
who ruled in Anhilwad Patau from the year 1094 to 1143 A. D. 

It is said that the founders of this State first established 
themselves at Virpur ( now belonging to Balasinor ) about 
A, D. 1225. In 1434 the family removed to Lunawada, 
having in all probability been driven across the Mahi by 
the increasing power of the Mahomedan Kings of Gujarat, 
though local legends attribute the removal to a saintly 
prediction. 

The first connection of the Bombay Government with 
this State was formed in 1803, when the British troops 
entered Sindhia's possessions in Gujarat. A guarantee of 
the protection of the Bombay Government was given to the 
Raja, and a treaty was afterwards made with him, by which 
he became tributary to the Bombay Government Bud, on 
the change of policy adopted by Lord Corn wallis, this treaty 
was dissolved. From that time there was little intercourse 
with Lunawada till 1812, when a settlement of the Gaikwar's 
claim was made. After the Pindari war in 1819 an engage- 
ment was mediated between the Sindhia and Raja Fatehsing, 
by which the payment of Sindhia's tribute of Babasai Rs: 
12,000 was guaranteed on condition that Sindhia would nob 
interfere directly or indirectly in the afiairs of the state. The 
tribute is now payable to the Bombay Government under 

the treaty with the Smdhia of the 12 th December 1880. 
7 



50 BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Fatehsing was succeeded by Dalpatsing, adopted by 
Fatehsing's widow, and he in 1852 by Dalelsing, a collateral 
heir nominated by Government. Dalelsing had no issue, and 
his request that he might be permitted to adopt was granted 
in 1866 on payment of Nazaraaa, and on the understanding 
that the selection should meet with the approval of Govern- 
ment. Dalelsing died in 1867, and Wakhatsing, the present 
Chief, was adoptad by his widow according to his wishes. 
He being a minor at the time, the State was taken under 
British management. On his attaining majority, it was 
handed over to him on 28th August 1880. Maharana Shri 
Wakhatsing had received his education in the Rajkumar 
College at Rajkot. In 1889 he was appointed K. C I. E. f 
and in 1890 he received a sanad o£ adoption. Unfortunately 
he had a severe attack of paralysis in August 1896, from 
which he has not been able to fully recover. His limb3 
and speech have been affected, but he still retains his faculties. 
The Chief, however, has a capable and wise heir-apparent, 

Kumar Shri Ranjitsing, who conducts the administration 
with intelligence and tact. 

In recognition of the continued good administration 
of the State, Government have been pleased to raise the 
salute of the Chief from 9 to 11 guns as a personal distinc- 
tion on the 1st January 1921. 

Lord Reay, Governor of Bombay, paid a visit to the 
Chief at his capital in 1889. The State has b9en und jr 
Agency management once, i. e., frjn 1867 to 1830. Lunavada, 
the capital of the State, is a flourishing town of 10,000 
inhabitants, mostly wall-to-do ani hghtf classes of Hindus. 
It is the centre of local trade and is connected with Golhra 
by a branch of the Gujarat Railway. 

Maharana S iri Sir Wakhatsing was born on the 28th 
August 1861 and had two sons, Ranjitsing, the heir-appa- 
rent, an4 Rugnathsing, who died in the prime of life. 

The state has two Dispensaries, one High School and 
13 Schools for the primary education of boys and girls. 



STfTIf— &AL4SXN0S. 5 J 

BALASINOR. 

( SECOND CLASS STATE). 
Area.* # 189 Square Miles, 

p 7 ,. 140,563(1911) 

Population^ \44W3 (1921) 

Revenue Us. t>68fl00. 

This is the only Mahomedan State of importance ia 
the Rewa Kantha Political Agency. The family of the chief 
of this State is descended from Sardar Mahmadkhan, fourth 
in descent from Sherkhan B*bi I who was made " BABI" 
(Doorkeeper) of the Imperial Court, a patronymic which 
the members of the family still hold. Sherkhan wa3 subsequently 
commandant of the Koli district of Chunwal on the 
northwest of Ahmedabad. 

In the general scramble for powar and independence on 

the disruption of the Mogul Empire, Sardar Mahmadkhan 

Babi remained contented with the district of Balasinor, and 

Was allowed to do so on condition of his paying tribute to 

the Gaekwar iu 1761. The members of the other branches 

of the Babi family secured to themselves the territorial 
forming the States of Juuagadh, Radhanpur and Bantwa. 

Sardar Mahmadkhaa was succeeded by his son Salabat- 
khan. It was duriug his life time th it the control over the 
State came into the hands of the British Government. Both 
the Peshwa and the Gaekwar had previously established their 
rights of tribute over Balasincr. Those of the former 
became transferred to the British Government in 1817 A. D. $ 
wbib those of the latter came under tha general settlement 
between the Mahi Kantha tributaries and the Gaekwar in 
1820 A. D, This State wa3 under the Collector of Kaira 
till 1853, when it was transferred to the charge of the 
Political Agent, Rewa Kantha. 

After a peaceful reign of half a century, JorawarKhan, 
the third successor of S&labat Khan, died in the year 1382. 



5$ BBWA KANTHA biMHCTOM. 

His name has been' held in respectful memory by 
bis subjects for his remarkable kindness and generosity. He 
was succeeded by his son, Manawarkhan, who was 36 years 
of age at the time of his accession. Though this Ruler had 
not had any English education, yet hi3 natural desire to 

rale his subjects justly and kindly impelled him to inaugurate 

a number of measures calculated to improve the material 

prosperity of his subjects. It was during his reign that the 
long standing dispute regarding the Parg%na of Virpur con- 
sisting of 42 villages and some lands between Balasinor and 

Lunawada, was brought to an amicable termination. In 1890 

A. D. a sanad was conferred upon him guaranteeing 

him succession in his family according to Mahomedan law 

of inheritance in the event of the failure of natural heirs. 

Nawab Manawar Khan died in 1899 A. D , when his 

son the present Nawab Saheb Jamiabkhan, a child of five 

years, was duly installed on the Masnad. During his minority 
the State remained under British Administration uptill 3 1st} 

December 1915, when the investiture ceremony took place, 

and the full reins of administration were handed over to 
him. He is now running the sixth year of his reign. 

The present Nawab Saheb has received his education 

in the Rajkumar College, Rajkot. He has also received his 

military training at the Imperial Ca let Corps, Dehra Dun. 

Survey settlement has bean introduced in this State, and 

a light acreage is the only tax on cultivators, who are assisted 
by the state in various ways. A seheme is said to have been 

prepared for irrigation works, and also a Railway that might 

benefit che whole State, out want of mousy is an important 
factor hr consideration. 

Free Primary Education is also a booa conferred by 
the present) ruler, wno is said to be anxious to inaugurate 
all reforms tint! mig.it prepare ais subjects for heavier re- 
sponsibilities, but his regime hitherto has nob b^en without 
trouble of some sort or other. 

The so called military force of the State coasists of 101 

Infantry and 16 Cavalry, who are pracftioally policeman, and 
10 pieces of artillery. 




MAHARANA SHRI JOR AVARSINHJI,, 
Rajaji of Sunth-Rampnr State.. 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay H 



■STMiwuftra. 5S l 



SONTJj. 



(SECOND CLASS STATE)/ 

ilria«..t«»,„M»„ m o # „,», **+...394 Square Miles. A 

Population ..59.351 (1911). 

70,964 (19&1). 
Revenve*.. ......Rs.2,55fl00. 

The ruling family in Sunth belongs to the Powar or 
Parmar casta of Rajputs, and is believed to have come 
originally from Ujjain and to have first settled at Jhalod, and 
finally about the thirteenth century at Sunth. The founder 
of the family was Sanfc, who, with his brother Limdev, was 
forced to leave Jhalod and established himself at Sunth* 
Limdev established himself at Kadaua. A treaty was 
concluded by the Bombay Government with this State in 
1803, but it was subsequently dissolved by the policy of 
Lord Cornwallis, which was adverse to the system of 
alliances with petty Rajput Chiefs. The Ghief of Sunth 
was included in the engagement mediated between Sindhia 
and Lunawada, and the payment of his tribute of Rs. 7,009 
Government Rs. 5,385 was guaranteed to Sindhia on condition 
of the latter abstaining frjm all interference in the affairs of 
this State. It is now paid to the British Government under 
the Treaty with the Sindhia dated 12th December I860. 

Raja Bhawanising died without issue in 1872, leaving, 
as it was alleged, a will, by which he designated Prithising, 
one of his Bhayafc, as his successor. Enquiry showed that the 
alleged will could not be regarded as a true record of the > 
wishes and intentions of the late Ctnef, and that Prithising 
Was neither a fit person nor the nearest of kin. The widow 
of the Chief was therefpre allowed to select one from amangst 
the collaterals. Her choice fell upon Pratapsing and was ' 



•"•'$£ BBWA KANTHA DIBECTOBY. 

confirmed by the Bombay Government on payment of 
Nazarana of a year's revenue. The right of adoption was 
conferred on the Baja in 1890. Fratapsing died in January 
1896, without any sen and without adopting any person. 
Government selected Jorawarsing, a lad of the Babrol branch 
of the Bhayats, as successor to the Gadi. The elder Rani 
wished to adopt Chadansing of the Hirapur branch, but 
her request was not granted by Government. Jorawarsing, 
the present Chief, was placed on the Gadi of Sunth by the 
Political Agent in public Darbar on the 3 1st August 1896, 
and the Sardars acknowledged him as their Chief by the 
presentation of the usual Nazar. From 1896 to 1902 the 
State was administered by Government owing to his minority. 
He was formally invested with full powers on the 10th May 
1902. He was educated in the Rajkumar College at Bajkot 
and was associated with the Government Administrator in 
the management of the State for more than a year, prepa- 
ratory to his being invested with full powers. 

Maharana Shri Jorawarsinhji was first connected by 
marriage with a daughter cf the Rajadhiraj of khahpura in 
Rajputana. After the death of this lady he married a 
daughter of late Raoji Saheb of Kanod in Meywar. By 
this second marriage he has two children, one Kunvri and 
one Kumar, heir to the Gadi, aged 14 years. 

The towns of Sunth and Bampur are connected with 
the B. B. & 0. I. Railway on the south by a made road, 
80 miles in length, and also with the Godhra-Lunawada 
Railway on the west by a third class road of about 18 
miles. 

The sanctioned military force of the State consists o£ 

2 field and 2 other guns, 105 cavalry and 213 infantry and 

jolice, but this force is practically Body-guard and policemen. 

The regime of Maharana Shri Jorawarsinhji has been 
anything but a bed of roses. Famines, lean years, extra- 



STATES— SUNTH. 5$ 

ordinary heavy oxpenses towards the marriages of the 
daughters of the late Raja Pratapsinhji, have made the 
financial condition of the State far from satisfactory , bub 
wise management has bean instrumental in keeping its head 
up. 

Lastly in 1913, a Banjara named Grorindgar of Rozia 
under Idar, under the propaganda of religious raformi, unfurled 
a standard of revolt and tried to establish a Bhil Raj 
on Mangadh, a hill on the Sunth-Banswara north-easb 
border. A larga numbar of Bails from Sunth, Banswara, 
Dungarpur, and other surrounding places, gathered together, 
on Mangadh and committed some acts of violence. The 
situation having become very grave, the Political Agent Mr. 
Hudson, who was promptly at the scane with the Commissioner 
N. D , requisitioned the military who dispersed the rebels. 
The guilty leaders were arrested, tried and punished. 

The Chief receives a salute of 9 guns. The State has 
2nd Class Jurisdiction, i. e., unlimited powers in civil cases 
and in criminal matters, power to try all but foreign 
subjects for capital offences. It has been under Government 
management twice i. e., from 1872 to 1881 and from 1896 to 
1902. The town of Sunth is 30 miles away from B. B. & 
C. I. Railway. This fact, with the backward condition of 
its inhabitants, retards its full devalopimnt. 




I* 




RANA SHRI CHHATRASALJI, 
Chief of Kadana. 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 



STATES— KADANA. 5f 



KADANA. 



(THIRD CLASS STATE.) 

Area. ~...130 Square Miles 

Population...*. 12,510 (1911) 

15,377 (1921) 
Revenue 77.000 

This State was formerly in the fourth but now 
ranks 3rd Class. It wa3 established about) the middle of 
the 13th century as a separate Taluka by Limdev, a 
younger brother of Powar Sant, the founder of Suntb. 
Since then, inspite of its small size, the wildness and 
poverty of the country and the bravery of its Bhil 
inhabitants have saved it from being swallowed up by its 
larger neighbours or being forced to pay tribute to the 
paramount power. Except that it was always at war with 
Sunth, Dungarpur or Balasinor, nothing of the history of 
Kadana was known till the accession of the late Chief 
Farbatsing. He was not on good terms with Raja 
Bhawanising of Sunth, who claimed sovereignty over him 
and complained to the Political Agent that the Thakor 
had introduced an infant into his house as his own son. 
The Thakor admitted that the child was not his. He 
however pleaded that it belonged to the family and that 
the other members of the Bhayat were willing that it 
should be adopted as his heir. The Raja failed to prove 
that lie had any power to interfere with the Kadana Chief. 
Under these circumstances Government allowed the Thakor 
to adopt the child and declared his state independent of 
Sunth in 1871. 

The adopted son died on 15th June 1886 and another 
boy from a Bhayat's family was adopted with the sanction of 
Government, Thakor Parbatsing died in 1889 and was 

8 



38 BBWA KA5THA DIRECTORY. 

succeeded by the adopted son Chhatrasalji, the present 
ruler who was a minor at the time. Daring his minority, 
the State was managed by the Agency until 1901, when 
the Thakor Chhatrasalji was installed on the gadi by the 
Political Agent in public Darbar and invested with the 
powers of the State. 

Thakor Chhatrasalji was born on the 28 th January 
1879 and educated in the Talukdari Girasia School at 
Wadhwan. He signalized the commencemenb of his ad- 
ministration by the establishment of a Dispensary, which 
has been a great boon to his wild Bhil subjects The Dis- 
pensary has been named *' Oarmichael Dispensary.'* He 
has ruled the state wisely and well, and in appreciation of 
his specially good administration Governmant ware pleased 
to promote him from the 4th to the 3rd Class permanently. He 
is thus entitled to a formal visit to and from rf. E the 
Governor and the Political As:ent. 



•o 



Rana Shri Chhatrasalji has received the unique distinction of 

Ji feino- elected as a Representative Member of the Imperial Chamber or* 

Princes at Delhi by the smaller states of the northern part of the 

Bombay Presidency, the 1st and 2nd class Princes being Ordinary 

Members of the Chamber in virtue of their rank and position. 



s^r 




RANA SHRI RANJIT SINHJI, 
Thakor of Bhadarwa. 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 



STATES— BHADAEWA. 59* 

BHADARWA. 

( FOURTH CLASS STATE.) 

Area 27 Square miles. 

Population ...... 8 ; 885 (1911). 

9,568 (1921). 
Revenue 60,000 

This is a Fourth Class State in the Rewa Kantha Agency. 
The Thakore, who is a Waghela Rajput, claims descent 
from Karan Waghela, the last Waghela. Ruler of Gujarat. 
The founder cf the house is Wagela Lunkaranji who cap- 
tured Angadh near the bank of the river Mahi from the 
Kolis and became the ruler of 120 villages in Samvat year 
1335, A. d 1279. Subsequently, in the Samvt year 1579, 
A. D. 1523, the head quarter was shifted from Angadh to 
Jaspur, wherefrom it was again shifted to Bahidhara in 
Samvat year 1733, a. d. 1677. By this tinn mast of the 
villages were taken away from the Thakores in the times 
of the Moguls and Maratha invasions, som9 were aiven as 
Jiwai to Bhayats and a few only were preserved as belong- 
ing to the state. 

In Samvat 1778, a. d 1722, Rana Adesingji quarreled 
with his mother, and shifted the Gadi to Bhadarwa. Ade- 
singji was succeeded by his son Dalpat*inji in Samvat 1837, 
a. d. 1781, who was soon after succeeded by his sonPratap- 
singji in Samvat 1839, a d, 1783. 

Pratapsingji died in Samvab 1881, A. d. 1825, without 
leaving any male issue, and hence a dispute about succession 
arose between Jamalsingji and Sardarsingji, the two adopted 
son* of the widows of the deceased Thakore, Thakarani 
Takhatba who had adopted Jamalsingji took protection under 
Baroda Government, who taking advantage of the occasion * 
secured some further rights about tribute etc #> and recognizsd. 



. '€0 REWA KAHTHA DIBECTORT. 

Jamalsinpji as the proper claimant for the Gadi. Sardarsingji 
then took to outlawry and began to harass the ryots, and 
took possession of Vankaner village. The British Government 
at last intervened, and settled the dispute between the two 
brothers through the appointment of a Punch in the year 
1833 A, D. According to this settlement, Sardarsingji was 
allowed to retain Vankaner as Jiwai. 

During the period of the quarrel between the two 
brothers, the tribute payable to the Baroda Governmeut had 
fallen in arrears, and the Taluka in consequence was taken 
under management by the Baroda Government In 1840 a. d. 
Thakor Jamalsingji died and his adopted son Vajesingji 
fought for succession, but the British Gjvernment did not 
recognize him, and declared Sardarsingji as the proper 
claimant. Vankaner was then joined to Bhadarwa by 
Sardarsingji, who became the sola ruler of the whole State. 
The attachment on the Taluka by the Baroda Government 
on account of the arrears of tribute was still in force, and 
was removed afterwards only through the pressure of the 
British Government. The management of the Taluka was 
however continued for some time by the British Gavernment 
on account of the arrears of tribute. 

Sardarsingji died in Samvat 1936, A. d. 1880, and a 
quarrel about succession again arose between his two sons 
Adesingji and Fatehsingji. Adesingji was recognized as the 
senior claimant. Adesingji died in Samvat 1944, a. d. 1888, 
without any male issue, and Fatehsingji was recognized as 
successor by the British Government, Fatesingji ruled for 
neaily 24 years and died without a male issue in Samvat 
1968, A. d. 1912. He had one daughter, who has been 
married to the present Chief of Dhrangdhra. 

Owing to maladministration, the Taluka was taken 
under Government management in the year 1911 A. d. 
Fatehsingji was succeeded by his brother Rana Amarsingji, 
bat the Taluka was continued under management till the 



STATES — BHADARWA. 61 

25th October 1917, when Rana Araar3ingji was regularly 
installed on the Gadi by the Political A^enfc. Rana Amar* 
singji died soon after his investiture of the full powers of 
the State, and was succeeded by his son Rana Ranjitsinhji, 
the present ruler of the State on 27th February 1918. 

Rana Ranjitsinhji was born on 2nd October 1875. He 
has two Kumars. The heir- apparent K. S. Natwarsingji 
was born on 19th November 1903 and has received his 
education at the Rajkumar College, Rajkot, while the 
younger Kumar K. S. Sarupsingji was born on 27th 
December 1908 and is receiving his education at the Taluk- 
dari School, Godhra. 

The State consists of fifteen villages covering an area 
of 27 square miles. The population consists of Brahmins, 
Banias, Rajputs, Kolis, and Musalmans,, and is 9568 
souls according to the census of 1921. Over and above this the 
State has got extensive wantas in the Baroda territory. 
The revenue of the State is about Rs. 60,000. The annual tribute 
payable to Baroda Government is Rs. 14,674 inclusive of 
Sarpav of Rs. 307, 

The State has six schools inclusive of a Girls* School 
in Bhadarwa. It has its own Police. It had fall civil 
jurisdiction, while in criminal matters the powers were 
restricted to those of a First Class Magistrate with commit* 
ting powers. But in the recent classificatian the full civil 
jurisdiction has been reduced to Rs. 10,000, while the criminal 
powers have been enhanced to 3 years rigorous imprisonment) 
& fine upto Rs. 5,000. The state has protested against the 
curtailment of the civil powers, and the final orders of 
Government are awaited. 

During the time of the present Rana the following 
improvements have been made in the State : — 

1. Primary Education has been made free throughout 
tho State. 

2. Regular Survey Set tl amen t has been introduced into 

* before as a personal dUMncfoa. 



€2 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

the State, thereby abolishing the old undeserving 
taxes. 

3. The ryots have been allowed to sell and mortgage 
and to make other encumbrances on state lands 
subject to certain restrictions. 

4, Rights to trees in state occupied land have been 
conceded subject to the payment of a fixed fee. 

5, Alienation inquiry into barkhali lands in the State 
is being made by an independent officsr appointed 
by the Agency, and sarads are being issued to the 
holders concerned. The inquiry is nearing completion. 

6. The Maswadi Vero levied in Bhadarwa proper, 
which was not revised since a century, has been 
revised after proper inquiry, and in order to enabe 
people to build good houses, no vero has been applied 
as tax on the houses. 

7 '. Rules about succession have been framed and duly 
promulgated in the State, and the heirship and 
ether transfer cases, which were not duly enquired into 
previously, are now enquired into and dealt with in 
accordance with the rules. 

8. Thero were long standing arrears of land revenue, 
which have been inquired int3 and most of th^rn 
have been written off as irrecoverable, the rest being 
recovered in instalments, according to the capacity cf 
the Khatedar. 

9. The State has rendered necessary help to the 
paramount power at the time of the world-wide 
great war, both in men and money, accoiding to its 
capacity. 

The official address cf the Chief is Cl Meherban Rana." 

The State, though small, is connected by marriage ties 

with important States such as Lhrangdhra, Dhrol, Ali 

Rajpur, Sayla etc. 




THAKOR SHRI PUSHPSINHJI, 
of Sanjeli 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 



STATES— SANJELI, 63 

SANJELI. 

( FIFTH CLASS STATE). 

Area .....34 Square Miles. 

Population ....2,743 (1911) 

€808 ( 1921 ) 
Revenue 56 000 

This potty State is owned by a Chief of the elan of 
Songada Chohan Rvjputs. The founder of the house appears 
to be Satrasalji or Chatrasalji, who in some remote period 
emigrated from Meywar. As the proaenb Thakor is s»id to 
be 40th in descent from Satrasaljoe, a period of more than 
1,000 years must have elapsed since the settlement of these 
Rajputs in this part of Rewa Kantha. It is said that 
Satrasaljee reigned at Rajpur, a village near Kesarpur in 
the territory of the Rvja of Baria in 1159, and that he and 
his successors held the northern districts of Baria till th» 
time of Sardarsiugji. 

In quarrels with the Baria State, Thakor Bahadursing 
was slain in a fight. His successor Jagatsing sought the 
intervention and help of the British Government, and the 
Baria Chief agreed to allow the Sanjeli Chief to keep 12 
villages within his own control and free of Baria. These 
villages now form the Taluka of Sanjeli consisting of 52 
hamlets and are in his undisputed possession. The late 
Thakor Pratapsingji succeeded by adaption to the estate in 
1858 and died in December 1901, leaving 3 sons, 
Ranjitsing, Pushpsing and Chhatrasing, aged 34, 10 and 2 
years respectively. The elder Kumar Ranjibsing was deprived 
of the succession to the estate by order of the Government* 
of India owing to his misconduct, and the next Kumar 
Pushpsing was recognized as the Thakor, who is now ruling 
the State. He has received his education in the Talukdari 



(54 BEWA KANTHA DIBEOTORT. 

School at Wadhwan. He was invested with the powers of 
the State on 5th January 1914. 

Daring his minority the State was under Agency 
management till the State was handed over to him on 
attaining majority. The town o£ Sanjeli has been provided 
with a dispensary in 1916. 

The State enjoyed the rank and jurisdiction of 4th 
Class but in the recent gradation, it has been put in the 
6th Class, i. e, can inflict 2 years' rigorous imprisonment and 
fine upto Re. 2,000 in criminal cases and hear civil suits 
wpto Rs. 5000. The Thakor however protested against the 
revision of classification, and so the present ruler has been 
allowed to hear civil suits without any limit as a personal 
distinction, which his predecessor enjoyed, but he is not 
yet satisfied on account of the lowering of the rank of 
4th Class. 








L_. • 



THAKOR SHRI GANPAT SINHJI, 
Umeta State. 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 



STATES— UMBTHA. 65* 

UMETHi. 

( FIFTH CLASS STATE.) 

Area ..-..-. 24 Square miles. 

Population*. 5,356 (Agency villages). 

5,367 (British villages). 
Revenue... .....>Rs. 53,800. 

This estate belongs to the Baria group o£ the Panda 
Mewas. It is much detached from the other Talukas of the 
group and is situated in the extreme west on the banks 
of the Mahi river. It consists of two clusters of villages,, 
one of five in the Kaira district and the other of nine 
under the Rewa Kantha Agency. Its origin dates partly 
from the close of the 15th and partly from the dose of the 
17th century. 

According to the family accounts Jhanjharji, a Pari* 
har Rajput flying from Ohampaner at the time of its oapture 
(1484) by Mahomad Begada, took refuge in the Mahi woods,, 
and drinking water from a Bhil, lost his caste. Soon after- 
wards, killing Jayasingji of Bilpar, he received from the 
Bhetashi chief a gift of 8 villages. About 200 years later 
(1694) the headman of Umetha, unable to save his villages 
from Koli robbers, called for help to Jhanjharji's descendant 
Dalpatsing, giving him 4 villages in reward. At the division 
(1751) between the Gaekwar and the Peshwa, the Peshwa 

got five, and the Gaekwar seven villages. 
9 



,,gg BEWA KANTHA MBBCT0BY. 

In 1812 and 1820 the Umetha Thakor was classed 
among the Mahikantha tributaries, and his tribute fixed at 
Rs. 5,000 to the British and 2,552 to the Gaekwar. The 
group of seven villages in a broad bend of the Mahi, covers 
an area of 24 miles and yields a revenue of about Rs. 
50,000. Its soil is light and yields good crops of cotton, 
oil seed, sugarcane, millet and rice. 

It has a dispensary and 3 schools for boys and girls. 
The Chiefs name is Thakor Shri Ganpatsingji, who enjoys 
5th class jurisdiction in 9 villages under the Agency. 



4** 




THAKOR SHRI RANJITSINHJI OF JAMBUGHODA. 



A2731 Lakahmi Art, Bombay 8 



gfATES— JAMBTJGHODA. &* 



BARDKOT-JAMBDGpi. 

(FIFTH CLASS STATE.) 
£ rea 143 Square Miles. 

Population 8 487 ( 1911) 

9,540 ( 1921 ) 
Revenue Rs. 1,00,000. 

This petty state is owned hy a Chief of the Baria 
clan, and is chiefly inhabited by Naikdasand Kolia, formerly 
notorious robbers and bandits. The Thakor himself claims 
to be a Parmar Rajput descended from a family residing in 
Dhar in Central India. The State came under the control 
of the Political Agent, Rewa Kantha, in 1826, but the 
Gaekwar's officer was allowed to collect a small annual tribute. 
In 1833 this officer compelled the Chief to make over half 
his revenue to the Gaikwar's Government. The exaction of 
this amount caused a rising, which was only put down by a 
British force with much difficulty. The Chief then asked 
for British protection, and offered to pay half his revenue to 
Government. This offer was accepted, the revenue received 
being spent on the administration of the State, which was 
under British management till the year 1917. After the- 
establishment of order in 1837 the people remained wonder- 
fully free from crime, until in 1858, excited by the move- 
ment of rebel troops along the border, and joined by some 
of Tatia Topi's men, the Naikdas rose and plundered the 
Government Thana at Narukot. The revolt was put down 
in 1859. Nine years later a Naikda named Joria claimed 
supernatural powers and raised a serion- disturbance, which 
had to be put down by the use cf regular troops. Since 
then order has remained undisturbed. 



£8 REWA KANTHA DIBECTOBY. 

Before 1894 the State w,as treated as a 1?aluka subor- 
dinate to the Cbllectorate of the Banchmahals, but sinoe 
then it has beeu transferred to the Rewa Kantha Agency. 
After a period of 80 years of British management Govern- 
ment saw the advisability of handing over the administra- 
tion to the Chief, Gambhirsinghji Dipsinghji, on 
16th June 1917, and after his demise his son Ranjitsinghji 
succeeded him. He was installed on 2nd February 1918. During 
the period of Agency management, the young Thakore 
was given decent English education in the Rajkumar College, 
Rajkot, and was also given varied experience in the different 
branches of administration. 

He has been granted the powers of a First Class Magistrate 
with powers to inflict rigorous imprisonment upto 2 years 
and fine upto Rs. 2000 in criminal matters, and to hear 
civil suits upto the value of Rs, 5,000. 

'. * s Before year 1912-13 the3e was a system of plough assess- 
ment, but the survey has since been introduced and the 
fixed survey assessment is now being recovered instead of 
plough assessment, the maximum and minimum rates of 
assessments being Rs. 3 and Rs. l\ per acre respectively. 

In recognition of his installation after 80 years' British 
management, the late Thakor Gambhirsinghji promised 
a remission of 1/3 assessment to his poor ryots for 10 
/years from the date of his installation. The present Thakor 
has followed the footsteps of his father as regards the con- 
cession: 

For forest revenue, regular working plan system has 
been introduced by the Forest Settlement officers in the State. 

The primary education in the State has made 
wonderful progress during the last decade, with the result 
that the State which had only pne school before, has now 
got 6 in all with a pretty large number of students. 



STATES— JAMBUGH0D A. 69 

The Naikdas and Kolis, a troublesome element, have now 
been cowed down by the strong hand of the British Government, 
and they are now leading a business like and ordinary life 
of peaceful peasants. The Government on consideration of the 
administrative ability of the present Chief Ranjitsingji 
have withdrawn the British Police post of long standing, and 
the State has now its own Police. 

There are two made roads in the State (1) Jambughoda 
Bodeli Road and (2) Jambughoda Sivrajpur road with a 
length of 7 and 11 miles respectively. These two roads, 
combined with the trunk road of 18 miles, have opened this 
tract for traffic purposes, and this fact i3 largely responsible 
for the large increase in the state income, viz. from Rs. 15,000 
in 1903 to Rs. 1,00,000 in 1920. These roads were 
formerly under the management of the Government P. W. D., 
but now the management has been handed over to the 
State. The construction of this trunk road has cost the 
State an expense of Rs. 125,000. The State is connected 
with the following Railway Stations. 

Bodeli at a distance of 7 miles from the State head- 
quarter Jambughoda. 

Shivrajpur Do. 10 Do. 



Jhajwa „ 10 

Jhanta ., 8 



Jetpur 



7 






Jabugam 9 > 7 

The State has also gob a public library. The young 
Chief is to be congratulated on his obtaining the management 
of his State free from all encumbrances after having been 
in the hands of Government for nearly a century, and it 
shows the magnanimity of Government policy. 



*&&&^£*<* 




RANA SHRI KHUSHAL SINHJI, 
Minor Chief of Mandwa. 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 




THAKOR KESAR KHAN OF VAJIRIA. 



A2731 Lakshmi Art, Bombay 8 



OTHER PRETTY STATES 71 

0THEI{ PETTY STATES. 

The other petty states of some importance are Mandwa 
and Vajiria both in the 5th Class. They are in the Sankheda 
Mewas group. Bhadarwa, TJmetha and three others of the 
Pandu Mewas group were originally included in the Mahi- 
Kantha settlement and were transferred to the RewaKantha 
in 1827. There are in all 52 estates in the two Mewases ; 
some of them observe the custom of primogeniture and others 
of equal division. Some exercise petty jurisdictional powers. In 
1889-1890 the Government of India exempted from 
payment of nazarana many small subdivided estates having 
no jurisdictional powers. 

In 1882 and 1892 the Thakors of the two Mewases 
entered into arrangement by which they transferred the 
management of opium and abkari in their estates to the 
British Government on condition of payment of duty and 
pecuniary compensation respectively to them. 

The following short account is given of the states in 
the two Mewses. 




STATES— SASKHED A MEWAS. 73 

SANKHEDA MEWAS. 

Area 311\ Square Miles. 

Population • 47,554( 1911) 

53,827 (1921) 

Revenue... Es, 3,69,650 

This is a cluster of petty estates on the banks of tha 

Narbada River, owned by chiefs of Rajput extraction; some 

have retained their Rajput customs and caste, while others 

have embraced Mahomedanism under Mussalman pressure 

The latter still keep up a few of the Hindu customs and 

are called Molesalams. These estates date from the fall ot 

Pawa 2 adh (1484), when the Rajput power was broken by 

the Mussalmans, and the Rajput gentry betook themselves 

to the difficult country between the rivers Orsang and Mar- 

bada and to the banks of the Mahi. Those who went to 

the south lived in the vicinity of Sankheda, a town in the 

territory of the Gaekwar, which has given its name to the 

possessions "Mewas" o£ these petty landed F°P™^ 3 - 

Those who went to the north and west similarly formed the 

« Pandu Mewas" round the village of Pandu. 

At first there were eight families in the Sankheda 
Mewas, but in course of time they became subdivided, 
and at the present day they number 26 estates. Earljr 
in the eighteenth century when the Moghal ^hority 
*as weakened and Maratha supremacy nob established, 
the Sankheda Chiefs were able to spread their power 
over the rich plains of Gujarat, bub the increased 
power of Baroda drove them back, and laid them under an 
annual tribute, which was never paid except on compulsion. 
In 1822 the disorder was so great that tha British Govern- 
ment had to intervene. The Chiefs engaged to live peaceably 
and to pay the tribute fixed by the British Agent to the 
10 



74 



BBWA KANTHA DIRECTOKY. 



fSaekwar, while the latter agreed to acknowledge their 
independence in their own states and to respect their rights 
in the villages in Baroda territory. The petty chiefs have 
«iae3 given no trouble. They have paid their tributes regu- 
larly and accepted the Political Agent's settlement of their 
Iwandary and succession disputes. Some of them have been 
invested with small jurisdictional powers, which they exercisa 
aabject to the supervision of the Agency Courts. Mandw* 
mad Vajiria are the largest of the states, a list of which, 
arranged according to their sections, is as follows: — 



Family. 


Estate. 


Revenue. 


Caste. 






its. 




CHOHAN 


1 Mdndva* (a) 


58,400 


Hindu 


(7) 


2 Gad Boriad* (a) 


25,500 


91 




3 Shanor* (a) 


16 000 


>» 




4 Agar* (a) 


23,500 


Molesalam 




5 Sindhiapara (a) 


5,300 


U 




6 Vanmaia* (a) 


16,000 


>9 




7 Aiwa (a) 


8.800 


M 


RATHOD 








(7) 


1 Vajiria* (a) 


38,000 


Molesalam 




2 Chora ng!a (a) 


16,000 


Hindu 




3 Nangam (b) 


3,000 


Molesalam 




4 Vasan Sevada (a) 


8,000 


it 




5 Bihora ^a) 


2,000 


M 




6 Dudbpur (a) 


700 


ft 




7 Vohra (a) 


9,700 


ft 


CHAVDA. 








(2) 


1 Bhilodia (b) 


17,000 


Hindu 




2 R&mpura (b) 


12,200 


>» 


&OB1. 








(3) 


1 Jiralkamsoli (b) ... 


10,000 


Molesalam 




2 Chudesar (b) 


3,600 


»» 




3 Mlia (b) 


1,090 


ti 



STATES— SAHKHEDA MBWA8. 



75 



Family. 


Estate. 


Revenue. 


Caste. 


DAIMA. 

(4) 


1 Virpur Vasan (b).. 

2 Uch&d* (a) ... 

3 Rengan (b) 

4 Vadia Virampara (a) 


34,000 

24,000 

2500 

750 


Malesalam 
>» 
»» 
>» 


SOLANKI. 
(1) 


I Nasvddi* (a) ... 


18,000 


Hindu 


PARMAR. 
(1) 


1 Palfoni (a) „.. 


9,500 


Hinds 


PADHIAR. 
(1) 


1 Pan Talavdi (a) 
Approximate Total 


6,200 


Hindu 




3,69,650 





The whole of this territory is under the supervision 
of an Agency Thanadar and is protected by the Agency 
Police. The Head-quarters of the Thana is at Wadia, a 
village on the northern bank of th9 Narbada. Tne largest* 
town in this Mew&* is Chandod, which is joint between 
H. H. the Gaekwar and the Rana of Mandwa, a position 
which is productive of great friction and trouble. It is hell 
in great veneration by the Hindus. 



Note. — Those marked (a) have the custom o£ primogeniture^ 
while those marked (b) sub-divide. 

* These are granted petty jurisdictional powers as shown i« 
detailed Statement. 



STATES — PAKDU MEWAS. IT 



PANDU MEWAS. 



Area ..134 Square Miles. 

Population ,.20.651 (1911) 

23056 (1921) 

Revenue ~ Rs.2fiOfiOO 

As the Sankheda Mewiis Estates are situated near 
the banks of the Narbada, so the Panda Mew£s estates 
border on the Mahi River. They are also 28 in number and 
cover a frontage of 58 miles along the river's banks. The 
Pandu Mehwas estates form five groups, the chiefs of 
which are (1) Rajputs, (2) Barias of mixed Kali and Rajpub 
descent, (3) Kolis, (4) Patidars and (5) Mahomedans. The 
whole stretch of country was originally in ths hands of the 
Kolis, but the Rajputs forced their way in f when drivea 
from Champaaer. For three centuries they took advantage 
of the weakness of successive rulers to harry the rich sur- 
rounding plains. The two largest estates, Bhadarwa and 
Umetha, with a few others, were placed under the protection 
of a British officer by the Gaekwar's agreements of 18121 
and 1820, and the remainder were placed under the control 
of the Political Agent by the convention of 1825. The 
assessment of tribute on them payable to Baroda was unfor- 
tunately fixed at a high figure, and this circumstance, 
coupled with family subdivisions and the want of cultivating 
powar, have reduced most of the chiefs and their estates 
to a miserable point of poverty. The following is a list of 



78 



BEWA KAHTHA DIBECTOBY. 



the Fandu Mewas estates arranged according to the castas 
of their chiefs :— 




RAJPUTS. 

™< 10) 
Waghela 

Solanki 



Parmar and 

ratha 
Batbod 



Waghela 

BARIAS. 

Padhiar 
Parmar 

>» 

>> 

» 

Solanki 

KOLIS. 
(V 



Ma- 



1. *Bhadarwa (a) 

2. *Chbaliar (a) 

3. Vakhtapur (b) 

4. Rajpnr ... (a) 

5. Dhari (b) 

6. Riika (b) 

7. Itwad ^(b) 

8. Moti Varnoli (*») 

9. Nani Varnoli (a) 
10. Poicha (b) 



1. *Umetha...... (a) 

2. *Sihora., 00 

3 Kanoda... ... ... [b) 

4. Varnolmal (j>) 

5. Nahara ( b ) 

8. Jumkha («) 

7. Amr&pur ( b ) 



1. Anghad (b) 

2. Mevli (b) 

3. Gotardi (b) 

4. Kasla Paginu Mu- 
vadu «... (b) 

5. Moka Paginu 
Muva,du....~... (b) 

6. Gothda... ...... (b) 

7. Jesar ~.... ^b) 



55.000 
12,000 

1,400 
600 

4,350 

4 000 

1,400 

750 

500 

1,600 



53 ; 800 

30 700 

2,300 

1230 

75 

450 

500 



8,000 

6,500 

700 

300 

400 

4,500 

450 



♦These are granted jurisdictional powers as shown in detailed 
Statement. 



STATES — PANDO MEWAB. 



19 



Caste. 


State 


Revenue. 




PATIDARS, 

(1) 

MAHOMEDANS. 
(1) 


1. Dodka (b) 

1. Pandu...^... (b) 
Approximate Total. 


3,600 
4,000 






1,99 105 





Note: — Those marked (a) have the custom o£ primogeniture, 
while those marked (b) sub-divide. 

The whole o£ this territory is, like the Sankheda Mewaa, 
under the supervision of an Agency Thanadar and is protected 
by the Agency Police, with the exception of the States of 
Bhadarwa and Umetha, which are not under the Taanadar 
and have their own separate palice and jurisdiction. The 
Thakor of Bhadarwa enjoys the rank of a 4th Class Chief 
and exerc : s3s the powers of inflicting 3 years' rigorous imprison- 
ment and fine upto Rs. 5 000 in criminal cases and hearing 
civil suits upto the value of Rs, 10,000, while Umetha 13 
in the 5th Class with the power to inflict rigorous impri- 
sonment for 2 years and fine upto Rs. 2,000, and to hear 
civil suits upto Rs. 5.000. The head-quarters of Panda 
[ Thana is at Pandu, a village on the banks of the Kavach 
river, an afflaent of the Mahi. 




LAND ADMINISTRATION. 81^ 

LAND ADMINISTRATION. 

The land as a rule belongs to the Chiefs, except where 
it is alienated. There are several clas^ of alienated lands, 
(1) Giras or Jiwak i. e. granted as appanange to cadets o£ 
ruling families. (2) Inam i. e. granted for long or faithful 
service. (3) Patawat, granted on condition of renderings 
military or other service. (4) Davasthaa, for m\intenanoe of 
temples. (5) Dharmada, charitable gifts, (6) Chakariat, 
granted for service to the community or the State. 

Lands of the first three classes are generally subject to - 
payment of small annual amounts under the name of Jjma, 
Salami, Tank, or Foj Veto. 

2. It is a recognised and universal custom to provide 
for the maintenance of younger members of Chiefs' families 
by setting apart villages or lands sufficient to keep up their 
position. This assignment is caltad their Kapal Giras. 
Inam and Patawat tenures have a different origin. 

8. When the Rajputs or other strangers overran the- 
country, their leaders keeping the lion's share for themselves, 
distributed part of the land among their followers either 
without any oondition attached or on promise of help io 
times of wars, or in the administration of the state in time 
of peace. Those of tha military classes serve with a certain 
number of horsemen as guards of honour, whenever the Chiefs 
go out of their territories on pilgrimages or other peaceful 
errands. They are also bound to attend the Chiefs on festive 
or ceremonial occasions and thus to add to the grandeur of 
the 'Rajas' procession on the Dasera or other holidays. A. 
Chief may resume a Patawat holding, at his pleasure, on the 
ground of the non-performance of service or other conditions, 
or on account of failure of heirs. Jivak 1 grants are heredi- 
tary holdings as of right, and are divisible among descendants. 
They are resumed on failure of heirs, but sometimes the holder 
is allowed on payment of Nazirana to'acbpt- a successor, 

11' \ . • ::•'■.■< 



: ^Bt REWA KANTHA DIBHOTORY. 

4. Alienated lands are not supposed to be sold to 
^ther persons, as such disposal defeats the object of the grant, 
bat the principle dries not seem to have been rigidly observed. 
Various holdings or portions of then have passed into 
the hands of money lenders and others within the last 
century, as no hard and fast rules were ever promulgated 
«a the subject. The broad rule which Government have 
laid down is that lands liable for the payment of tribute 
dbouid not be soli or otherwise disposed of. Recently ia 
mwne states enquiries into tae titles of alienate! lauds have 
baea made and possession is confirmed or disturbed, or sub- 
jected to the payment of Salami according to the length of 
possession cr strength of proof of tiUe under certain prescribed 
K'lles. The Agency has also similar rules for the areas uadar 
its supervision. 

5. In the larger states the revenue is collected by 
Tfaandars or Mahaikaris, who are pUcsi in charge of sub- 
divisions called Tatukas, Pragan%s, or Mihals. Tae smaller 
chiefs personally supervise the collection agisted by petty 
officials or the village Barms. Holders of petty pitches of 
lands, whose income is barely enough to meet their wants, 
fcoep a home farm (Grharkhed) which is tilled by themselves 
«r their servants. 

6. There are various systems of revenue collection, i.e.— 

(a) Bighoti.— Cash assessment per acre or Bigha fixed 
according to survey measurement ani classification 
of soil. 

-ifi) Khatabandi.— The holdings are roughly measured into 
Bighas or Kumbhas and the assessment is fixed at 
certain cash rates on the bigha or Kumbha accord- 
ing to the quality of land or produce. This is varU 
able at discretion, 

<4c) Halbandi or plough tax. — This is levied from the 
most backward oUsm, the Bhils, Naikias, and 
Kolis, who generally live among hills or forest 



LAND 4DMINI8T1U.T10N. 8fc* 

tracts. A oertaia cash amount is levied on pairs of? 
bullocks possessed by them irrespective of the actual . 
extent of land cultivated. 

(d) In some of the states a certain number of villages * 
are held by the headmen on what is called Udhad„ 
Ijara or Ankadia tenure. The State receives from - 
them a lump sum only, for the whole village, white 
the individual collection from the cultivators is made 
by the headmen. The length and terms of tenure 
vary according to the circum3tancas of each case. 
Some are hereditary, while others are for specified 
pariod3 liable to revision or resumption. 

(e) Bhagbatai, i.e. crop share system. Either a share 
of the grain or its equivalent in coin is levied by 
the Chief under this system. 

These are the five principal systems of revenue collec- 
tions. In the first four, cash recoveries are made, while ia 
the fifth the State receives a share of the crops. When the 
crops are ready to cub, the State officials or the Thakore 
themselves examine each field and with the help of a Paaeh. 
or experts make and record an estimate of the crop, whci* 
is locally called the KUtar. In some cases the estimate is 
made after the crop i3 reapad and harvested. In K*thiawar 
the state share is generally separated when the grain is 
ready, and is af:erwards sold by the State in opan markau ; 
but here in the Rewa Kantha, the State recaivas only the 
equivalent in cash according bo the ruling prica of graio* „ 
The State share varies according to the season, the kind of 
grain and the honesty of assessors. It generally amounts fc> 
| or J, but in addition to the share certain cesses under 
various names as Havaldari, Sakhdi, Kharaj it, &c, are some 
timas levied, and the cultivators undar this system are lefe 
pretty much to the tender mercies of th) Stata officiils* 
Where there are clear shares, without any casses, the inco - 
venienees are absent. 

7, Sono of the rildesb and most indolent Bhife and 



"'-* 



KKWA K1KTHA DIRECTORY. 



Kolis living in the forests and near the hills resort to the 
simpler mode of producing grain. Instead of taking the 
trouble of tilling the land by means of the plough, they 
simply clear and prepare the ground by burning process, of 
which there are two species, Dajhia and Jhuoiba > or Walra 
and Bantia. For the former the cultiVitor salecfcs a patch 
of ground, cats as much wood as is necegsary for the pur- 
pose in the neighbourhood, brings it to the selected patch 
of grouni and burns it there. Afterwards he turns up the 
ashes with an axe and sows his seed. For a Jaumba or 
Bantia, a bit of a hill slope is selected and all tha trees 
standing on it are burnt down, after which the ashes are 
turned up and the seed sown. In both oases tha state 
revenue is levied according to the area sown. Both systems 
aw wasteful and destructive of the forest proparoy of the 
state and are calculated to encourage indoieaca. They are, 
therefore, discouraged a3 much as possible. 

8. An acre is equal to If bighas. The extent oE a 
Kumbha varies in different localities. la some places it is 
equal to 2 Bighas and in others to 5 Bighas. According 
to present survey measurements the exact relative dimensions 
are as follows : — 

1 Acre =43,560 sq. ft. 
=17,810 cubits. 

1 Kumbha=43.264 sq. ft. 
16,900 cubits. 

1 Bigha= 25,600 sq. ft. 
=10,000 cubits. 

9. Old Kumbhas or Najaria Kumbhas, which are preva- 
lent in a few petty States, are nearly three times the present 
survey Kumbha. 

10. The incidence of Halbandi collection is as follows:- 
Rajpipla Rs. 4 rising to Rs. 18 per plough. 
Balasinor „ 5 „ „ 5| fl 

Sunth „ 4 „ „ 20 „ 

Sanjeli M 4 „ „ c 20 



LAND ADMINISTRATION. &$ 

For Dajhia and Jhumta cultivation the assessment 
varies from Rs. 2 to 3 par acre, 

11. Besides the above systems, there i§ a special - 
method of deriving revenue from alluvial lauds. Such lauds 
are not given on the ordinary permanent occupancy tenure, 
but are leased out annually or for a term of years according 
to the character of the land. 

12 In the Bhaorbatai or crop-share system, the share 
of the State is either J or J of the crop supplemented by 
various cesses. 

13. Such cesses are levied under other tenures also. 
There are no hard or fast ruie3 on the subject and their 
imposition and incidence vary in different! Soa&es. They are 
enumerated below :— ' 

1. Hari Glii. 

2. Desai CJiirdan. 

3. Dssa?/ Vero. 

4. Garasia Vero. 

5. Chirdan Dasgamna. 

6. Lagan Mandvo (marriage tax) % 

7. Natra Vero (Remarriage tax). 

8. Doli Mahuda. 

9. Jhumpdi Vero. 

10. Janana Vero. 

11. Diwali Vero. 

12. Rajput Vero or Jama. 

13. Chirda Vero. 

14. Khichdi Vero. 

15. Sukhdi Vero. 

16. Kunvar Sukhdi. 

17. Chandla Vero. 

18. Chauth. 

19. Khajru. 

20. Ped. 

21. Raeo. 

14. In addition to these, there are other taxes on 
artizans or traders' shop? under various names, too numerous 
to mention. 



W AEW A KANTHA MBBCTOBt. 

LOCAL FUNDS. 
In the Eewa Kantha Agency tbere are three Local 
Funds viz:— 

1. The Mewas Administration Fund. 
2 # The Education Pension Fund. 
3. Ihe Agency General Fund. 

1. MEWAS ADMINISTRATION FUND. 

It is irade up of contributions at the rate of 
6 \ percent cf revenue from the Talukdars of the Mewas 
towards the cost of Thana and Hazur Establishments 
supervising them, interest on Government Promissory Notes, 
Law and Justice, cattle pound receipts, Education Fees, 
Opium and Abkari revenues, Survey recoveries and other 
miscellaneous items. 

The previous rate of 4| percent has been raised to 6i 
percent to improve the condition of the Fund, allowing the 
Talukdars to recoup themselves by an additional assessment 
cf half an anna in the rupee from their tenants as per 
Government Resolution No. 4995 dated 21st August 1913, 
Political Department. 

The income is applied to the maintenance of Thaadar3 
and their establishments and o£ establishment entertained 
in the offices of the District Deputy Political Agent 
and the Political Agent, Rewa Kantha, maintenance of jails, 
schools, dispensaries and vaccinators, famine relief, public 
works, survey charges and other miscellaneous expenses 
connected with the administration of the Mewas District. 



2. THE EDUCATION PENSION FUND. 

The Education Pension Fund consists of contributions 
from the States for the pensions of school masters at one 
; anna per rupee of the sanctioned pay of the post. 



BKWA KAKTHA DIRECTORT. fc? 

3. THE AGENCY GENERAL FUND. 

The Agency General Fund is composed of the Education 
Fund and the Talukdari School Fund. 

(a) The former is made up of contributions from the 
States in proportion to the amount of their gross income 
to defray the salaries of the Daputy Educational Inspector 
and his establishment. 

(b) The Vajiria Talukdari School Fund is converted 
into the Talukdari School Fund, the school having been 
shifted from Vajiria to Godhra. The Fund consists of 
contributions by Government and the Educational Pension 
Fund as grants, kumar's school fees, interest on Government* 
Securities and other miscellaneous receipts including fines. 

The following table gives a rough outline of the incoina 
and expenditure of the above Funds , 



88 ^BW* KAHTHH BH»0TG$Y. 

MewaS Administration Fund. 

Beoiipts. Expenditure. 

Re. Bs. 

Contributions ... 18 250 General Administration 11,400 

Interest 8,450 Excise 600 

Law and Justice •.. 3,200 Law and Justice ... 450 

Cattle Pounds ... 1,500 Jails 1,000 

Education 500 Cattle Pounds . 400 

Miscellaneous ... 3,100 Education 8,000 

Extraordinary and debt 500 Medical ( Dispensaries 3,500 
Survey recoveries ... 650 and Vacoinat6rs 

Opium 15,900 Famine Relief 

Abkari 80 Public Works ... .... 5,900 

Refunds 400 

Extraordinary and Debt 

including investments 14,900 
Survey Charges ... 760 

Opium expenses ... 40 

Besides the oasb balance the Fund holds Government 
Promissory Notes worth Rs. 2,95,500. 

Education Pension Fund. 

Receipts... ... ... 9,600 Charges 11,900 

The Fund holds Government Promissory Notes of the 
▼aloe of Rs, 1,67,200. 

Agency General Fund. 

Receipts. Charges. 

Education Fond 2,400 2.200 

Talukdari School Fnnd... 6,000 , 5000 

The Funds hold Government Promissory Notes worth 
Rs. 19,400 and Rs. 43,900 respectively. 



JtEWA KAHTH A OTRECIOM. 099 

EDUCATION. 

According to £he Hindu scriptures, it was the primary 
duty of the Brahman class to learn and to teaeh-a profession 
not followed by any other classes. 

Accordingly before the introduction of state education most 
villages of some importance had their private indigenous schools 
taught by Brahmans, and in villages unprovided with su^h 
schools stray Brahmins sometimes opened temporary classes 
during the rainy season. For tW3 or three of the rainy 
months and at harvest times the Brahman teacher was 
generally paid in grain and sometimes in money. His total 
receipts varied from Rs. 50 to 75 per annum. Private 
schools in towns were mostly established by the forefathers 
of the present Brahman teachers. On entering the school 
a boy offered 8 annas to the goddess of learning, Saraswati. 
Everyday that he attended, he brought the teacher a handful 
of grain, and on holidays 1 pice in addition. When he was 
going to be married, his teacher got Re. 1. Boys seldom 
staytd at these schools after 12 years of age. Girls, a3 a 
rule, did not attend any school. Between 6 and 8 years, 
boys were taught native numerial tables " Anks. M After- 
wards they learnt to write by tracmg letters on sanded boards 
and by writing characters with wet chalk on black boa dr 
They seldom learnt writing well, but mental aritmetic was 
taught to perfection, and this part of their teaching has 
been since adopted in state schools. In the indigenous 
schools, boys went to their teachers dwelling, and as the 
bouse was often small, the pupils sat in a group at the s de 
of the street in front of the door in the morning and 
evenings, working sums or shouting arithmetical tables, The 
position of the masters, and the religious elements in some 
parts of their instruction greatly helped them in their work. 
Only the Brahmins and the trading class attached any 
importance to education, because it helped them in their daily 

vocations. The other classes of the population were gens, ally 
indifferent. 

12 



90 % pEWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

2 # State education on the modern principles was 
introduced, when the British supremacy was firmly established 
in Rewa Kantha. In 1864-65 there were 13 schools, H 
for bojs and two for girls, with a total number of 1023 
pupils. In 1878-79, i. e. 13 years later, the number of schools 
had risen tc 67 and the number of pupils to 3 448, or aa 
average of one school for every 52 vilUge3. Excluding 
superintendence charge, the total expenditure on account of 
j these state schools was R3. 17,230. These schools were 
supervised by the Deputy E lucational Ia3p9C:or, Panel* 
Mahals, in addition to his charge, under the orders of the 
Elucationai Inspector N. D. and the Director of Public 
Instruction, Bombay Presidency. 

3- Out of the 67 schools, in sixty six Gujarati ofciy 
was taught, and in one Hiudustani. Of the Gujarati sohoo ! s, 
three were for girls in the towns of Nandod, Lunavada and 
Balasinor, which contain a trading and well-to-do class of 
inhabiants. 

Of the 3,448 pupils in the Raw* Kantha school 949 
or 27*5 p. c. ware Brahmans, 184 or 53 p. c. were Kshabris, 
3 or # 08 p. c. were Kayasths and Parbhus, 740 or 21 4 
p. c. were traders, i. e. Vania3, Bhatias, and Modhias, 55 or 
1-5 p. c. were Jains or Shrawaks, 694 or 20 I p. c. were 
cultivators, i. e. Kunbis and Kolis. 

230 or 6*6 craftsmen, i. e. goldsmiths i carpenters 
and blacksmiths. 

152 — 4*4 Personal servants i. e. Dhobis, Bhistis 
and Mcohis. 

124— 26 Bards and genialogists. 
208-603 Musalmans. 

5 — Parsia. : 

5 — Hill tribesmen. 

3— Portuguese. 

There were no Dhedh or Bhangi pupils. 



RBWA KANTH ^ DIRECTORY, 91 

4, Twenty-fife years later, i. e. in 1903-04, the number 
of schools had risen to 146 of which half the number was 
ia the first class State of Rajpipla, which also could boast 
of a High School Fifteen years later, i. e. in 1918, there 
were 223 schools of all sorts attended by 13 940 pupils.. The 
amount spent on education was about Rs. 1.07,200, the 
cost being borne by the States. In 1920 -2 1, the number of 
schools was 238 & the cost of education was Rs. 1,59,441. No 
school fees are charged in the States of Chhota Udepur, Baria, 
Sunth-Rampur, Balasinor, Bhadaiwa, Jambughodaand Sanjeli. 
It is almost compulsory in Jatnbughoda. Elementary phy- 
sisal education is imparted in almost all the schools, but there 
is nothing like manual training in any of the schools. Garden- 
ing is however done to some extent in some of the big schools. 

Special attention is paid to moral instruction. Religious 
instruction as such is not imparted in any school, bub Kuraa 
is taught in some of thi private Madress<*s and something 
of Sanskrit is taught in the Path3halas of LuuavaJa, Chanod 
and Nandod. 

The administration and control of the schools in the 
Rajpipla and Baria States have been handed over to the 
States concerned, while all the rest are under the super visim 
of the Deputy Educational Inspector, Panch-mahals. Inspec- 
tion however of the schools in B<*ria rests with the Educa- 
tional Department. The States as a rule bear the exp mes 
of their respective schools. The State authorities ara always 
consulted before submitting the budget proposals, whio^ are 
accepted by the various states. These proposals are then 
submitted by the Deputy through the Educational Inspector 
N. D. to the Political Agent, who is the final sanctioning 
authority as regards schools under the control cf the 
Department. 

There were 17 private sohooh in the Agency in 1918 
with 75iJ pupils. Every village has got a school committee 
consisting of 5 or 6 members, who are expected to render 
immediate and necessary help to the school master. 



9J^ BEWA KANTHA MOTCTORY 1 / 

The e is only one High School at Nandod, which 13 
attended by 450 pupils. The anglo- Vernacular schools at 
Lun&vada and Baria teach the High School standards in 
addition to the Middle School Standards. Altogether there 
are six Anglo- Vernacular Bchools. 



TALUKDARI SCHOOL. 

The Talukdari School at Godhra is atao an Aagld* 
Vernacular school for the special purpose of teaching the 
sons of petty Talukdars of the Agency, who cannot affjri 
to go to the Rajkumar College at Rvjlot, or the T*lukcUrL 
Schools at Wadhwan or Sadra. There are now 16 student 1 
in this school. It was at first located at Vajiria in the 
Sankheda Me was, but was brought to Qjdhra in 1908, 
where a new building was constructed by contributions ffomt 
the Chiefs and Talukdars of the Rewa K*ntha Agency. Id 
was opened by the then Governor Lard Sydenham, in a 
great gathering o£ Chiefs and Talukdar3, Since th3n thi 
school passed through good and bad times until 1920, 
when Mr. Abbot tried to put it on a batter financial b%$h. 
He collected funds for the award of scholarships to Kumars 
from States, whose financial condition did nob permit them 
to receive better education. Tue students in this soh}?! 
study upto anglo vernacular standard IV, when they are 
sent to the Telang High School at G\)dhra. 

The school fees of the Kumars are regulated aecsrdiuT 
to the revenue of the State. The minimum is R*. SO, 
and the maximum is Rs. 200. The coso of bearding of & 
Kumar par term comes to about R3. 175, including a 
servant. Without a servant it comes to about Rs. 150. 

Donations to the school Fund are Rs, 1201, and they 
will continue for a period of ten years from 1920 to 193». 
The interest on accumulated funds is abodtRs. 1890 ft year; 4 



BEWA KAKTHA 1>II«CT<*R*. $£' 

Government give an annual grant of R3. 2,000. The total 
expenditure of the school cornea to about Rs. T,000 approxi- 
mately, so that each Kumar's education c:>3t* ft*. 500 p^r 
annum. 



PRIMARY EDUCATION 



As regards primary education, it may be said fchati 
much remains yet to be done. The D3puty Elucatioail 

Inspector records in his latest Annual Reporb the following 
observations :-— 

" 1. There are 255 schools with 16 610 pupils against 
249 and 15,519 respectively last year. The increase is due 
to the increase in schools in the two Mewases. 

"2. The average cost per pupil comes to Rs. 45 ia 
secondary and Rs. 9 in primary schools. This i3 quite very 
low as compared with Rs. 57 and Rs. 15 in the Paneh. 
Mahals, since the salaries of teachers have not increased ta 
a desirable extent in many St$te3, especially Lunawada, 
Balasinor and ethers. 

cC 3. With the exception of a few big schools, Agency 
schools as a rale being located in small villages, inhabited 
by most backward classes, are found lacking in appliances 
for physical exercises. Boys are simply drilled for want of 
them. A few schools have gardens, wherever there are 
water facilities. 

" 4. Every possible opportunity has been turned to 
impart moral instruction during school lessons. The Koran 
is taught in private Madressas, Sanskrit is well taughfc ia 
Pathshalas at Lunawada, Nandod and Chandod. 

" 5. There are two hostels one at Nandod and the 
other at Godhra for sons of Talukdars. At Nandod there 
are 32 and in the Talukdari school there are 18 restdeiife 
pupils. 



94 IKWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

fl 6. Conferences of teachers were encouraged in big^ 
Tillages with a view to further education and try to get 
over the difficulties of teachers on the spot. 

" 7. As a matter of fact salaries in all state schools^ 
with a happy exception o£ Chhota Udepur and two 
Mewases, are comparatively very low, especially in Lunawada, 
and so it is very hard to secure good teachers for their 
schools. Even the trained bands grumble very much on 
account of their low salaries and consequent hard lot, aa 
compared with the r brethren in British Districts. I am 
glad to say thit the Chhota Udepur State takes a great 
deal of interest in educational matters. It is the only state 
where there is a trained headmaster with the highest salary 
obtainable by a trained hand. All the States should now 
try their best to improve the salaries of the poorly paid 
innocent and humble school masters, who have to pass their 
life at many important social and other sacrifices. There are 
certain corner and bad climate villages, where salaries are 
necessarily to be raised to induce masters to continue in 
their posts against all odd?. 



Primary education for girls. 

"8. There are 19 girls 1 schools with 1710 pupils against 
1536 last year. In addition to these 841 girls attend boys* 
school?. There is thus an increase in this important part of 
primary education. There are 61 women teachers, of whom. 
18 are trained and the rest 43 are unqualified. 

" 9. The same pitiable tale has to be told about the sad 
lot of female teachers, as their salaries are comparatively 
Tery low. The big girls' school at Lunawada cannot secure 
the services of a good trained hand for want of adequate 
afclary for the Head Mistress. 



BEWi. KA&THA DIBBCfORT. 0* 

Training of teacher*, 

"10. The number of trained teachers is less than one third. 
States should provide adequate scholarships and . offer 
reasonably good salaries to meet) this waat, otherwise the 
want is bound to CDntinue. The scholarships offered by 
IiUnawada State were small, and the conditional salaries ** 
were very small, and so the scholarships were nob accepted 
-by scholars. It would be just in keeping with the times, 
if they provide good scholarships with prospects for good 
salaries to have trained hands. There is a great deal of 
discontent among trained hands, since their brethren in Local 
Board schools get much higher salaries with much brighter 
hopes for the future; All the trained and untrained hands 
have been daily requesting me to take them up in L. B. 
schools, as their salaries are quite very low and meagre/* 



BACKWARD AND DEPRESSED CLASSES, 

There are no special schools for the aboriginals, baft 
2192 of this class attend the ordinary schools. 12 teachers 
'of this class are servin ; in different schools. One tow caste 
class is attached to the Lunavada Main school, which has 
got 23 pupils. There is a Dhedh. evening class at Nandod, 
which has got 26 pupils. In addition to these 150 papik 
attend the ordinary schools. 



COST OF EDUCATION. 

The following statement shows the cost of education 
and percentage to population and revenue in the different 
atates of the Agency. 



» 



BKWA KAKTH^ DIRECTORY. 



State. 


Revenue. 


a 
.2 

Is 

s 

o 


1 

o 

CO 

o 

CD 

a 


Expenditure on 
eduoation. 

i- — — — ^— — — — — — — ~~ — 


Incidence of school 
to population. 


fercentage ot ex- 
penditure on eduoa* 
tion to revenue. 




Kajpipla. 122,60,000 


1,68,454 


89 


73,393 


1,591 


3-1/5 




Chhota Udepur. 


10,00,000 


1,25,746 


31 


13,926 


4,056 


1 




Baria w 


9,50,000 


1,37,289 


16 


12 777 


10,560 


H 




Lunavada 


5,55,500 


83,242 


14 


12,131 


5,946 


2-1/5 




Balasinor ... 


2,68,800 


44,073 


15 


9,722 


2,938 


H 




Smith Rampur 


2,78,000 


70,964 


13 


8 730 


5,458 


3 




Kadana 


77,000 


15,377 


3 


1,575 


5,125 


2 




Bhadarwa 


60,000 


9,568 


6 


2;400 


1,594 


4 




Sanjeli ... 


56,000 


6808 


2 


799 


3,404 


■1* 




XJmetha 


53,800 


5356 


3 


1,533 


1,452 


'* f 


Jambughoda ... 


1,00.000 


9,540 


5 


4,800 


1,908 


44/5 




Sankheda Mewas 


3,75,000 


53.827 


25 


11,355 


2,070 


> 3 




Pandu Mewas... 
(Excluding Bbadai 
wa and XJmetha). 


92.50C 


23,056 


» 16 
; 238 


6,300 
159441 


» 1,647 


' 7 


| 


Total.., 


61,26,60( 


), 7,53 30( 


3271 


i 2-4 





It shows that while some progress has been made 
in the last 20 years, there is still much room for further 
improvement, and that the States ought to pay a larger 
share cf attention and their finarces to the fundamental 
question of educating the masses and paying adequate 
salaries to the masters than they have done hither Co, if they 
•ire to keep their pace with the contiguous British Districts. 



98 



BBWA KANTHA. DIRECTORY. 



AGENCY COURTS 



Name of 
Court. 



1. Court of 

Political 
Agent. 



Court of 
Assistant 
Political 
Agent. 



3. Court of 
Deputy 
x\;litical 
Agent. 

4. Thandar 
Sankbeda 
Mewas. 

5. Thandar 

Pandi* 
Mewas. 

6. Head Kar- 

kun Dodka 
Mewas. 



Powers. 



Political. 



Civil. 



Control and general 
supervision over all 
States and hearing 
appeals against 
orders passed by 
subordinate, offices 
and Courts. 

General control and 
supervision over petty 
Talukas specially put 
under him. 



Do. Do. over the 
petty states of the 
Mewas, Bhadarwa 
and Uuietha. 



(a) Hearing appeals 
against the deci- 
sions of lower 
courts. 

'b) Re visional power*. 



(a) 
(b) 



Original suits to 
any extent. 
Hearing appeals 
against the deci- 
sions of Than iars 
under him. 



Do. 



Do. 



Heating suits up to 
the value of Rs. 3000. 

Hea ing suits up to 
the value of Rs. 1009 



BBWA KAHTHA DIRBCTOBY. 



99 



AND THEIR POWERS. 







Couit of a] 


Dpeal. 


Criminal. 


Political. 


C'viL 


Criminal. 


Sessions Judge 
and Districti 
Magistrate. 


Government. 


Government. 


(a) Court of Com- 
missioner N . D. 
ia all but murder 
cases. 

(b) Government 

in murder case?. 


First Class 
Magistrate. 


Political 
As;ent. 


Political 
Agent. 


Political Agent. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do, 


Do. 


Second Class 
Magistrate. 


> 






Do. 


Deputy 
| Political 
^ Agent. 

1 


Deputy- 
Political 
Agent. 


Do. 


3rd Class 
Magistrate. 


i 

i 

i 

> 


Do. 


Do. 



100 BEWA KANTHA DIBECTOBY. 

CLASSES AND POWERS OF STATE*. 

1st Class.— Full ; only in criminal matters the permission 
of the Politic il Agent is required to try any 
British subject for capital oflfeaces. 

Civil-To any extent. 

2nd Class. — Fall, with the following reservation, i. e. to 
criminal matters, the permission ok the Political 
A^ent is required to try British or other 
foreign subject for capital offences. 

Civil-To any extent. 

3rd Class. — In criminal matters seven years* rigorous 
imprisonment and fine to the extent of Rs. 
10,000. 

Civil-to the extent of Rs. 20,000. 

4lh Class. — Criminal— Three years' rigorous imprisonment 
and fine to the extent of Rs. 5 000. 

Civil.— to the extent of R?. 10 000. 

5th Ciass. — Criminal. Two years' rigorous imprisonment 
and fine to the extent cf Rs. 2,000. 

Civil— to the extent o£ Rf. 5,000. 

6th Class. — Criminal. Three months rigorous itnprboauote&tb 
and fine to the extent of Rs. 200. 

Civil upto Rs. 500. 

1th Class. — Criminal — 15 days rigorous imprisonment and 
fine to the extent of Rs. 25. 

Civil-none. 







DETAILED PARTICULARS 

of 
States and Talukas. 



IMP 



302 



KEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY, 



DEIAILFD PAR1ICULARS OF 



No. 



Name of State. 



Name of Chief. 



Date of 

birth of the 

Chief. 



Caste or Tribe 



Rajpipla 



Chhota Ude- 

pur 

Bana 



6 

7 
8 
9 

10 

11 



Lunavada 



Balasinor ...^ 



His I^igbneps 
Mftharana Shri 
Vijajsitihji .... 

Maharawnl Shri 
Fat^fesin//]i 

Cipft^« H. H. 
Maharawaj Shri 
Runjitsi b]i ... 

Maharana Shri Sir 
Wakhatsinhji, 
K. C. I. E. 

Babi Shri Jamiat 
khai ji • , 



30-1-90 



South 

Kadana 

Bhadarwa , 



Sanjeli . 
Umetha. 

Narukot. 



12 



13 



Mandwa 



Vajiria. 



Maharana Shii 
Jorawaisinhji ... 

Rana Shri 
Cbhatrasalji 

Thakor R&njitsinhji 

Thakor Pushp* 
sinhji 

Thakor Ganpat- 
sinhji 



ThakorPanjitsinhji 

SANKBEDA 

MEW AH. 

(26) 

Rana Khusalsing 
&ajansing (minoi) 
(Agency management) 
'lhakorKesarkbanji 
Kalubava. 



23-10 
10 7- 

28-8 

10-11- 

24-3- 
28-1- 
2-10- 
11-12- 
9-11- 



-84 
-86 

61 

•94 

•81 
■7* 
■75 
■92 
91 



4-1- 92 



21-9 
17-10 



-12 



Rajput Gohel 



Rpjput 

Cbxhan. 
Do. Do. 



Rajprt 
Solauki. 

Mahomed an 
Babi. 

Rajput Powar 

Do. Do. 

Rajput 

Wsghela. 
Raj put 

Chohan. 
Baria 

Padbiar. 

Do. 



Rajput 
Chohan. 



-76 Molesalam 
Rathod. 



DETAILED PARTICULARS OF CTATBS. 



1«3 



STATES in the Rewa Kantha Agency. 



Class or" 
Jurisdic- 
tion or 
powers. 



ii 
ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 
in 

IV 

v 

V 



V 



Area o£ 

State in 

square 

miles 



Estimated 
revenue. 



Population 



1 5 17 J 22,60,000 



1 63.454 



Tribute to 

H. H. the 

Graekwar 

or Govt. 



Whether tb© 
custom or primo- 
geniture prevails 
or partition. 



50,001 



890 
813 

388 

189 

394 
130 

27 
34 

24 

143 



0,00,000 1,25 746 7.805 
9.50,000 1,87-289 . 



5.50,000 
2 68,000 



Priuaogenifcurai 



Do. 
Do. 



83,242 G. 5.001 
B. 9,230 

44,073, G. 3 078 
B. 9,766 



2 78.000 


70,964 


B. 5,385 


1 

77 000 

1 


15,377 





1 
60.000, 


9,568 


14 674 


56,000 


6 808 





1 
53,800, 


f 5,356 
\ 5,567 


3,846 



16* 
10 



1,00,000 9.540 



58,400 
38,000 



5 362 



32 



6.395 



170813-6 
8851-8-8 



Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Da. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 



Do. 
Dou 



104 



RBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



K°- 



Name of State. 



Name of Chief. 



Date of 

biithofthe Caste or Tribe. 

Chief. 



14 



Gad Boriad ... 



15 



16 



Sbanor 



Naswadi 



17 

18 



Uchad 
Agar 



19 



Vanmala 



Thakor 
Chandrasins; ... 



R*na Vakhatsine 1835 I 1>. 



1864 



Rajput 
Chohan 



Khuealsing 



Thakor Mansing 



6-10-81 



Thakor 

Mahmadmia ... 

Thakor Gartibhir* 
khan Sardarkban 



15-10-95 



1866 



R»jput 
Solan ki 



Moleaalaw 
Daitua 

Molesalaui- 
Ctuhan 



Thakor 
Bahadurkbaojt 



1860 



Do. 



DBTAILED PARTICULARS OF STATES. 



105 



Class o£ 
Jurisdic- 
tion or 
powers. 



Area o£ 

State in 

square 

miles 



Estirnatod 
revenue. 



Population 



Tribute to 

H. H. the 

Graekwar 

or Govt. 



Whether the 
custom of prirafcr 
geniture prevajjg 

or partition* 



VI 

Thakor Chandra 
sing is grantQd 
2nd Class Ma- 
gisterial powers 
as a personal 
distinction. 

VI 



VI 

Criminal 

Thakor Man- 
sinhji is granted 
2nd Class Magis- 
terial powers as 

a personal dis- 
tinction. 

VI 



VI 

Civil 

Thakor Gambhir- 
khanji is granted 
2nd Class Magis- 
terial powers as 
a personal dis- 
tinction. 

Not classified- 
Non Jurisdict- 
ional. Follow- 
ing powers are | 
granted to Tha- 
kor Badurkhanji 
as a personal 
distinction. 
Criminal 
Powers of a 
third Class 
Magistrate. 
Civil. 
Power to hear 
suits up to Rs 
100. 



128 



«i 



1H 



25,505 



U 



17 



15,989 
18,137 



7,529 



23 885 



22,486 



1.660 



5,062 



Paying Rs. 
365-6-2 
as Tanka 
to Chho.ta 
Udepur State 



121313-6 
1300 12 4 



Primogeniture 



2 890 679-3-8 



10J 16 067 



2,925 



1,958 



148-1-4 



Do. 
1U 



Do. 



Do. 



102-4-11 



Do. 



14 



106 



REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



No. 



Name of State. 



Name o£ Chief. 



Date of 
birth of the 

Chief. 



Caste or Tribe. 



*0 



21 



r'alasaui 



Bhilodia 



2'2 



Nangam 



23 



-24 



Vasan Virpoor 

(a) Virpur 
Division 

(b) Savli 
Division 

i(c)Vasan 



Vohra 



Thakor Fate sing 



. Thakor Motabwa 
Sonibava 

2 Tbakor 
Motising Hari- 
bava 

1 Tbakor Chhita- 

bawa Kaslabawa 
I Thakor 

Sardarkhan 

Badarbava 
3 Thakor 

Manoverkhan 

Dilaverkhan 
I Thakor 

Naikhan 

Jitbha 

(a) Thakor 
Gambiiirsing 
Bhaibawa 

(b) Chhatrasing 
Bhaibawa 

(o) Thakor 
Jaswatsing 
Jorabawa 

Thakor 

Babadurkhanji 
*•> otabawa 
minor (Agency 
managemtnt.) 




1903 
1855 

1905 

1862 

1863 

1858 
I$75 



1901 



Rajput 

Parmar. 



Rajput 
Chavda 



Molesalatn 

Rathod 

Do. 



Do. 



Dd. 



Molesalam 
Daima 

Do. 

Do. 



Do. 



DITAILBD PABTICUL4B8 OP STATB9. 



lift 



Class of 
Jurisdiction 
or powers 



Area of 

State in 

square 

miles. 



Estimated 
revenue 



Population. 



Tribute to Whether the 
ii. H. the custom of primo- 
Gaekwar geniture prevails 
or Govt. | or partition. 



Do. 
Do. 



12 



m 



H 



9499 



8293 



8808 



3815 



13516 

13275 

7099 

9726 



2.275 



1.151 



1000 



507 



3,722 



1639-3-8 



933 1 3 



933 1-3 



995-6-2 



Primogeniture 



Do. 



1,322 



I 

I 

^ 332-4-1 i 



Do. 



Par :i ton? 



655-5 2 



v a) Part Ho ft- 



(b) Primo- 
geniture. 

(c) Partition. 



Primogenitor* 



*.* 



BBWI KAUTH1 DIRECTORY. 



\No. 



Name oE Sfcaie. 



Name of Chief, 



25 



26 
27 

28 

29 

30 
31 

32 



Vasan Sevada ... 



Aiwa 
Chorangla .. 

SindHajura ... 

Bibora 

VftdiaVirampura 
Dadhpur 



Thnkor Isafkhanji 
Joraverkhanji 
minor 
(Agency aaanage- 
ment) 

Thakor Khuaal- 
bava Sardarkhan 

Thakor 
Cbhatrasingji 

Thakor 

Mabmadkhan 
Aniirkban 

Thakor 

Hetamkhan 
Sardarkhan 

Thakor 

Ahmadkhan 

Thakor 
Anopsing 
Dadabava 



Date of 
birth of the Caste or Tribe. 
Chief. 



11-11-1901 



Rainpura 1 Thakor 

Hiraateing 



Madhavsing 

2 Thakor 
Khusalbava 
Joiabava 

3 Partapba widow 
of Tbakor 
Nathubava 
Dulabava 



1855 

9-6-80 

80-4-02 

1882 

5—1—82 
1879 

1845 
1851 
1871 



Molesalaoi 
Rathod 



Molesal&m 
Chohan 

Rajput 
Rathod 

Motesalam 
Chobau 



Molesalwra 
Rathod 



M lesaiam 
Dai ma 

Molesalaoi 
Rathod 



1 Rajput 
Chavda 



DETAILED PABTICULARS CF WATES. 



109 



Class of 
Jurisdiction 
or powers. 


Area of 

State in 
square 
miles. 


Estimated 
Revenue. 


Population. 


Tribute to 

H. H. the 

Graekwar 

or Govt. 


Whether the 
custom o£ primo- 
geniture prevaila 
or partition. 


Do. 


5} 


7,063 


1,301 


885-6-1 


Primogeniture 




5 


8,876 


1,517 


51-8-7 


Do. 




16 

4 


G184 

1000 
Bhayati 
estates. 

5 359 


2,182 

774. 


73-1-3 
43-13-6 


Do. 
Do, 




H 


2,008 


230 


39-3-8 


Do. 5 




i 


752 


96 


79-3-8 


Do. ^ 




3. 

4 


706 


107 


26-14-9 


Da. 




** 


12,200 


1,757 


109313-6 


Partition. 




> 


» 









110 



RBWA KANTHA DIBBCTOBT. 









Date of 




Mo. 


Name of State. 


Name of Chief. 


birth of the 
Chief. 


Caste or Tribe 






4 Thakor 


| 1885 








Dajibawa 


> 








Natbubava 










5 Thakor 


1876 








Madhavsing 










Natbubava 










6 Thakor 


1880 








Prabhatsing 










Nathubawa 










7 Thakor 










Chhatrasing 










K alubava 










8 Thakor 


18S8 








Bharatsing 










Bhiniging 






33 


Jircl Kamsoli 


1 Thakor 
Nurkhan 
Rasulkhan 


26-9-92 


Ghori 
Musalman 






Thakor 


1895 


Do 






Manoverkhan 










Thakor 


1898 


Do. 






Ahmedkhan 










2 Thakor 


1864 


Do. 






Motabava 






.< 




Hafiabava 






34 


Cbudesar 


1 Thakor 
Kesarkhan 
Bhaibava 


1872 








2 Thakor 


1897 








Bad bark h an 










Chitabava 










3 Thakor 


1868 


3 

2 






Kesarkhan 








Rahimkhan 




'§ 






4 Thakor 


1857 


V -8 






Chandabava 








Sherbhai 







DETAILID PARTICULARS OF STATES. 



HI 



Class of 
Jurisdiction 
or powers. 



Arei ot 

State in 

square 

miles. 



Estimated 
revenue. 



Population 



Tribute to 
3. H. the 
Gaekwar 
or Govt 



Whether the 
custom of* primo- 
geniture prevails 
or partition. 



9,901 



2£ 3,607 



1,096 



556 



256-2-4 Partition 



239-3-8 



Da. 



112 



WIWA KAJWHA D1BBC10BY. 









Date of 




No. 


Name of State. 


Name of Chief. 


birth of the 
Chief. 


Caste or Tribe. 






5 Thakor 


1866 


c 






Kayamkhan 




S 






Jilabava 








6 Thakor 


1893 








Naherkhan 










Alamkhan 




O 


85 


Pantalavdi ... 


1 Thakor 


4-1-1900 


1 Molesalata 






Anverkhan 








Akbarkhan 








2 Thakor 


1885 


Padhiar 






Sahebkhan 










Keebarkhan 






36 


Rangan 

< 


1 Thakor 
Khusalbava 
BaBuikhan 

2 Tbakor 
Sajansing 
Motabava 

3 Thakor 
Bbaibava 
Jorabava 

4 Umedba widow 
of Thakor 
Jesing Alibhai 

5 Thakor 
Babadurkhan t 
Nathukhan 

6 Chunma, widow 
of Bapubbai 
Fatebhai 

7 Thakor 
Badrudin 
Vmedbhai 


15-12-13 
1879 
1888 
1880 | 
1847 
1858 
1849 


•> 
i 

I 

y Molesalam 
Daima 


3ir 

i 


Nalia 


1 Thakor 
Jitkhan 
Alamkhan 


1882 


Ghori 
Musalman. 



DETAILED PARTICULARS OF STATES. 



113 



Class of 
Jurisdiction 
or powers. 



Area of 
State in 
square 
miles 



Estimated 
revenue 



Population 



Tribute to) Whether the 
H. H. the custom o£ prima- 
Gaekwar Igeniture prevails 
Govt. J or partition. 



or 



3272 



2970 



2501 



437 



497 



451 



354-9-10 



Primogeniture 



Do. 



Partition. 



1035 



167 



28-7-5 



Do. 



15 



114 



BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 









Date o£ 




No 


Name of State. 


Name of Chief. 


oirth o£ the 
Chief. 


Caste or Tribe 






3 Thakore 


1885 








Fatekhan 










Alamkban 










3 Thakor 


Not 








Umedkhsn 


available 








Alamkban 






•> 




4 Tbakor 


Not 








Nasirkhan 


available 








Kbusalbava 










5 Thakor 


1855 








Kuberkban 










Jitabava 










6 Thakor 


Not 








Rasulkhsn 


available. 








Hetamlthan 








Pandu Mewas 






Baria Parmar 


38 


Sihora 


Kanma!swgji 
Karansangji 


10-1-1902 


Solanki 


39 


Chbaliar 


Hamsingji 
liidrasingji 


1913 


Rajput 


40 


Panda 


I Khanjada 
Akbarkban 
Bahadarkhan 

2 Kbanjada 
Kanmastakhan 
Ahmedkban 


5-11-1898 

1878 








1 Khanjada 


1893 








Sikdarklia 




)■ Pathao 






Tajukhan 




M usalmau 






2 Sardarbibi, 


1862 








widow of late 










Nathukban 










Mansurkhan 










3 Khanjada 


1905 


, 


- 




Ayubkban 






i 




EUmirkhan 







DETAILED PARTICULARS OF STATES. 



iii 



Class of 
Jurisdiction 
or powers. 



Area of 

State in 

square 

miles. 



Estimated 
revenue. 



Population 



Tribute k 
H. rl. the 
Gaekwar 
or Govt. 



Whether the 
custom of prii 
greniture prevadfe 
or partition 



VI 



15£ 



30,748 



3,835 



3 693 



Primogeniture* 



VI 



11 



12,215 



2,547 



2,616 



Dow 



3.960 



: 1,960 



1,731 



Partition. 



116 



BBWA KAHTHA DIRECTORY. 







i 


Date o£ 




No. 


Name of State. 


Name o£ Chief. 


birth of: the 
Chief. 


Caste or Tribe 


41 


\ 

Mevli 


1 Pagi 

Samatsang 
Dhenibh*i 


1893 


i 






2 Andarsang 


1858 


J> Pagi Koii 






Gamirsang 




t 






3 Bhemeing 


1897 


\ 






Dajibhai 




J 


42 


Kanoda 


1 Fatehsing 
Kubersing 


1907 


1 

i 






2 Thackerani 


1856 


i Baria 
i Parmar 






Bijiba 








3 Jiv^bhai 


1879 


1 






Sivsing 




J 


43 


Poicha 


1 Khumansing 
Himatsing 

2 Chandrasicg 
Kancbod 

3 Himatsing 
Gagabbai 


1872 
1888 
1870 








4 Jenabhai 


1868 


Wagheia 

Rajput 

* 






Parbatsing 








5 Thackerani 


1894 








Rupaliba, widow 










of late Kanbhai 










Lakhbhai 










6 Himatsing 


1887 


t 






Waghji 




44 


Dhari 


1 Vakhateing 
Nathoobbai 


27-4-1906 








2 Haisingji 
Sivsingji 

3 Udtsing 


1866 
25 6 94 


' Solaoki 
\- Rajput 

1 

I 






Gumasing 








i Somabbai 


23-3-99 






Sahebsing 




1 

J 






5 Salemsing 


1885 






Rupabbai 




1 

> 



DETAILED PATTICULARS OP STATES* 



117 



Class of 

Jurisdiction 

or powers 



Area o£ 

State in 

square 

miles. 



Estimated 
revenue. 



Population 



Tribute to 
H. H. the 
Gaekwar 
or Govt. 



Whether the 
custom of primes 
geniture prevails 
or partition. 



31 



3f 



n 



i 



6 487 



2,214 



1,600 



1 404 



1206 



909 



4 358 



1,210 



1,155 



1,232 



1,155 



732 



Partition. 



Da. 



Do. 



Do. 



118 



BBWA KANTHA DIBECTOBT. 









Date of 




; 


Ko. 


Name o£ State. 


Name o£ Chief. 


birth of the 
Chief. 


Caste or Tribe. 




45 


ItW8d 


1 Partapsing 


1893 


-i 






Jhinabbai 












2 Motising 

A 


1971 


• Rathod 
j Rujput. 








Amaramg 
3 Vajesing 


1879 








Gulabsing 




1 








4 Jeebbai Sivbhai 


1663 


J 


: 


46 


Gotardi 


1 Hathibhai 
Jethibhai 

2 Dayabhai 
Sivabhai 

3 Bhimsing 
Bhakeibhai 


1885 
1884 
1919 


J- Koli. 








4 Ghinabhai 


1892 


J 








Khujabbai 








47 


Little Gothda 


1 Jeebhai Dala 


1874 


) 




1 


2 Natha Mathiji 

3 Gaba Kala 


1881 
1889 


[ Do. 








4 Moti GuJab 


1834 


) 




48 


Amrapur 


1 Prabhatsing 
SivsiDg 


1876 


1 
j 








2 Amarsing 


1886 


1 








Bhulabbai 




! Baria 
f Solanki 




i 


3 Somabbai 


1896 








Ramsing 












4 Abhesing 


1889 


1 

i 








Gabhirbhai 




J 




49 


Vakhtapur 


1 Chhatrasing 
Navaleing 


1890 


1 








2 Anarsing 


1881 


> Solanki 








Nathoobhai 




I Rajput. 


« 




j 


3 Bai Takhtaba 

c 


1901 


J 


< 



DETAILED PARTICULARS OF STATES. 



119 



Class o£ 

Jurisdiction 
or powers. 



Area o£ 

State in 
square 
miles. 



ii 



2 



H 



Estimated 
revenue. 



Population, 



Tribute to 
H. H. the 

Gaekwar 
or Govt. 



Whether the 
custom of primo- 
geniture prevails 

or partition. 



1443 



698 



4,518 



500 



1,435 



1,393 



334 



462 



Partition 



327 



Do. 



598 



155 



Do. 



311 



155 



Do. 



304 



116 



Do. 



120 



BEW A KAHTHA DIRECTORY. 



No. 



50 



51 



52 



53 

54 
55 
56 



Name of State. 



Name of Chief. 



Date of 

birth of the 

Chief. 



Caste or Tribe, 



Jesar 



Moka Paginu 
Muvadu 



RaelayPaginu 
Muvadu 



Rajpur 
Moti Varnoli 
Jumakha 
Nahara 



1 Gng?ibhai 
Khatubhai 

9 Bhatbibhai 
Gok^Ibbai 

3 Bai Suraj 

4 Damabhai 
Dayabhai 

1 Mabhai 
Gembhai 

2 Ramsinp; 
-Nathabhai 

1 Nathabhai 
Haribhai 

2 1 Melsing 
Chandrasing 

3 Jivabhai 
Jerbhai 

4 Parbhatsing 
Kbatubhai 

1 Himatsing 
Sursing 

Ratansing 
Bbagwausing 

Raising 
Chandrasing 

1 Kalubbai 
Jesangbbai 

2 Mobanbbai 
Patbibbai 



1871 

1S85 

1879 
1890 

1863 
1896 

1866 
1893 
1883 
1890 

1979 

13-3 88 

1884 

1876 
1894 



^ Koli 



Do. 



Do. 



Solan ki 
Rajput 

Rathod 
Rajput 

Par mar Baria 



i 



Parmar 
Baria 



DBTAHJED PABMCBiABS Of STATES. 



121- 



Class of 

Jurisdiction 
•r powers. 


Area of 

State in 

square 

miles. 


Estimated 
revenue 


Population 


Tribute to 

H. H. the 

Gaekwar 

oi Govt. 


Whether the 
custom of primo- 
geniture prevails 
' or partition. 




H 


450 


467 


116 


Partition 




1 


400 


156 


96 


Partitioii 




1 


300 


101 


50 


Partition 




H 


600 


1 
119 


39 


Primogeniture 




2 


724 


247 


78 


Do. 




1 


450 


215 


39 


Do. 




3 


75 


346 


19 


Partition 



16 



122 



BBWA KAKTHA DIRBCTOKT. 



No. 



57 



58 



59 



60 



<61 



Name of State 



Dodka 



Arigadh 



Rayka 



Name o£ Chief. 



Dale of | .. _, , 

birth of the 0*** ar Tribe. 
Chief. I 



Nani Varnoli 



Varnol Mai ... 



1 Jinabhai 
Kanbhai. 

2 Bbulabbai 
MojabhaU 



1 Kalubbai 



Jesangbhau 
2 Fakirbhai 
Parbatbhaj. 

1 Rhaiikar : 
Karson. 

2 Ishwar 
Jibbai. 

I Hiraataing 

Nithoobaya. 
1 Khumansiog 

Massing. 
1 Udesingji 

Mulsingji. 
1 Samatsing 

Himatsing. 
1 Ke?ari$ing 

Parvatsing. 
I Fatesing 

Motuing. 

1 Natvarsingji 
Motisingji. 

1 Pagedaraabai 
Laxinibai. 




Parmar 

Rajput 
Mahratta 



I>KTA1UU> particulars of states. 



123 



Class of 
Jurisdiction 
or powers. 



Area of 

State in 

square 

miles. 



Estimated 
revenue. 



Population 



Tribute to 
|H H. the 
Gaekwar 
or Govt. 



Whether the 
custom of primo- 
geniture prevals 
or partition. 



H 



H 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Do. 

3 
Do 



433 


72 


19 


1230 


553 


65 


8567 


904 


850 


1742 


338 


224 


778 


Do. 


336 


1881 


Do. 


112 


1522 


Do. 


269 


649 


Do. 


269 


1317 


De. 


134 


2596 


517 


235 


1577 


Do. 


208 



Fnmogeniture 



Partition. 



Voting right 



Partition.. 

Do. 
Do. 

Da. 

Do. 

Do. 

Paj tition. 
Do. 



124 - MWA KANTHA DIBBCTORY. 

MODE 0? ADDRESSING} PRINOE* AND CHIEFS 

OF THE REWAKANCHA Br THE AGENGY. 

( In English. ) 

1. Captain His Highness Maharana Shri Vijaysialiji, 

Maharaja of Rajpipla, 

Your Highness, 

2. Mahara^l Shri Fatehsinhji, Raja of Chhota Udepur, 

My Friend. 

8. Captain His Highness Maharaol Shri Ranjitsinhji, 
Raja of Baria, 

Your Highness, 

4. His Highness Maharana Shri Sir Vakhatsinhji, 
K, CLE, Raja of Lunawada, 
Your Highness, 

5. Babi Shri Jamiatkhanji, Nawab of Balasinor, 
My Friend. 

6 # Maharaua Shri Jorawirsingji, Rija of Suhth, 

My Friend. 

7. Rana Shri Chhatrasalji, Ttakor of Kadana State, 

Sir. 

8 Meherban Rana Rmjitsinbji, Thakor of Bhadarqr&, Sir. 

9. Meherban Pushpsingji, Thakor of Sanjeli, 

10. Azam G mpatsingji, Thakor of Uoaetha. 

11. Az*m Ranjitsingji, Thakor of Jambug'iods. 

12. Azam Khusalsingji, Thakor of Mandwa. 

13. Azam Kesarkhan, Thakor of Vajiria. 

And so on with all petty jurisdictional Chiefs 



BBWA KAHTHA DIRECTORY. 125 

\ S^VHH ^RctH Vdd MteRt^l ^l ft**H- *Hal£& »PK$IKt 

£&'&&, Hl&Rl«l *T. *W*Qx<fll, si. ^!. §. *H*«m HI. 3i. Vtl*l&t, 

^iwl29 WWW $Ul§^ St. *U. §. 
&'&£>, *1"129 tt>*ll*t "itfUHl St. >U. §. 

a 5U. j. 

h JUvhm todrt M^rti^t *Q ^UrttGuM*, *e$. 

>HH22, *i*m *U<H tfWM <*Uttfl3K, SI. >U. *. 

tf ^VHH SltttW ^i^l^fl tMat«5? f Jt*R, *CL 

*U*4l*i WU^l, SI. $U. §. 

*»etiM to*. 

IV wtWH ^uKuM? <HRdRt"&22, il*R taftl&tlfc, 

1M-VI «Kl*n *OHcXlfl <U^U £h* *IH*, HHIlil, tt&tt, W<B^ 



126 SBWA KAMTHA DIBSCTOST. 

LIST OF SCHOOLS IN THE REWA KANTflA AGENCS. 



No. 



Name of School. 



Remark. 



1 

2 
3 
4 

6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



KAJPIPLA STATE 

Nandod High School. 

Nandod Sanskrit Pathshtla .. 

Nandod Taloka Sohool 

Nandod Branch S> h k>1 No. 1 .. 

Nandod Branch School No. 2.. 

Nandod Girls Sohool 

Nandod Urdu School 

Nandod School for depressed 
classes ... ... .. 

Bhadatn Main School , 

Bhadatn Girls School ... 

Vawadi School ... ... .„ 

Lachhra8 Man School 

Lachbras Girls School ... . M 

OH Sohool 

Mangrol School 

Waghetha School 

Dhamnacha School ... ... 

Amletha School ... .„ 



Wi h Erglisb CUuw. 



Girls learn along with 
boys. 
With English Class 



Girls learn along with 
bovs 
Do. 



Girls learn along witb 
toye. 



SCHOOL*. 



1ST 



No. 



Name of behoof. 



Remarks. 



I 

19 
2o 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 

29 
30 
31 



Bhacbarwada School 
Nikoli School 
Rundb School ... 
Sehera* I School ... ... 

Tankari School 

Jior School ••• ... 

Karantl a School . ... 

Sisodra; Main School ... 

Sisodra Girls School ... 

Gopalpura School ..... 
BHALOD TALUKA. 

Bhalod Taluka School ... 

Bhalod Girls School 
Panebha Main School ... 



Girls learn abng with 
boys 
Do. 

Do. 

'-'■'■■ Do. 
Do. 



Girls learn along with 

boys. 
With English class. • 



Girls learn along wibh 
With English class. 



With Englieh class. 



32 Panetha Girls Sohoal 



33 
34 
35 
36 
37 



Umarva School ... 

Umarva Girls School ... 

Umalla School ... ... 

Tarsalt School ~. 

Vaghodia Sohool ■' M 



38 I Navara School 



«•• *«• * 



Girls learn along with 

boys. 
With Urdu class. 

Girls learn along with 
boys. 
Do. 



128 



BBVA KAMTHA »1B1CT0*T. 



No 


Name of SchooL 




Remark. 


39 
40 


A* a school 
Kandroj School 


••• 
••• 


i 

• •• 


Girls learn along with 
boys. 
Do. 


41 


Umadbra , f ••• 


»»<• 


••• 


Do. 


42 


Vanak^ur School 


••• 


• •• 


Do. 


43 


Indor School 


••• 


• •• 


Do. 


44 


Tothidra School 


••• 


• •• 


Da 


45 


Velugara school ..• 


»•• 


• •• 


Do. 


46 


Sars* sqhool — 


••• 


••» 


Do. 


47 


Par tapr agar school 


••• 


• •• 


Do. 


48 


Prarikad SiAool ..• 


•*. 


••• 




49 


Fhiohwada school 


••• 


• •• 


Dx 


SO 


Rajavadia school 


••• 


••• 


Do. 


51 


Sanjali school •*• 


•mm 


• •• 


Do. 


52 


Jamhoi school ... 


*•% 


• •• 


Do. 


58 


Raisingpura school 


»•• 


• •• 






JHAGDIA TALUKA 






54 


Jhagadia Talnka school 


• •• 




55 


Jbagadia Girls tchool 


... 


• •• 


*> 


56 


Afidha main school 


• •• 


• •• 




57 


Avidha Girls school 


• •• 


••• 







BVJOL VUJU0* 






No. 


Name of School. 


Remarks. 


58 
59 
60 


Avidha Bchool for depress :d 

classes 
Pardi school ... 

Kharchi schorl 


•• • 

••• 


With English classes 
Girls learn with boys. 
Do. 


61 


Govali school 


••• 


Do. 


62 


Govali Dhed Evening school 


... 




63 
64 


Uchedia school ... 
Selod school ~. 


••• 


Girls learn along with 
boys. 
D. 


65 


Talodra school 


... 


Do. 


66 


Dharoli school ... 


.. • 


Do. 


67 


Ranipura school... 


... 


Do. 


68 


Limet school ... ... 


••• 


Do, 


69 


Nahana Sanja school ... 


... 


Do. 


70 


Jarsad school ... 


... 


Do. 


71 


Eapalsadi school 

VALIk TALUKA, 


••• 


With Urdu class. Girls 
lawrn along with boys. 


72 
73 


Valia school 
Kondh school ... 


... 
••• 


Girls learn along with 

boys 
G rls learn %lon<r with 

boys, with Urdu 

class also. 


74 
75 


Siludi sol ool 
Desad school ,.. 

17 


••• 


Giils learn along with 
boys. 
Do. 



130 



IUOTA K1MTHA D1RBCTOBY. 



No. 


Name of school. 


Remark. 


76 

77 


Luna school 

Bharan school ... ' ... 


Girls learn alopg wifcjt 
boys. . 

Do. 


78 


Deheli school 


Do. 


79 


Gandhu school ... ... 


Do. 


80 


Tuna school 


Do. 


$1 


Mela school 


Do. 


82 


Dungri school ... 


Do. 


83 


Vadi school ... .*. 
GARDESHVAR TALUKA. 


Do. 


84 
85 


Gardeshvar school 

Boria school 


Girls lfarn along with. 
boys. 
Do. 


86 


Khadagda school ... ... 




87 


Jhariavadi school ... 
DEDIAPADA TALUKA. 




88 


Dediapada ... ... 




89 


Kundia Araba ... 






^!»»€<^ 







SCHOOLS* 


131 


No. 


Name of school. 


Remarks, 




BARIA. STATE. 




1-4 


Devgadh Baria 

(1) Shri Ranjitsinhji High School 

(2) Taluka Gujrati School. 
(8) Kanyashala. 

(4) Madresa, 




5 


Piplod School 


^* 


6 


Paroli t , 




7 


Bakrol , , 




8 


Gogamba ,, 




9 


Bancibar „ 




10 


Dudhia f> 


)- Girls are also ad- 


11 


Simalia 9> 


1 mitted to and do 
attend these schools. 


12 


Randhikpur , 




13 


Farod „ 




14 


Dantol „ 


I 


15 


Limkheda ,> 




16 


Ranjitnagar,, 


j 



IZi 



REWA KA.KTHA DIRECTORY. 



LIST ot Schools in the native States of the Rewattantfn 
Agency under the control o£ the Educational Department. 



» 



»t 



(I) Chhota Udepur State. 

, I. Chhota Udepur A. V. 
School (teaching upto the 
5th standard). 

2. Do. Taluka school 

3. Do. Urdu „ 

4. Do. Girls 

5. Jabugam. „ 
6 Jetpur. 

7. Tpjgadh. 

8. Kavant Boys 

9. Do. Girls 

10. Panvad. 

11. Chalamli 

12. Chnatrali. 

13. rvndachla. 

14. Booeli 
15/ Kaival. 

16. Vanta, 

17. Khadakwada. 

18. Bhikhapura. 

19. S*skal. 

20. Bhumaswada. 

21. Karaii. 

22. Moradungari* 

23. Pandhra. 

24. Vaghach. 

25. Khantiavant. 

26. Zojh. 

27. Uroarva. 

28. Kashipur*. 



t» 



»t 



tt 



t» 



29, 
30. 
31. 

1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10 
11 
12. 
13 
14 

1 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
II. 
12. 



AraaroL 
Devhat. 
Kaiarani. 



school 



(2) Lanavada State. 
Lunawada Main school. 



High school* 
Urdu class. 
Girls. 



Do. 
Do. 

Do,- 

Vardhari. 

Khan pur. 

Kothamba. 

Bakor. 

Ram Patel's JVC uvad*. 

Maghwa?. 

Malekpur. 

Kharol. 

Limadia. 

Pandarwada. 

(3) Balasinor State. 
Balasinor Main. 

Do. Gujrati Gids. 
Do. Urdu Boys*. 
Do. Urdu Girls. 
Do. A. V. schooL 
Virpnr. 

Virpur English Glass. 
Do. girls schooL 



Do. 

Debhari. 

Jetholi. 

Koydam. 



Urdu Boys. 



SCHOOLS. 



13$ 



13. Pandwa. 

14. Kharoii. 
15 Jorapura. 

(4) Sunth JRampur State. 

1 Sunth Rsmpur Afaia. 

2. Do. Girls. 

3. Do. E.igii3h % 

4. Malvan. 

5. Sunth. 

6. P&rtapgadh. 

7. Undara 

8. Fatehpura. 

9. Gotjhibfc. 

10. Afava. 

11. Hirapur. 

12. Nandukaa. 

13. Sarsan. 

(5) Kadana Stale. 

1. Kadana. 

2. Manupur. 

3. Velanwada. 

(6) Bhadarwa State. 

1. Bhadarwa. 

2. Vankaner. 

3. Mokshi. 

4. Bhadarwa Girls*. 

5. Jaspur. 

6 Ranch hod pura. 

(7) San jell Stole. 
1 Sanjeli. 

2. Tarkdamahudi. 

(8) Umetha Stale. 

Q 

I. Navakhal. . 



2. Nanisherdi. 

3. Bilpad; 

(9) Jamfnujkoda State. 

\. Jambughoda. 

2. Haveli. 

3. Vizran. 

4. Khandiwav. 

5. Chalwad. 

(10) Sankheda Metcas. 

1. Mandwa Main, 

2. Do. Girls. 

3. Do. Class. 

4. Do. • Erjglishu 

5. Naswadi. 
6 Agar. 

7. Anor. 

8. Vajiria. 

9. Bhilodia* 

10. VVra 

11. Wadia. 

12. Savali. 

3 3. Bortalav. 

14. Chudeshwar. 

15. Rampura. 

16. Chorangala. 

17. Sanor. 

18. Palasam 

19. Vasan Savda. 

20. Kathadpur*. 

21. Nandena. 

22. Sampura. 

23. Uchad. 

24. Sindhiapura. 

25. Vohra. 



134 



JOWJl xantha directobt. 



(11) Pandu Mew as. 



1. Panda. 
2 Shihora. 

3. Dhari. 

4. Angadh. 

5. Dodka. 

6. Chhalier. 

7. Naharpura* 

8. Mevli. 






9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16 


Gothada. 
Ganeshpura. 
Itwad. 

Parthampura, 
Dolatpura. 
Limdi. 
Nhara. 
. Vasanpura, 






&&%>£<> 




ABSTRACT. 


Rajpipla State 
Baria ... 


••• 


• •• 

• •• 




... 89 1 Cont 
... 16/ reap 


Chbota Udepur 
Xiunawada •*• 


••• 
••• 


... 
••• 




... 31 

... 14 


Balasinor ..• 


••• 


• •» 


4 


... 15 


Sunth Ram pur 
Kadana 


... 
••• 


... 
• «« 




... 13 
... 3 


Bhadarwa 


•mm 


... 




6 


Sanjeli 
Umetha 


... 


• •• 
••• 




... 2 
... o 


Jambughoda ... 
Sankheda Me was 


•mm 


... 
• •• 




... o 

... 25 


Pandu Mewas 


m— 


• •• 




„. 16 






Total. 


.. 238 



respective States. 



HOSPITALS AltD DISFKHSABH&* 



13S 



LIST of Hospitals and Dispensaries in the Rewa Kantha 

Agency. 



No. 



Name of btate 



Place where there 
is a Hospital 
or Dispensary* 



Remarks* 



Rajpipla 



Chhota Udepur... 



Baria 



Lunawada 



Balaainor 



Nandod 

Jhagadia 

Vaiia 

Gandh«shwar 

Bhalod 

Gardeshwar 

Dediapada 

Chhota Udepur: — 

(1) One for men 

(2) One for women 

(3) Veterinary 
Hospital 

(4) Gfaelwant 
Dispensary 

Jet pur 

Kawant 

Chalamli 

Baria: — 

(1) One for men 

(2) Oae for women 

(3) Veterinary 
Hospital 

(4) Palace Dispensary 
Dudhia 

Rajgadh 

Lunavada: — 

(1) For men and 
women 

(2) Travelling 
Dispensary 

B'alasinor 



136 



**WA. K&NTH& MKXCTOKY. 



No, 



Name of State. 



Place irhere there 

is a Dispensary 

or Hospital. 



Eemarl 



Sunth Rampur... 



Kadana 



9 



10 



11 



Bhad*rwa ... Bbadarwa 



Rampur 



Kadana 



Sanjeli 



Narukot 



Sanjeli 



Jarnbnghoda I 

Bhil Corps Hospital 



Sankheda Mew as Wadia 
Chanod 
Vajiria 
Matdwa 



12 Panda Me was 



Panda 
Sihora 



ABSTRACT. 










Rajpipla .-, 


••• 


7 


Kadana ... ••• 


i 


Chhota Udepar 


••• 


7 


Bhadarwa 


i 


Baria 


••• 


6 


Sanjeli 


i 


Ltfnavada ... 


••• 


2 


Narukot ... 


2 


Balasinor ~~ 


mmm 


1 


Sankheda Me was... 


4 


Sunth .•• 


• •• 


1 
Total., 


Panda „ ••• 
,35 


2 



POST, TELEGRAM AND TELB PHONE. 



137 



IjIST of Post, Telegraph and Telephone Offices in the 
Rewa Kantba. 



! 




Name of town or 


Whether it has 
a Telegraph 




Ko. 


Name of State 


village which has 


Urn 


1 




a Post Office. 


or Telephone 
Office. 


a 


1 


Bajpipla ## , Nandod 


Telegraph & 










Telephone. 








Jhagadhia 


Telegraph. 








Bhalod 










Gardeshwar 










Valia 










R«j Pardi 


Do. 








Dediapada 










Avidha 










TJmalla 


Do. 








Pratapnagar 


GumandeT 








Deheli 






< 




Vavdi 






! 


1 Laehhras 










Sisodra 










Cbhota Udepur. 


Telegraph & 




2 


Cbhota Udepui 


Karant 
Jabugam 

Panvad 
Tejgadh 

Jetpur 
PaTi 


Telephone. 
Telephone. 
Telegraph k 
Telephone. 
Telephone. 
Tek graph and 

Telephone. 
Telephone. 
Telegraph and 

Telephone. 
Dhokalia 




3 


Devgadh Baria 


Baria 

Piplod 


Telegraph and 
I Telephone. 
Do. Do. 





n 



138 



BEWA KAKTHA DIBBCTORY. 



N<- 



4 
5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 



13 



Name of StaU 



Lunavada 
Balasinor 

Sunth 

Kadana 
Bhaciarwa 

Sanjeli 
Umetha 
Nnrukot 
Patdu Mowas 



Name of town or 

village which hap 

a Post Office. 



Sankheda Mew as 



Whether it has* 
a Telegraph 
or Telephone 
Office. 



*-» 

a 

P5 



Lirnkhaua 

Mangal Mahudi 

Rajgadh 



Lunavada 
Balasinor 
Virpur 
Ram pur 

Kadana 
Baadarwa 

Sanje i 

Umeth* 

Jambughoda 

Pandu 

Chhaliar 

Sihora 

Angadh 



Chsnod 

VajiriM 

Vadia 

Naswadi 

Agar 

Bhilodia 

Vohra 

Shauor 



leiegr^pu aud 
Telephone 
Telegraph 
Dudhia 
Rnndhikpur 
Umaria 
Dhanpur 
Valundi 
Sagtala 
Maloo 
Telegraph Office 



Telegraph and 
Telephone 



n 

!? 



Telegraph 
Gothada 
Mevli 
Vasanpura 
Telegraph Office 1 



KAILWAYS. 



139 



IiIST of Railways passing through th9 Rewa Kantha Agency. 



Name of Railway. 



Names of station 
situated ia Rewa 
Kantha. 



Remark?. 



(I) B. B. &C.I. 
Railway. 



(2) Guzarat Railways. 
Gcdhra-Lunavada 

(3) Timba Samlaya 
Railway (Baroda 
State.) 



(4) Shivraj Pani 
Light Railway. 

(5) Gaekwar's 
Dabhoi Railway. 



Timba (Gothda) 
Piplod (Baria) 
Limkheda (Baria) 
Manual Mahudi 
(Baria) 

Vasad (Dodka and 

Ramka) 
Ranoli (Dodka and 

Ramka) 

Lunavada 

Gothda (Pandu Mewas) 

Pandu (Do.) 

Mevali (Do.) 

Vasanpara Alias 
Ganeshpura (Do.) 
Dasar Road (Itatwad.) 
Savli (Kanoda Poiya) 
Nathpura (Baria) 

Chanod (Mandwa) 



140 



BSWA K4-HTHA DIRECTORY. 



Name of Railway. 



Names of Stations 
situated in Rewa- 
Kantha. 



Remarks. 



(6) Bodeii Chhota- 
Udepur Railway. 


Jabugam ( Chhota 

Udepur^ 
Pavi (Da) 

Tejgadh (Do.) 

Chhota Udepar (Do.) 




(7) Rajpipla State 


Nandod 




Railway 


Amietha 

Pratapnagar 

Umalla 

Haripara 

Rajpardi 

Avidha 

Jhagadhi* 






Gumandeo 




Boridra 






Umravti 




(8> Gaekwtr's 
Motipura Jankhala 
Railway. 


Ankleshwar (British) 

Naswar 

• 


Here is the 
Junction with 
the B. B. & 
C I. Railway. 



80ADS. 



141 



OS 

a 



o 

£0 



"3 

^3 



03 

as 
o 



© 
OS 

a 



as a 
2 beg 



< 









o 





as 


• 

03 


& 


(4 


*a 


cfl 


00 


Si 


a> 


CO 




o 

-*3 


O 




•+^ 


o 


O 


&0 


Ctf 


o 


o 


H 


H 



psil^pw 



a 



QOOO^ONCOCO^QOOTfOCONi 



OOOOOOO 0000000*0000 



o 



3 



EH 

35 
H 

CO 



o 



- -r ^ 5 «; (C bo-- 

^OJDG^T3-*?-§.2a5>03O' 



cO 
> 

""53 

OS "U > 



• *-« «• *■* 
5 



bO 






<D 

GO 

o 

© 

a 

CO 



T3 co U -g ^ 
o-o 2 « O 



i -a ^ T3 

^5 ^q _« cc -o 



CO 



05 

'■o .2 * -a -o .2" 1 

a3 qj 3 03 <C 



.2 .2 



c ^q cq cc -c £ «3 tp 3 aj c <s « 



2 GO as 

; JZ so so 

O OS CQ 



JO 

"cu 

« 



o 
"A 



aMat 



141 



SEW A KA.HTHA.. DIKECTOBY. 

















c 


^ ^ 
















o 


r-< Zt* 


















































~ « 


-s <2 
















£ ° 


T5_< {3 "S 




, 












C ** 


f5 r' 03 h-» 
















:2 « 


08 ."S ^^ 

^ ° &-*« 

s ® 3 






% 










«-o o 




S-4 


> 










K^ 






or 


cC 










m G 


_G -* J » — ' 




s 

o> 












c ^ 


-+-s -*-• t- -1 




P5 


o 
o 
o 

-4J 










S a 
o 




<o 


-pauw* 2 


-* CO 


• oo 


CO 








CO 




•S o 


?<>N 


o ~* 


> T— 1 


CM 












C3 _- CD 


























h<m : 


• 

• 








• 






^ o o 


v-i • 


• 












9- <t> 


•p»HBjow 




©* 














CL— ' 




















«ri 




















c 


















^ aT 














s* 




O fcf 














s 




^ 














au 








.2 

~o3 .- 


s 

£ 


4=> 






^4 




o 


o £ 


.^ -a 


«5 






~o 






o > 

J~ CD 




> 


S-l 

SJ 


•■a a 


£2 
crt 

K 








tm4 




C3 




3 

CD 








o 






-1 

St > 

a s 

o 


H3 ^3 &D 

>* >- c 

cj » cfi 

08* Ct CD 


^3 

P . 

O 

csfi 

O 

J3 


-43 

c8 


CD 

P 

OS 

+■* 

-£3 


o 
P. 


.5 

2 a 


CD 08 J2 S "2 

5Si5m g 




*•* 


KK2 


o 


WO 




^H 




_ 


<D 




J- 
C3 








• 






cfl 




d* 








• 






-u> 




CD 














CQ 




^O 














Cm 




p 














o 




*: 














<D 




^» 








.s 










o 

o 








• n 






«-— 


















o 




c* 






• 


CO 






1 Jz 


p 



















ROADS. 



145 



00 

3 

a 



CD 

o MJ 

a. © 



a 



•*2 • "S 

S O^ © 

Op2 O .PS 

C5 go 

O « > T3 CS 

. • c * . 

as* 

CS <3 rt 



03 



3 

a 



© 
bo 

© 

E* 






paUBjoui 



a 

SO 



o 
H 



s 



S3 
O 

CS 

.a 

a 

o 



00 



o 



<3> 

en 

-*^ 

o 

a 



o 



KV 






th io eo co io 






c3 



q 






03 
► 
03 
C 
P 



C3 J>- r-. M C3 



2 03 






•af 



H3 »r-< 




d 03 


03 


o H 


•»T3 


r^^ 


P2 T3 cy 


P3 


.S o^O 


03 
C3 


.^ S .5 9 


g a 

pq 2 

CM 


iii) Asa 
Bhutia, 
Pania, 
and Va 


:s 



03 

.fcp 



h 



S3 



a 



U 03 



03 



144 



BJSWA KAflTHA D f lBBCTOKT. 






5; 
5? 



5 



I 



22 



o 

IT* 



^ 






5r 



XT 



s 3; 



f 






& 






5 

* 






<5? 



5? 

\*0 






f 



X 

X 

-r 

5? 






I 



S0A9S. 



145 



0, 

as 

GO 

-o 
o 

ja 
so 
a 

x> 

8 
ha 

<D 

O 



a 






B 



•«1J8 li- 
on .Jj *■ O 



to to "" C S "*3 O , 

,r - p^'g ° 03 pQ c = 



S 


© 




CT3 




t* 


Q 




CM 


P 




Sti 


d 




o 


o 




TO 


o3 
50. 




CO 


a 




TO 


* 




C3 


OS 


p- 
o 






^ p g. 2* 



_q tw © 
C? o 



§ * £ 
oJTS 



© TO 

.5 2 
o .5 

© 



© 



C* 



CO 



CO 



rt* 



© 



© 







DO 

C 
« 

a 



H 

H 
QQ 



a 



o ° 

EH 



a 
© ^ 



93 

o 

•a 

p 
S 



© 

c3 



ce 



g 

•P 

P 
03 

& 



C8 M 

*2 © 

c3 ns 

P "D 

08 03 



: y > 



P^ 



p 
*p 



03 
O 

s 

03 



03 

p 

03 
*P. 



03 


03 


-O 


■"0 


O 


O 


eP 


*P 


bC 


&C 


P 




X> 


*P 


S 


a 


cS 


o3r 


^ 


h» 



© 



© 

C4-I 
O 
© 

s 



03 

4 

P 

B 

03 

Ha 



^' 



U6 



BtWA KAHTHA DIBECTOBY* 



LIST of States and estates under Agency jaanagatusofe 
showing annual revenue. 



Ko. 


Names of States, 


Annual income. 


Remarks. 


1 


Mandva... 


58,403 


* 


3 
4 


Vohra ... 
Vasai se/ada 
Sindbiapura .. 


9726 
7,963 
5,3:9 


Th* management 
y is due to miro- 
I rity of the Chi f^ 

1 


5 


Chbaliar.^ 


12,215 


l 

j 


6 Kanoda ... 


2,214 




7 


Litar Gotl da ... 


4 518 




8 


Nfcni Varnoli 


220 




9 


(part) 
Dodka 


3,567 




10 


Raika (part) ... 


2,596 




11 


Angadh ( part) ... 


3,200 





"♦iV'CJ* ■ 



KAMBS OF OFFICERS. 



14f 



LIST showing the names of Officers who were in charge of 

the Rewa Kantha Agency from 1826 to 1921 with 

the periods of their tenure as Political Agent. 



No 


Name of officer. 


From ' 
what datt 


lo what 
date. 


1 


•Mr. J. P. Willoughby 


1826 


1829 


2 llTMr. J. Williams 


1830 


31-l-o6 


3 


Mr. A. Malefc 


1-2-36 


14-10-39 


4 


Mr. A. Remington 


15-10-39 


17-8-44 


5 


Mr T.Ogilvy 


18-8-44 


4-7-45 


6 


JSir R. R Arbuihnot, Baronet ... 


5-7-45 


7-10-45 


7 


Mr. A. C. Stu*rr 


8-10-45 


10-5-46 


8 


Mr. G. B Seton Karr 


11-5-46 


21-10-46 




§ 


22-10-46 


2-3-49 


4 


Mr. A. Remington 


3-3-47 


2-4-47 




§ 


3-4-47 


6-6-47 


9 


Mr. S.Mansfield 


7-6-47 


28-12-47 


5 


Mr. T. Ogilvy 


•^9- 12-47 


6-2 -48 


9 


Mr. S. Mansfield ... 


7-2-48 


2 0-5- 4 a 




§ 


21-5-48 


1-6-48 


5 


Mr. T. Ocrilvy 


2-6-48 


13-4 49 


10 


Major L. Brown 


1 4-4-49 


14-10-49 




§ 


15-10-49 


18-11-49 




§Do 


19-11-49 


10-11-50 






11-11-50 


10-12-50 



*In addition to his own duties as 1st Assistant Resident in charge . 
Baroda upto 1826 and from 1826 as Political Agent, Rewa Kantha. 

Tfln 1829 the office of Political Agent was abolished and the super- 
vision c£ the States of Rewa Kantha was entrusted to an Assistant to 
the Political Commissioner, Guzarat. The office of Political Agent was 
X3-tsta,blished in 1842. 

Jin addition to his own duties as Resident, Baroda. 

^Charge with the Assistant Resident, Baroda, 



148 



KEWA KANT5A DIRECTORY. 



No. 


Name of Officer. 


From 
what dat> 


Tb what 
date. 


10 


1 Major L. Brown 


11-12-50 


16-7-51 




* 


17-7-51 


10-8-51 


11 


UMpjor G. Fulljatnes 


11-8-51 


14-9-53 






15-9-53 


18-11-53 


12 


Captain R. Wallace 


19-11-53 


15-2-55 




* 


16-2-55 


14-3-55 


12 


Captain R. Wallace ... 


15-3-55 


12-3-56 


13 


Lieutenant C. Buckle ... 


13-3-56 


13-4 56 


12 


Captain R Wallace 


14-4-96 


26-8-56 


13 


Captain C. Buckle 


26-8-56 


1-1-58 


12 


Major R. Wallace 


2-1-58 


2-8-59 


13 


Major C. Buckle 


3-8-59 


3-11-62 


14 


Captain G. Atkinson 


4-11-52 


19-2 63 


15 


jLt. Colonel J. T. B'irr ... 


20-2-63 


30-3-64 


16 


Captain L C. Button 


31-3-64 


25-4-65 


17 


Lt. Colonel G. W. Anderson 


26-4-65 


20-8-66 


18 


Major H. R. Hathway 


21-8-66 


25-11-66 


16 


Captain L. C. Barton 


26-11-66 


22—3-70 


19 


Captain W. A. Salmon 


23-3-70 


17-6 70 


16 


Major L. C. Barton 


18-6-70 


24-11 72 


20' 


Mr A. C. B>evey 


25-11-72 


22-12-72 


21 


Captain H. N. Reeves 


23 -12-7 t 


5_2-73 


22 


Captain I). Wocbhousa 


6-2-73 


2S— 2 73 


20 


Mr. A. C. Boevey 


1-3-73 


1-5-73 


21 


Captain H. N. Raeves 


2-5-73 


5-12—73 


16 


Colonel L C Barton 


6 12-73 


30-3-76 


22 


Major J W. Wateon 


31-3-76 


3—10 76 


23 


« oloncl W. U, Parr 


4-10 76 


4—10-76 


£2 


Major J. W. Watson 


5-10-76 


1 — \l-76 



•Charge with the Assistant Resident, Baroda. 

ISinchia's Panch Maha's handed over to the Political Agent, 
Jtewa Kantha, in 1853 for a period of 10 years. 

% Panch Mahals removed from the control of the Political Agent in 
1864 and placed under 1st Assistant Collector, Kaira. 



KAMK8. OF ^*K»RS. 



14** 




23 

23 
21 
24 

21 

25 

26 
25 
i6 
21 
26 

27 

27 

26 



28 
29 
28 
30 
28 
31 

32 
33 



Colonel W. C. Parr 

*Mr. Nandehankar Tuljashaokar ... 

C lonel W. C. Parr 

Major H. N. Reeves 

Mr G. H. D. Wilaoa ... 

Mr. J. B R IC hey 

Major H. N. Reeves 

*Mr. Nandshanker T. ... Z. 

Mr. H A. Acworch 

Mr. W. Woo., ward ... ."*. 

Mr. H. A. Ac worth 

Mr. W. Woodward 

Lb. Colonel H. N . Reeves 
ij Mr, W. Woodward 

Mr. W. A |(en ... Z Z 

Mr. G. F.M.Grant 

M r. W. A l!en 

fr. G. p M- Qr«nt 

Mr. W.Allen 

M r> w Woodward 

Mr. F. Beam ai » 

Mr. W. Allen 

Mr. J. R. S^ence 

Mr A. D. Younghusband 

Mr, J. R. Spence 

Mr. G. 0. W hi i, worth ... 

Mr. J. R. Spence ... 

Mr. H. E Winter 

Mr. W. T. Moriaon 

Mr. J. M. Campbell 

Mr. J- A. B»ines ... 



2-11-76 

4-12-76 
25 — 1-77 
23-7-77 
20-10-77 
30-1-7& 
16—2-78 
25-5-78 

6-6-78 
17-6-78 
20—5-79 
20-6-79 
10-11-79 
29-11-79 
11—4-80 
15—4-80 

8-5.81 

22 5-8 1 

31 -5-81 
18 6-81 
21 — 3-83 

5-4_83 
23—4-83 
17—8-84 

18 9 « 4 

7-9-35 

20-11-85 
11—5-86 
6-12-86 
23-12-86 

1—12-87 



3- 

24 

22 

19 

29 

15 

24- 

5- 

16- 

19 

19 

9— 

28 

10 

14 

7- 

21 

30 

17 

20 
4_ 

22 
16 
17 

6 
19 
10 

5 
22- 
30 

2 



-12-76 

-1-77 

-7-77 

-10-77 

-1-78 

-2-78 

-5-78 

6-78 

- 6-78 

—5-79 

—6-79 

11 79 
-11-79 
-4-80 
—4-80 
-5—81 
-5-81 
-5-81 
-6-81 
-3-83 

4—83 
-4-83 
-8-84 
-9-84 
-9-85 
11-85 
-5-86 

12 86 
12-86 
11-87 
-1-88 



* Held temporary charge. 

i A separate Political Agent for Rewa Kantha was abolished, and 
the charge o£ the States placed io 1880 un 1<>T» the Collector of Panch 
Mahals, which were raised to the rank oEa British District in 1876. 



m 



VKVtk KAMTHA. DtRtCTORT. 



No. 



Name of Officer. 



From 

what date 



To what 
date. 



32 
34 
32 
35 
34 
36 
32 
37 
38 



39 
38 
39 
40 
41 
40 
42 
40 
43 

44 

43 
45 
46 
47 
45 
48 
49 
50 

51 

52 
53 



Mr. 

» 
» 

ft 
M 

>? 

f 



>9 
l> 

Dr. 
Mr. 
Dr. 
Mr. 
Dr. 
Mr. 

»> 
»» 
i> 
»> 

IT 
>> 
!> 
»> 
!> 
)> 
>> 



J. M. Campbell 
G. M. Urquhart 
J. M. Campbell 
C. E. Frost ... 
G. M. UiquWb 
H. Woodward 
J. M. Campbell 
A. F. Wocdburn 
H. T. Ommanney 
E. Maconochie 

A. C. Lfgan 
E. Maconochie 
H. T. Ommanney 
E. Maconochie 

J. Pollen 

M. C. Gibb ... 
J. Pollen 

H. O. Quin ... 
J. Pollen 
W. Doderet 

H. D. Bendall 

B. C. Brown 
H. D. Kendall 
W. Dcderet ... 
H. D. Bendall 

C. N. Seddon 
B. B. Stewart 
H. D Bendall 
A. L. M.Wood 
P. B. Cadell 
G. Larniichtel 

F. G. Pratt ... 



„ P. J. Mead , 
„ B. C. Brt^o 



3-1-88 

10-11-88 

2-12-88 

5—3-89 
15-5 89 
25-6-89 
22-12-89 
' 9 - 5-90 
22-11-9" 
11—8-92 
26—8-92 
15—9-92 
26-10 92 
26—7-93 
21-9-93 

2—3-95 
10— 6 95 
•26—7-95 
24—9-95 

2-6-96 

4 11-98 
9-11-98 

28—1-99 
29—1-99 
18- 5-99 
H_7_99 
18—9 i>9 
18-9-00 
18-10-00 
28—4-01 

5 12 01 



92 
92 
92 
93 

93 



».< 



9-2—4 
19—9—5 
12-11 5 



9-11-88 
1-12-88 
4—3-89 
14-5-89 
24—6-89 
21-12-89 
18—5-90 
21-11-90 
10—8 92 
25--8 
14-9 
25 10- 
25-7 
20 9 
1—3-95 
9_6-95 
25—7-95 
23 — 9-95 
1_6-9S 
8-11-98 
811-98 
27-1-99 
28-1-99 
17-5-99 
10-7-99 
17-9.99 
17-9-0O 
17-J00O 
27-4-01 
4 12.01 
8-2-4 

18 9-05 

11- 11- 05 

6 12-09 






VAME& or 



**1 



No. 


Name of Officer. 


From 
wbat datt 


T 1Cowhat> 
date. 


54 


Mr. A. Wood 


6 12-9 1 81-5-10 


55 


„ B. B Ewbank ... ... 


L6 10 


1-7-10 


56 


„ H. L. Painter ... 


2 MO 


19-1210 


57 


„ R.B. Ewbank 


2012-10 


22-12 10 


58 


, J. Ghosal ... ... •.. 


23-12-10 


22-10-12 


%j %) 


„ H. 3. Claytoa 


23-10-12 


16-3-13 


€0 


,, C W. M. Hudson *.. 


17-3-13 


13-8 13 


61 


„ H. V. Braham 


148-13 


19-9-13 


62 


,, C. W. M. Hudson 


20-9- 13 




63 


„ C. W. M. Hudson 


1-4 1915 


5-2-1916 


84 


„ W; W. Smart 


6-2 1916 


20-2-1919 


65 


„ H. B. Clayton ... 


21-21919 


14-12-19, 


66 


„ A. Master 


15-12-19 


5-2 1920 


-67 


t> J. Abbott ... 


6-2-1920 


6-8 1920 


68 


i, C, A. Beyts ... ... 


7-8-1920 


31-8-1921 


69 


99 A, Jti», XJ&lai »•» ... ••• 


1-9-1921 


12-10-21 


70 


f9 C. A. Beyts ... 


13-10-21 


continues 



*^ 2 MfWA KiKTBA D1BE0T0RT. 

LIST of the names of Chiefs who ruled their States 
since 1820 shotting the period of their reign. 



Name of Chief. 


From 

A. D. 


To 

A. D. 




RAJP1PLA. ( 


| 


1. Veriealji ... 


1821 


1867 




2. Gambhireinbji 


1868 


1896 




3. Sir Chhatraeinbji K. 0. I. E. 


1897 


1915 


' 


4. Captain Vijaysinbji (Present 

Ruler) 


1915 






CHHOTA UDEPUR. 








Prithi Rojji 


1819 


1822 




Gumansinhji 


1822 


1851 




JitBinbji 


1851 


1881 




Motisinbji ... 


1881 


1895 


*Fatebsinbji (Present Ruler) ... 


1895 






BARIA. 








Prithirajaingji 


1820 


1864 




♦Mansinhji ... ... 


1864 


1908 




Banjitsinhji (Present ruler) ... 


1908 







♦During Lis minority ihe State was administered under Govern* 
meat supervision. 



¥AMES OF CHIEFS. 




XOi 


Names of Chiefs. 


From 

A.. D. 


To 

A. D. 




LUNAVADA. 








F tehsinhjt 
Dnlpatsinhji 
Dalelsiobji ... 


1808 
1849 

1852 


184:> 

Regent y. 
1867 




*3ir Wakhatsinhji K. C. I. E 
BALASINOR. 


1867 




Present 
Ruler. 


Aladkhanji ... ... 


1820 


1822 




JalalkbaDJi 


1822 


1861 




Jorawarkhanji 


1881 


1882 




Manovarkhanji ... 


1882 


1889 




*Jamiatkha»ji (Present Ruler) ... 


1889 






SUNTH RAMPUR. 








KaliaDsiog ... 


1820 


1835 




Bhawaniaing ... 


1836 


1872 




Pratapsing ... 


1873 


1896 




*Jorawarsing (Present Ruler) ... 


1896 






KADANA. 


I 






Bhimeinhji ... ... ... 


1794 


1838 




Parwateinhji ... 


1888 


1889 




Chhatraaalji... ... ... 


1889 


Now ruling the 
Stftte. 



* During his minority; tbe State was admini t:red tinder Govern- 
ment supervision. 
20 



154 



BEWA KAMTHA DIRECTORY. 



Names of Chiefs. 


Prom 
A. d. 


To 

A. D. 


- 


BHADARWA. 




\ 


: 


Partapsinbji 


1783 


1825 


i 


Jalamsinbji ... ... 


1826 


1842 




Sardarsinhji 


1842 


1879 




Ades'nhji ... 


1880 


1888 




Pattsinhji ... 


1888 


1911 




Amarsingji (Present Ruler) ... 


1912 






SANJELI. 








Jagttsinl ji ... 


1814 


1857 




Pratapsinhji 


1858 


1901 




^Pushpasinbji (Present Ruler) ... 


1902 






JAMBUGHODA. 








Jagatsinhji Amarsingji 


1820 


1870 




Dipsingji Jagatsingji... 


1870 


1911 




Gambhirsingji Dipsingji 


1911 


1918 




Raujiteingji (Present Ruler) ... 


1918 







* During his minority the state was administered under (xwrccft— 
ment supervision. 



«*>♦»$€««* 




SECTION II. 



Political Reforms 

and 

General Information, 




SECTION II 



POLITICAL REFORMS IN THE GOVERNMENT OP 
THE INDIAN EMPIRE. 



In August 1917 an announcement was made by tha 
Secretary of State for India, with the fall concurrence of 
the Cabinet, to the effect fl that the policy of His M*gosty'» 
•• Government, with which the Government of India were ia 
41 complete accord, is that of tie increasing association of 
" Indians in every branch of the Adminisoration, and ths 
u gradual developarnent of self governing institutions with & 
" view to the progressive realization of responsible Govern* 
4< rnent in India as an integral part of the B'itiah Enpire. I 
44 would add that progress in this policy can only ba 
" achieved by successive stages. The British Government* 
u and the Government of India* on whom the responsibility 
u lies for the welfare and advance nent of Iniian peoples, must* 
" be judges of the time and measure of oaoh advance, and 
" they must be guided by the co-opsration received from thoss 
4< upon whom new opportunities will thus be conferred, and 
u by the extent to which it is found that oonfilence ctn b^ 
" reposed in their sense of re3p msibility." To give e&3ct to 
this policy the Secretary of State for India, with a small 
delegation, visited the country and in conjunction with th» 
Viceroy toured through the principal centres, aid met* 
people of every shade of opinion. The result of this inquiry 
Was embodied in a blue-book called the M>abao'u-G»a*lm*fofti 
Report. In that report a scheme was drawn up for th^ 
liberalisation of the constitution of the Government of India and 
for the immediate introduction of a measure of responsibly 
Government in the provinces through the introduction of 
what is called the dyarchy. The essentials of this schema 
may be summarised thus: — 



158 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTO*** 

1. There should be, as far as possible, complete popular 
control in local bodies, and the largest possible independence 
for them of outside control 

2. The provinces are the domain in which the earliest 
•teps towards the progressive realization of responsible 
Government should be taken. Some measure of responsibility 
should bd given at once, and the aim is to give complete 
responsibility as soon as conditions admit. This involves ate 
cnce giving the provinces the largest measure of indepandencs, 
legisla'ive, administrative and financial, of the Government of 
India, which is compatible with the due discharge by the 
latter of its own responsibilities. 

3. The Government of India must remain wholly 
responsible to Parliament, and saving such responsibility its 
Authority in essential matters must remain indisputable, 
pending experience of the effect of tha changes now to be 
introduced in the province?. In the meantime the Indian 
^Legislative Council should b9 enlarged and made more 
representative and its oppDrtunities of influencing Government 
increased. 

4. In proportion as the foregoing changes take effect, 
the control of Parliament and the Secretary of State over 
the Government of India and Provincial Governments must 
be relaxed. 

These proposals were published in 1918 and subjected 
to criticism. They were afterwards examined by a Joint 
Committee of Parliament sitting under the chairmanship of 
Lord Selborne and embodied in a Bill which became law a*> 
the end of 1919 in the form of an amendment of th* 
instrument of Government of India Act-. The final detail* 
*nre worked ou!j in 1920 and the first elections under the 
new constitutions were held towards the end of the ysar. 
The new machinery of Government came everywhere into 
operation early in 1921. The new constitution leaves the 
frame-work of the executive Government little changed, it 



POLITICAL REFORMS* 15* 

continues to be in the form of a Governor-General in Council, 
the Council consisting of the heads of the great adminis- 
trative departments. The principal changes made consist of 
increasing the Indian Members from one to three and of [ 
removing ail the constitutional barriers on the fall disoretioa 
of the King in selecting Members for these posts. 



PERSONNEL OF THE GOVERNMENT. 

The Governor Ganeral and the M Executive M Members 
cf his Council are appointed by the Grown. No limit of 
time is specified to their tenure of office, but custom has 
fixed it at five years. There are seven Executive Members 
of Council. These members hold respectively th* portfolios 
of Land Revenue and Agriculture, the Home, the Finance 
?and the Education Departments. The Law Member has 
the ch irge of the Legislative Department, and a Member with 
English official experience has charge of the Commerce and 
Industry Department. The Vicsroy acts as his own Member 
in charge of foreign affair?. Railways are administered by 
a Board of three members, whose chairman has the status o£ 
a Secretary, and are under the general control of Commerce 
and Industry Department. The Commaoder-in-Ghief may 
also be, and in practica always is, an ' extraordinary ** 
Member of the Council. He hoi Js charge of the Axmy 
Department. The Governors of Madras, Bombay and Bengal 
become •• extraordinary " members, if the Council meets* 
within their Presidencies. The Council may assemble afc 
any place in India, which the Governor General appoints i 
in practice it meets only in Dalhi and Simla. 




1<8> BEWA, KANTHA DlflKCTOftT. 

BUSINESS PROCEDURE. 

In regard to his own Department each Member of* 
"CJouncil is largely in the position of a Minister of State, 
and has the final voice in ordinary departmental matters, 
But any question of special importance, and any matter in 
which it is proposed to over-rule the views of a Local 
Government, must ordinarily be referred to the Viceroy. 
Any matter originating in one department which also affjcbs 
another must be referred to the latter, and ia the eveno of 
the Departments not being able to agree, the case is referred 
to the Viceroy. The Members of the Council meet periodically, 
as a cabinet, ordinarily once a week to discuss question* 
which the Viceroy desires to pat before them, or which a 
member who ha3 been over-ruled by the Viceroy has asked 
to be referred to Council, If there is a difference of opinion 
ia the Council, the decision o£ the majority ordinarily 
prevails, but the Viceroy can overrule a majority if he 
considers that the matter is of such grave importaac3 as to 
justify such a step. Each departmental office is in the 
subordinate charge of a Secretary, whose position corresponds 
very much to thet of a permanent Under-Secretary of State 
in the United Kingdom, but with these differences that ths 
Secretary is present at council meetings, that he attends 
on the Viceroy, usually once a week an 1 discusses with him 
all matters of importance arising in his Department, that 
he has the right of bringing to the Viceroy's special notice 
any caSQ in which he considers that the Viceroys concurrence 
should be obtained to action proposed by the Djpartmental 
member of Council, and that his tenure of office is usually 
limited to three years. The Secretaries have under them 
Deputy, Under and Assistant Secretaries, together wish the 
ordinary clerical establshments. The Secretaries and Under 
Secretaries are usually members of the Indian Civil Service. 
The Government of Indialhas na Oivil Service of its own, 
as distinct from that of the Provincial Governments, and 



cfficers serving under the Government of India hte borrowed 
from the Province?. 



THE IMPERIAL LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. 

The constitution of the Executive Council of the 
Government of India has been sketched. Tbe Legislature is 
bicameral consisting of the Council of SUte and the 
^Legislative Assembly. Th9 first step was taken in 1881, 
when the Indian Councils Act provided that for the better 
exercise of making law3 and regulations vested in the Govern 3r 
General-in-Council, he should nominate lt Additional " Mem- 
bers for the purpose of legislation only. Tae Additional 
Members were appointed for two years and joined the Council 
when it met for Legislative purposes. The maximum number 
of members fixed by the Act was twelve, of whom not less 
thin one half were to be non-officials ( holding no office 
under the Government), and in practice most oE the non- 
officials were natives of India. Similar Legislative Councils 
were constituted in some of the Provinces, but the growth 
of these bodies will be considered, when we § me to deal 
with the provincial administrations. 



THE ACT OF 1892. 

In 1892 important additions were made both to the 
constitution and the powers of the Legislative Council The 
Dumber of Additional Members was raised to sixteen, and 
the representative principle was introduced. Whilst the 
method of appointment was, as before, nomination by the 
Governor General, a certain number of nominations were 
made on the recommendation of specified persons, bodies and 
associations, and in practice these recommendations were 
siever refused. Of the sixteen Additional Members, six were 
usually officials and ten non-officials. Four of the non- 
cffioials were nominated on the recommendations of non- 
21 



1$2 MWA KAflTHA DIBECTORT. 

official members of the Provincial Legislative Council, the 
fifth was recommended by the Calcutta Chamber of Commerce, 
and the remaining five were chos n by the Governor General 
either with a special view to the ^legislative business 
transacted, or to secure the due representation of all classes. 
Tbe Council was also empowered to discuss the Budget and 
to ask questions on matters of public interest. 



MORLEY-MINTO REFORMS. 

The Imperial Legislative Council took its present shape 
under what is commonly called the Morley-Minto reform 
echeme of 1909, and was embodied in the Indian Councils Act 
of that year. Two principles ran through 'the schema, 
(1) to secure the fair representation of all the varied interests 
in the country, and (2) to give the Council a real influence 
in determining the character of the administration. Tne 
Imperial Legislative Council as then constituted consisted 
of sixty Additional Members, of whom thirty-five were 
nominated by the Governor-General and twenty five were 
elected by specified electorates. Of the nominated members 
not more than twenty-eight might bo officials, and three 
other i, who must not be officials, were nominated by the 
Mahometans of the Punjab, the land holders of the Punjab, 
and the Indian commercial community respectively. Tue 
remaining four seats were at the Governor-Gen jral'd disojsa! 
to secure experts on sp&i&l subject.9 or r-*pre83utative3 of 
minor interests. Ol the twenty five elected immoera, eleven 
were selected by mn-oflfoial me Hoars of the Provincial 
Legislative Councils, two by eic'a of the foac largest 
provinces, and one by each of the ta^ea oth3r proviasis. 
A twelfth Wis elected by the District and L)3il 
Boards uf the Central Provinces, as that ad.aiaisoratioa had 
*io Legislative Council. Sis oaeuao3r3 ware elected by elec- 
torates of land owners in sis Proviuoea, five by the M*ho» 



POLITICAL BEPORM9. MX 

medaa community in each of the Provinces and tw> by the 

Chambers of CMnmerca in Cileubta and Bombay. The 

Govemor-Ganeral in Council had the exceptional p)*er of 

excluding a candidate whose reputation and antecedents 

were such that his election would be contrary to tha piblic 

interest. \u oath or affirmation of lovalty to tha C*own 

was required of every member before he took his saat. 

Members held offica for three years, and each triennium there 

was a general election for the Council. 



THE REFORM ACT OF 1919. 

It has been explained that the Reform A 3b of 191£> 
left the structure of the execubive of the Government of 
India little affected. Great changes were made bi-cameral 
in character. A second Chamber, called tha C)uacil of 
State, was created. The Council of State consists of thirty- 
three elected members and twenty seven membars nominated 
by the Governor-General, of whom not more than twenty 
may be officials and one shall be a person nominated as the 
result of an election held in Bera*\ The elected numbers of 
the Council are chosen by direct election on a higa tranchisa 
for large constituencies. The strength of tha Legislative 
Council, to ba known henceforth as the Legislative Assembly, is 
raised to a total of one hundred and forty menhirs. Toe number 
of noa-alected members is forty, of whom twenty six are 
official membars. Tha number of elected members is one 
hundred, all chosen by direct election. The powers of the 
Legislature, as well as the special powars reserved by the 
Governor General for the discharge of his responsibilities, 
are fully set out in the Act, of which the essential clauses 
are given below : — 

21. (1) Every Council of State shall continue for 
five years and every Legislative Assembly for three years 
from its first meeting. 



l^j BEWA f A|?THA DJiqSC$QSY. 

Pjpvided that— 

(a) Either chamber of the Legislature may be sooner 
dissolved by the Governor General and 

(b) any such period may be extended by the Governs 
General, if in special circumstances, he so thinks fit, and 

(c) After the dissolution 'of either chamber, the 
Governor General shall appoint a date not more than six 
months, or with the sanction of the Secretary of State, aofc-" 
more thnn nine months aftar the date of dissolution, for the 
next session of that Chamber. 

22. (1) An official shall not be qualified for election* 
as a member of either chamber of the Indian Legislature,, 
and if any non-qualified member of either chamber accepts 
office in the sarvice of the Crown in India, his seat in that 
Chamber shall become vacant. 

(4) Every member of the Governor General's Esecutivtf 
Council shall ba nominated as a member of one Chamber 
of the Indian legislature, and shall have the right of 
attending in and addressing- t&e other chamber, but shall 
not be a member of bot h chambers. 

(24) (3) If any Bill which has bsan p*33ei by one 
is not, within six months afoer tha pissigi of «ihd Bill by 
that chamber, passed by the other chain idr either without 
amendments or with such amendmants as may b.> agreed fee* 
by the two chambers, the Governor G<*n<*r*l miy in his 
discretion refer the matter for decision to a joint* sibling of 
both chambers, provided that standing ordcus mide unlet 
this section may provide for meetings of m unbars of h>tii 
Chambers appointed fjr this purp^sa, in oclac to discis* 
any difference of opinion which h s arisen batw^en the fcwu, 
chambers, 

(4) Without prejudice to the powers of the Governor 
General under secti n sixty-eight o£ tha principtl &C&, the 



POLITICAL REFORMS. 1(& 

Gavernor- General miy, where a Bill has been pis3ed by 
both Chambers of Indian legislature, return the Bill tor re- 
consideration by either Chamber. 

(7). Subject to the rales and standing orders 
affecting the chamber, there shall be freedom of speeoh ia 
both Chambers o£ the Indian Legislature. N> p3fs*n shall 
be liable to any procaedinor in any C>urt by reason of hist 
speech or vote in either Chamber or by reason of anything 
contained in any official report of the proceedings of either 
Chamber. 

(25) INDIAN BUDGEr. 

(1) The estimated annual expenditure and revenue of 
the Governor-General in Coancil shall be laid in the fora* 
of a statement before both Chambers of the Indian legi- 
slature in each year. 

(2) No proposals for the appropriation of any reventtfr 
or moneys for any purpose shall ba made excspo on the 
recommendation of the Governor-General. 

(3) The proposals of the Governor- General in Council 
for the appropriation of revenue or moneys relating to th^ 
following h?ads of expenditure shall not be submitted to ths> 
vote of the Legislative Assembly, n->r stnll they be open 
to discussion by either chamber at the time wrieu the annual 
statement is under onsideration, unles3 the Governor 
Gsneral otherwise directs.— 

(i) interest and sinking fund charges on bans ; and 

(ii) expenditure of which the amount is prescribed by 
or under any law, and 

(iii) Salaries and pensions of persons appointed by or 
with the approval of His Majesty or by the Secretary of 
State in Council and 

(iv) Salaries oE Chief Commissioners and Judicial 
Commissioners; and 



ICG BXWA KAVTHii D1RKCT0BY. 

(v) Expenditure classified by the order of the 
Governor General in Council as 

(a) Ecclesiastical, (b) Political, (c) Defence. 

(4) If any question arises whether any proposed 
appropriation of revenue or moneys does or does not relate 
to the above heads, the decision of the Governor General on 
the question shall be final. 

(5) The proposals of the Governor General in Council 
for the appropriation of revenue or moneys relating to heads 
Of expenditure not specified in the above heads shall be 
submitted to the vote of the Legislative Assembly in the 
form of demands for grants. 

(6) The Legislative Assembly may assent or refuse its 
assent to any demand or may reduce the amount referred 
to in any demand by the reduction of the whole grant. 

(7) The demands as voted by the Legislative Assembly 
shall be submitted to the Governor General in Council, who 
fchall, if he declares that he is satisfied that any demand 
which has been refused by the Legislative Assembly i$ 
essential to the discharge of his responsibilities, act as if it 
had been assented to, notwithstanding the withholding of 
such assent or the reduction of the amount therein referred 
to, by the Legislative Assembly. 

(8) Notwithstanding anything in this seotioa the 
Governor Ganeral shall have power, in cases of emergency, 
to authorise such expenditure as may in hi3 opinion be 
necessary for the safety or tranquility of British India or 
Uny part thereof. 

f (26) EMERGENCY POWERS:-(l) Where either Chamber 
cf the Indian Legislature refuses leave *to introduce or fails 
to pass in a form recommended by the Governor General 
any Bill, the Governor General may oartify that the passage 



POLITICAL RBEORMS. 16? 

of the Bill is essential for the safety, tranquility or interest 
of British India or any part thereof and thereupon, 

(a) If the Bill has already been passed by the other 
Chamber, the Bill shall, on signature by the Governor 
General, notwithstanding that it has n^t been consented to 
by both Chambers, forthwith become an Acb of the Indiaa 
Legislature in the form of the Bill as originally introduced 
or proposed to be introduced in the Indian Legislature or 
(as the ease may be) in the form recommended by tha 
Governor General ; and 

(b) If the Bill has not already bean so passed, thfr 
Bill shall be laid before the other Chamber, and if consented 
to by that Chamber in the form recommended by ths 
Governor General, shall become an Aet as aforesaid on tha 
signification of the Governor General's asseit, or if not so 
consented to, shall, on signature by the Governor General, 
become aa Act as aforesaid. 

(c) Every such Act shall be expressed to be made* 
by the Govern >r General and shall, as soon as practicable 
after being mtdo, be laid before both houses of Parliament^ 
and shall not have effect; until it has receive 1 His Majesty's 
assent, and shall not be presented for His Majesty's assent* 
until copies thereof have been laid before each H:>use of 
Parliament for not less than eight, days, on which thafr 
House has sat, and upon the signification of such assent* 
by His iv'ajgsty in Council and the notification thereof by 
the Governor General, the Acb shall have the same force and 
effect as an Act passed by the Indian Legislature and duly 
assented to. Provided that, where in the opinion of tha 
Governor General a state of emergency exists waieh j istifiea 
such action, the Governor General may direct th<\t any such 
Ace shall come into operation forthwith and thereupon th* 
Acb shall have such force and effect as afiresaii* subject),, 
however, to disallowance by His Majesty ia Council 



168 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

(27) SUPPLEMENTAL PROVISONS. 

(1) In addition to the measures referred to in subsection 
{2) of section sixty seven of the principal Act, as 
requiring the previous sanction of the Governor General, it 
fihall not be lawful without such previous sanction to introduce 
at any meeting of either Chamber cf the Indian Legislature 
any measure, 

(a) regulating any provincial subject, or any part of 
provincial subject, which has not been declared by rulea 
tinder the principal Act to be subject to legislation by the 
Indian legislature, 

(b) repealing or amending any Act of a local Legisla* 
Cure; 

(c) repealing or amending any Act or Ordinance made 
hy the Governor General. 

(2) Where in either Chamber of the Indian Legislature 
any Bill has been introduced or is proposed to be introduced, 
or any amerdment to a Bill is moved or proposed to be 
moved, the Governor General may certify that the Bill or 
any clause of it, or the amendment affects the safety or 
tranquility of British India or any part thereof, and may 
direct that no proceedings, or that no further proceedings, 
<©hall be taken by the Chamber in relation to the Bill, clause 
or amendment, and effect shall be given to such direction. 



THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS. 

The object of the Reforms is the progressive realisation 
cf responsible Government, Responsible Government implies 
two conditions, first, that the members cf the executive 
Government should be responsible to their constituents, and 
secondly that these constituents should exercise their power 
through the 8gency of their representatives in the Assembly. 
These two conditions entail that there exist constituences 
based on a franchise broad enough to represent the interests 
of the population generally, and capable of selecting 
reprepentat'ves intelligently; secondly that there is recognised 
and constitutional practice that the executive Government 
cannot retain office unless it commands the support of a 
majority in the Assembly. In Inaia, these conditions are 
not realized. There must be a period of political education 
which can only be achieved through the gradually expanding 
exercise of responsibility. Practical considerations make the 
immediate handing over of complete responsibility impossible. 
Accordingly the principle is adopted of transferring responsibility 
for certain functions of Government, while reserving control 
ever others, while at the same time establishing substantial 
provincial autonomy. 



PROVINCIAL AUTONOMY. 

Since substantial provincial autonomy is to ba a reality, 
the provinces must not be dependant on the Indian Govern- 
ment for the means of provincial development. The general 
idea, of the scheme, on this matter, h that the estimate 
should first be made of tha scale of expenditure required for 
the upkeep and development of the services, which clearly 
appertain to the Indian sphere, that recources with which 
to meet this expenditure should ba secured to the Indian 
Government, and that all other revenues should then be 
banded over to the Provincial Governments, which will 
thenceforth be held wholly responsible for the development 
22 



• 170 MWA KANTHA IftBBCM&S. 

of all provincial services. The principal changes in detail 
is the abolition of divided heads of revenue. Indian and 
Provincial heads of revenue are retained at present; bat te 
the former income tax and general stamps ate to be added 
and to the latter land revenue, irrigation, excise and judicial 
stamps. It follows that expenditure of famine relief and 
the protective irrigation works will fall upon the provinces, 
though in the matter of famine relief the Indian Government* 
could nev^r wloly renounce responsibility in the case of 
any failure on the part "of the provinces. This arrangement 
leaves tie Government of India with a large deficit- la 
order to supplement this, the contribution from each province 
to the Government cf India is assessed and fix 3d on the 
following basis : — 

In the financial year 1921*22 contributions shall be paid 
to the Governor General in Goaneil by the local Governments 
mentioned below according to the following scale : — 

Name of Province. Contribution (in lakhs of Ra) 

Madras ••• ••• — ••• 348 

Bombay ... ••• ••• — 58 

Bengal ••• ••• ••• — $$ 

United Provinces ... ~. ... 240 

Punjab *•• ••• ••• ••• I^*> 

Burma ... ••. ••• ••• 64 

CeLtral Provinces and Barar ... ••• 22 

A^satn ••• ••• •** ••• 1* 

From the financial year 1922-23 onwards a total 
contribution of 983 lakhs, or such smaller sum as may be 
determined by the Governor General in Council, shall be 
paid to the Governor General in Council by the local 
Governments mentioned in the preceding rule. When for 
any yesr tne Governor General in Council determines as the 
amount of the contribution a smaller sum than that pay* 
able for the pie ceding year, a reduction shall be made in 
contributions of those local Go/ernments only, whose iant 



POLITICAL OTFORMS. Ill 

previous annual contribution exceeds the proportion specified 
below of the smaller sum so determined as the total contri- 
bution, and any reduction so made shall be proportionate to 
such excess. 

Madras ... ... ... 17— 90ths» 

Bombay ... ... ... 13— 90ths. 

Bengal ... ... ... 19— 90tha. 

United Provinces... ... ... 18 — 90ths. 

Punjab ... ... ... 9— 90ths. 

Burma ... ... ... 6£— 90th*. 

Central Provinces and Berars .•. 5 — 90 th*. 

Assam ... ... ... ... 2£— 90ths. 

In cases of emergency the lo?al Government of any 
province may be required by the Govemor-Ganeral in Council, 
with the sanction of, and subject to the conditions appro vel 
by the Secretary of State, to pay tD the Governor Ganertf 
in Council a contribution for any Bnanoial year in excess of 
the amount required by the preceding rules in the case of 
that year. 

THE SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT. 

In all the Provinoes there is collective administration* 
the system of a Governor in Council. At the head of the 
Executive is the Governor, with an Executive Council 
nominated by the Governor. Associated with the Executive 
Council, as part of the Government, are one or more Minister* 
chosen by the Governor from among the elected member* 
of the Legislative Council and boldiug offbe for the life (if 
the Council. The plan is adopted of making a division of th« 
functions of the Provincial Government, between those whicln 
may be made over to the popular control and those which for 
the present must remain in official hands. These functiaai 
are calied ''transferred and reserved" respectively. In ttta 
Provincial Executive the Governor in Council has charge of 
the reserved subjects. This is one part of the Executif*. 



17$ BEWA "KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

The other parlrof the Executive consists of ths Governor 
and Minister or Ministers and deals with the ^transferred" 
subjects. As a general rule the Executive deliberate as a 
whole, although there may be occasions upon which the 
Governor prefers to discuss a particular question with that 
part of the Government directly responsible. The decision 
upon a transferred subject and on ha supply for it in the 
provincial Budget is taken after general discussion by the 
Governor and his Ministers; the decision on a reserved subject 
is tak$n after smaller discussion by the Governor and the 
Members of his Executive Council, 

The Ministers hold office not at the will of the Legis- 
lature, but at the will of their constituents. The salary, 
while they are in office, is secured to them, and is not at 
the pleasure of the Legislative Council. They together with 
the Governor form the administration for the transferred 
subjest*. It is not intended that the Governor should from* 
the; first be bound to accept the decision of his Ministers, 
because he will himself be generally responsible for the 
administration. But it is also not intended that he should 
be in a position to refuse assent at discretion to all his 
Ministers' proposals. The intention is rather that the 
Ministers should avail themselves of the Governor's trained 
advice upon administrative questions, while he en his part is. 
willing to meet their wishes to the furthest possible extent, 

in cases where he realises they have the support of popular 
opinion. 

The keynote of the scheme is the establishment of 
effective provincial autonomy and the introduction of respon- 
sible government in the Provinces. This connotes a sharp 
division between the Central Government and the Provinces, 
and the division of the Provincial administration into two 
parts, the reserved subjects, namely those reserved to the 
Governor and his Executive Council, and the transferred 
subject?, or the subjects transferred under certain conditions 
to Ministers chosen from the Legislativa Council. 



POLITICAL BSTOBMg, 17& 

IP BODSE OF PPCES. 

The report on Indian const itational reforms by Mr. 
Montagu and Lord Chelmsford stated that it was desired 
to call into existence a permanent consultative body which 
oould replace the Conference of Princes which had periodically 
met at the invitation of the Viceroy, After pointing out 
the need for regular meetings of the Council, the Report 
said : — " We contemplate that the Viceroy should be President 
and should as a rule preside, but that in his absence one of 

the Princes shoufd be chairman. The rules of business 
"Would be framed by the Viceroy after consultation with the 

Princes, who might from time to tim6 suggest modifications 

in the rules." 

Ito was further suggested in the joint report that the 
Council of the Princes should be invited annually to appoint* 
a small Staining Committee, to which the Viceroy or the 
Political Dapnrlmant might refer decisions affacting the Native 
States, particularly questions dealing with custom or usage. 
J tie joint report also made recommendations for the appoint- 
ment of commissions to inquire into disputes in which 
Native States might be concerned, and into cases of miscon- 
duct, and for arranging for joint deliberation on matters of 
coma on interest between the Council of State and the ' 
Council of Princes. 

At the end of January 1919 a Conference of the Ruling 
Princes was held at Delhi to consider this scheme. The 
subjects which gave rise to the longest discussion was tb» 



174 BKWA KAKTHA DIBKCTOBT. 

proposal in the Reform scheme to divide the Native States 
into two categories, those possessing *' fall powers " of internal 
government and those not ha?ing sooh powers; some of the 
prinoes held that membership of the Council of Princes 
should be limited to the rulers enjoying full power 3, whilst 
others considered that some measure of representation ought 
to be given to the smaller States, and the Conference came 
to no agreement on the matter. The proposal to institute 
a Council of Princes received, however, general support, and 
it was suggested that the new House should be called the 
Narendra Mandal (House of Princes ). 

This Chamber of Princes was formally inaugurated by 
H. R. H. the Duke of Connaught in February 1921 at 
Delhi. The proceedings of the ceremony and the rules of 
business of the Chamber will be found in the succeeding 
pages of this volume. 

In the Rewa Kantha Agency, the Princes of ths 1st 
and 2nd Classes are all Members of this Chamber, and the 
Thakor of Kadana has been specially elected as Member by 
the smaller States of the Northern Part of the Bombay 
Presidency. 




The New Regime n 



RCTXAL INSTRUCTIONS. 

TO THE GOVERNORS OF PROVINCES. 

December 17th, 1920. 

George R. I. — Instructions to the Governor or acting 
Governor for the time being of the Presidency or Province of 

-. Whereas by the Government of India Act 

provision has been made for the general development of 
self governing institutions in British India vyith a view to 
the progressive raalisation of responsible Government ia 
that country, as an integral part of our Empire. 

And whereas it is our Will and Pleasure that in the 
execution of the office of the Governor over the Presidency or 

the Province of you shall further the purposes of the said 

Act to the end that the institutions and methods of 
Government therein provided shall be laid upon the best and 
surest foundations, that the people of the said Presidency or 
Province shall acquire such . habits of political action, and 
respect such conventions as will best and soonest fit theai 
for self-Government, and that our authority and the authority 
of: the Governor General in Council shall be duly maintained. 

Now, therefore, we do hereby direct and enjoin you and 
declare our Will and Pleasure to be as follows : — 

1. You shall do all that lies in your power to main- 
tain those standards of good administration, to encourage 
religious toleration, co-operation and goodwill among all 
classes and creeds, to ensure the probity of public finance 
and the solvency of the Presidency or Province, and to 
programme all measures making for the moral, social and 
industrial welfare of the people and tending to fib ail classes 
of the population without distinction to take their due share 
in the public life and government of tlje country. 



176 BEWA KAtfTHA BIBBCTOBY. 

2. You should bear in mind that it ia necessary and 
expedient that those now and hereafter to be franohised 
shall appreciate the duties, responsibilities and advantages 
which spring from the privilege of enfranchisement; that is 
to say, that those who exercise the power henceforward 
entrusted to them of returning representatives to the 
Legislative Council being enabled to perceive the effects of 
their choice of a representative and that those who are 
returned to the Council, being enabled to perceive the effects 
of their votes given therein, shall come to look for the redress 
of their grievances and the improvement of their condition 
to the working of representative institutions. 

DUTY OF THE MINISTERS. 

3. Inasmuch as certain matters have been reserved 
for the administration, according to law, of the Governor in 
Council in respect of which the authority of our Governor 
General in Council shall remain unimpaired, while certain 
other matters have been transferred to the administration 
of the Governor acting with a Minister, it will be for you 
so to regulate the business of the Government of the Presidency 
or Province that so far as may be possible, the responsibility 
for each of these matters may be kept clear and distinct. 

4. Nevertheless you shall enforce the habit of joint 
deliberation between yourself, your Councillors and your 
Ministers in order that the experience of your official 
advisers may be at the disposal of your Ministers, and that 
the knowledge of your Ministers as to the wishes of the 

■f people may be at the disposal of your Councillors. 

5. You shall assist Ministers by all the means in 
your power in the administration of the transferred subjects 
and advise them in regard to their relations with the 
Legislative Council. 

In considering a Minister's advice and deciding whether 
or not there is sufficient cause in any case to dissent from 



POLITICAL BEEORM9. 



itr 



his opinion, you shall have due rega r d to his relations with 
the Legislative Council and to the wishes of the people of the 
Presidency or Province, as expressed by their representatives 
therein. 

SPECIAL CHANGES. 

But in addition to the general responsibilities with 
which you are, whether by statute or under thi3 instrument, 
charged, We do further hereby specially require and charge 
you ;— 

(1) To see that whatsoever measures in your opinion 
necessary for maintaining safety and tranquility in all parts 
of your Presidency or Province and for prevanting occasions 
of religious or racial conflict are duly taken and that all- 
orders issued by our Secretary cf State or by our Governor 
General in Council on our behalf, to whatever matters 
relating, are duly complied with. 

(2) To take care that due provision shall be made for 
the advancement and social welfare of those classes amongst 
the people committed to your ohargs, who, whether on 
account of the smallness of their number, or their lack of~ 
educational or material advantages or from any other cause, 
specially rely upon our protection and cannot as yet fully 
rely for their welfare upcn joint political action, and that 
such classes shall not suffer or have cause to fear neglect or 
oppression. 

(3) To sea that no order of your Government and no 
act of your Legislative Council shall b* 3 so framed that any 
cne of the diverse interests of, or arising trom race, religion, 
education, social condition, wealth or any other circumstance, 
may receive unfair advantage or may unfairly be deprived 
of privileges or advantages which they have heretofore 
enjoyed, or be excluded from the enjoyment of benefits* 
which may hereafter be conferred on the people at hrge. 

23 



178 BEWA KAMTHA DIRECTOBY. 

(4) To safeguard all members of our services eqapbyei, 
in the ea ! d Presidency or Province in the legitimate exercise 
of their functions and in the enjoyment of all recognise^ 
rights and privileges, and to see that your Government 
order all things justly and reasonably in their regard 
and that due obedience is paid to all just and reasonable 
orders and diligence shown in their execution. 

(5) To take care that while the people inhabiting 
the eaid Presidency or Province shall enjoy all facilities for, 
the development of commercial and industrial undertakings, 
no monopoly or special privilege which is against the common 
interest shall be established and no unfair discrimination 
shall be made in matters affecting commercial or industrial 
interests. 

And we do hereby charge you to communicate these 
our instructions to the Members of your Executive Council 
and your Ministers and to publish the same in your Presi- 
dency or Province in such manner as you may think fit. 




........ »..._.,.,,..... or 

frottticAk B&tfteMS. T ll> 

His Majesty's Instructions to Viceroy. 

The following Revised Instrument of Instructions to 
the Governor-General of India in consequence of the passing 
of the Government cf India Act has been issued under the 
Royal Sign Manual : — 

These instructions were given to the Governor»G:meraf 
at the Buckingham Palace on the 1 5 oh Mi rob 1921: — 

Wbereas by the Government of India Act it is enacted 
that the Governor-General of India is appDinted by warranfc 
under our Royal Sign Manual, and we have by warrant 
constituted and appointed a Governor General to exercise 
the said office subject to such instructions and directions as 
he or our Governor-General for the time being shall, from 
time to time, receive or have received under cur Royal Sign 
Manual or under the hand of one of our principal Secretaries^ 
of State; and wLe:eas certain instructions were issued under 
our Royal Sign Manual to our said Governor-Goneral bearing 
date the 19th day of November 1918, and whereas by the 
coming into operation of the Government of India Act,. 
1&19, it has bacome necessary to revoke the said instruction* 
and to make further and other provisions in their stead:- 
Now, therefore, we do by these our instructions Under Oar 
Boyal Sign Manual hereby revoke the aforesaid instructions 
and declare our pleasure to be as follows : — 

■ 1. Our Governor-General " f>r the time baing (herein- 
after called our said Governor-General) shall, with all due 
solemnity, cause our warrant, under Our R >yal Sign Manual 
appointing him, to be read and published in the presence of r> 
the Chief Justice for the time being or in his absence of 
the Senior Judge of one of the High Courts established .in,.., 
British India and of so many of the Members of the Exeou- , 
tive Council of our said Governor-General as may conveniently - 
be assembled. 



•1§0 B1WA lUrlTCHA WBBCTORY. 

ADMINISTRATION OF OATHS. 

2. Our said Governor-General shall take the oith of 
allegiance and the oath for the due execution of the office 
of our Governor-General of India and for the due and 
impartial administration of justice in the forms hereto 
appended, which oaths the said Chief Justice for the tirm 
being or in his absence the Senior Judge of one of our said 
High Caurts shall, *nd he is hereby required to, tender and 
•administer unto him. 

3. And we do authorise and require our said Governor 
General from time to time by himself or by any other 
person, to be authorised by him in that behalf, to administer 
to every person who shall be appointed bv us by warrant* 
uudtr Our Royal Sign Manual to be a Governor of one 
of our Presidencies or Provinces in India and to every person 
who shall be appointed to be a Lieutenant-Governor or a 
Chief Commissioner, the oath of allegiance and of office in 
the said forms, and we do authorise and require our said 
Governor General from time to time by himself or by any 
other person to be authorised by him in that behalf, to 
administer to every person who shall ba appointed by us by 
warrant under Oar Royal Sign Manual or by the Secretary 
o£ State in Council of India to be a Member of the Gjvernor 
General's Executive Council or a Governor's Executive 
Council and to every person who shall be appointed to be a 
Member of a Lieutenant Governor's Executive Council and 
to every person whom any of our said Governors shall 
appoint to be a Minister the oaths of allegiance and of office 
in the said forms togethsr with the oath, of secrecy hereby 
appended. 

4. And we do further direct that every person who 
under these instructions shall be required to take an oath 
may make an affirmation in place ot an oath, if he has any 
objection to making an oath, 



POLITICAL REFORMS. 18 J 

GRANT OF PARDON:. 

5. And we do hereby authorise antd empower oar 
said Governor-Gsneral in our name and on our behalf to 
grant to any offender convicted in the exercise of its criminal 
jurisdiction by any Court ot Justice within our said terri* 
tories a pardon either free or subject to such lawtai conditions 
as to him may seem fit. 

POLICY OF PARLIAMBNT. 

6. And inasmuch as the policy of our Parliament is 
set forth in the preamble to the said Government of India 
Act, 1919, we do hereby require our sa ; d Governor-General 
to be vigilant that this policy is constantly furthered alike 
by His Government and by the Local Governments of all 
our Presidencies and Provinces. 

WISHES OF THE SUBJECTS. 

7. In particular it is our Will and Pleasure that the 
powers of superintendence direction and control over the s^id 
Local Governments vested in our said Governor General and 
in our Governor-General in Council shall, unless grave reason 
to the contrary appears, be exercised with a view to further- 
ing the policy of tUe LjciI Governm mfc of all our Governors* 
Provinces, whsn such policy fi ids favour wioh a majority of 
the Members of the Legislative Cjuncil of the Province. 

8. Similarly it is our Will and Pleasure that our said 
Governor General shall use all endeavours, consistent with the 
fulfilment of hi3 re-ponsibihti3S to us and our Parliament* 
for the welfare of our Indiaa subjects, that the administatioa 
of matters committed to the direct charge of our Governor 
General in Council may be conducted in harmony with 
the wishes of our said subjacts as expressed by their 
representatives in the Indian Legislature so far as the same 
shall appear to him to be just and reasonable* 



IW BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY, 

BE^PONStBLE GOVERNMENT. 

9. For above all things it is our Will and Pleasure 
that the plans laid by our Parliament for the progressive 
realisation of responsible Government in British India as an 
integral part of oar Empire may come to fruition to the 
end that British India may attain its due placa among our 
Dominions. Therefore we do charge our Governor-General 
by the means aforesaid and by all other means which may 
to him seem fit to guide the course of our subjects in India, 
vhose governance we have committed to his charge, so 
that, subject on the one hand always to the determination 
of our Parliament and on the other hand to the co-operation 
of those on whom new opportunities of serving have been 
conferred, progress towards such realisation may advance to 
the benefit of all our subjects in India. 

10. And we do hereby charge our said Governor* 
General to communicate these our instructions to the Mem- 
bers of His Executive Council and to publish the same in 
auch manner as he may think fit. 







POLITICAL REFORM*. l$|t 

His Imperial Majesty's Message i 
to the Princes and peoples of India* 

November 192L 

On landing at Bombay on the 17th November 1921 
H. R. H. the Prince of Wales delivered the following 
message to the gathering at the Appollo Bindar, consisting 
of Princes and people and high offi3ers of Government who 
had assembled to receive His Rjyal Highness. He said, 

" I have a message to deliver from His M%je3ty the 
King-Emperor. It is this : — 

" On this day, when my son land? for the first tims 
upon your shores, I wish to send through him m y greet- 
ings to you, the Princes and Peoples of India. His coming 
is a token and a renewal of the pledges of affection which, 
it has been the heritage of our house to reaffirm to yocL 
My father, when the Prince of Wales, counted it his privi- 
lege to see and, seeing, to understand the Empire in the 
East over which it was to be his destiny to rule, and I 
recall with thankfulness and pride that when he was called 
to the Throne, it fell to me to follow his illustrious 
example. 

" With this same hope and in this same spirit my 
eon is with you to day. The thought of his arrivil brings 
with a welcome vividness t3 my mind the happy memories 
I have stored of what I myself hare learned in India ; its 
charm and beauty, its immemorial history, its noble monumant^ 
and, above all, the devotion of India's faithful people, sines 
proved, as it by fire, in their response to tha Empire's 
oali in the hour of its greatest need. Taese memories 
will ever be with ma, as I trace his steps. My heart is 
▼ith him as he moves amongst yoj, and, with mints U» 



JBOm 



WWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



heart of the Queen Empress, whose love for India is no les^ 
than my own. To friends whose loyal by We ani Oar 
fathers have treasured, he brings this message of trust and 
hope. My sympathy in all that: passes in your lives is 
tmabating. Daring recent years my thoughts have been yet 
more constantly with you. Throughout the civilised world 
the foundations of social order have been tested by war and 
change. Wherever citizenship exists, it has had to meet the 
test, and India, like other countries, has been called on to 
fao9 new and special problems of her own. For this task 
her armoury is in new powers and new responsibilities with 
which she has been equipped. That with the help of those 
aided by the ready guidance of my Government and its 
officers, you will bring those problems to an issue worthy 
of your historic past and happiness for your future ; that 
all disquiet will vanish in well-ordered progress, is my 
earnest wish and my CDnfident balief. Your anxieties and 
your rejoicings are my own. Iq all that may touch your 
happiness, in all that gives you hope and promotes your 
welfare, I teel with you in the spirit of sympathy. 

t€ My son has followed from afar your fortunes. It is^ 
now his ambition by his coming aming you, to ripen good 
will into a yet fuller understanding. I trust and believe 
when he leaves your shores, your hearts will follow him and 
his will stay with you, and that one link the more will be 
added to the golden chain of sympathy which for these 
years has held my Throne to India. A.nd it is my warmest 
prayer that wisdom and contentment growing hand-in- 
hand will lead India into increasing national greatness 
within a free Empire, the Empire for which I labour and 
for which, if it be the Divine Will, my son shall labour 
after me." 



POLITICAL BKyOBMS-CH'AMBBB 6v PBIHCH& • 1$£ 

ROYAL PROCLAPTM 

ON THE OCCASION OP THE INAUGURATION 
OF THE CHAMBER OF PRINCES AT DELHI:— 

8th February 1921. 



George the Fifth, by the grace of God, of the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British 
Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, 
Emperor of India. To my Viceroy and Governor General and 
to the Prinzes and Rulers of the Indian Statds t greeting :— 

In my Royal Proclamation of December, 1919, I 
gave earnest of my affectionate care and regard for the 
ruling Princes and Chiefs of the Indian States by signifying 
my assent to the establishment of a Chamber of Princes. 
During the year that has since passed, my Viceroy and 
many of the Princes themselves have been engaged in 
iraming for my approval a constitution for the Chamber and 
the rules and regulations neeessary to ensure the emooth 
and efficient performance of its important functions. 

This work is now complete, and it remains for me to 
take the final steps to bring the Chamber into being in the 
confident hope that the united counsels of the Princes and 
Rulers assembled in formal conclave will be fruitful of lasting 
good, both to themselves and their subjects and, by 
advancing: the interests that are common to their territories 
and to British India, will benefit my Empire as a whole. 
It is in this hope that I have charged My Revered and 
Beloved Uncle, His Royal Highness the Duke of Connaught 
and Strathearn, to perform on my lehalf tha ceremony of 
the inauguration of the Chamber of Princes. 

It is my firm belief that a fuiure full of great and 
beneficent activities lies before the Chamber thus established, 
24 



286 MWA KAHTHA DIRBCTOBY. . 

To the Priftces long versed in the arts o£ government and 
statesmanship it will open still wider fields of Imperial service. 
It will afford them opportunities, of which I am convinced 
they will be prompt to avail themselves, of comparing 
experience, interchanging ideas, and framing mature and 
balanced conclusions on matters of common interest. Nor 
will less advantage accrue to my Viceroy and the officers 
serving; under him, to whom the prudent counsels and con- 
sidered advice of the Chamber cannot fail to be of the 
greatest assistance. 

The problems of the future must be faced in a spirit 
of cooperation and mutual trust. It is in this spirit that 
I summon the Princes of India to a larger share in my 
Council?. I do so in full reliance upon their devotion to 
my Throne and Per-on, proved as it has been both in long 
years cf peace and in the terrible ordeal of the great war 
and in the confident anticipation that by this means the 
bonds of muiual understanding will be strengthened and 
the growing identity of interests between the Indian States 
and the rest o£ my Fmpire will be fostered and developed. 

In my former Proclamation, I repeated the assurance 
given on many occasions by my Royal predecassors and 
myself of my determination ever to maintain unimpaired 
the privileges, rights aud dignities o£ the Princes of India. 
The Princes may rest assured that this pledge remains 
inviolate and inviolable. I now authorise my Viceroy to 
publish the terms cf the constitution of the new Caamber. 
My Viceroy will take its counsel freely in matters relating 
to the territories of the Indian States generally, and in 
matters that affect those territories jointly with British 
India or with the rest of my Empire. It will have no 
concern with the internal affairs of individual States or their 
rulers, or with the relations of individual States to my 
-Government, while the existing rights of the States and 
their freedom of action will ba in no way prejudiced or 



POLITICAL REFORMS 'CHAMBER OF PRINCES. 1SJ " 

impaired. It is my earnest lope that the Princes of India 
will take a regular part in the deliberations of the Chamber 
but attendance will be a matter of choice, not of constraint. 
There will be no obligation upon any memb?r to record his 
opinion, by vote or otherwise, upon any question that may 
come under discussion, and it is further my desire that, At 
the discretion of my Viceroy, an opportunity shall be given 
to any Prince who has not tnken a part in the deliberations 
of the Chamber to record his views on a y question that 
the Chamber has had under its consideration. 

I pray that the blessings of Divine Providence majr 
rest upon the labours of the Chamber, that its deliberations 
may be inspired by true wisdom and moderation, and that 
it may seek and find its bast reward in promoting the 
general weal and in increasing the strength and unity of 
the mighty Empire ov^r which I have been called upon to 
rule. 




188 BBWA EAKTHA DIMCTORY. 

THE YICEROY'S REVIEW. 



HOW THE SCHEME MATURED. 



The Viceroy Lord Chelmsford's speech was as follows:— • 
Your Royal Highness and Your Highnesses, 

Id the Royal Proclamation of the 23rd December, 
191&, His Imperial Majesty the King Enperor announced 
his gracious intention to send his dear son, the Prince of 
Wales, to India to inaugurate on hi3 behalf the new 
Chamber of Princes and the new constitutions in British 
India. The arduous labours of the Prince in other parts 
of the Empire, however, necessitated the postponement of his 
visit to Iudia, and His Imperial Majesty has sent, in his 
stead, His Royal Highness the Duke of Connaught, who 
will perform on His Imperial Majesty's behalf tshe ceremony 
of inauguration for which we are assembled here to day. 

1 feel that I am voicing the sentiments of all present 
on this occasion, when I say that while we deeply regret 
the postponement of the Prince's visit, and look forward with 
eager anticipation to his arrival among us next winter, we 
most cordially welcome the presence amoag us of His 
Royal Highness the Duke of Connaught, who is well known 
to the Princes and peoples of India, and whose assosiation 
with this ceremony is a token of the deep interest taken by 
the King Emperor in the welfare of the Indian States. 

GENESIS OP THE CHAMBER. 

Before calling upon His Royal Highness to perform 
the act of in-auguration, it is fitting that I, as His Majesty's 
Viceroy and as being responsible, with the Secretary of 
State, for the proposals in the Joint Report on Indian 
constitutional reforms, should say something of the genesis 
of the Chamber of Princes, its object and significance, the 



POLITICAL REFORMS-CHAMBBR OF PRINCES. 189 

"stages of its evolution, and the conditions essential to its 

success. The germ of such an assemblage as this must b& 

sought in the events of 1877, when Her late Majesty Queen 

Victoria assumed the title of Eua press of India and was 

acclaimed as such by the great Princes present at thfr 

Imperial Assemblage, and when Lord Ijytton canceled the 

idea of associating with the high officers of Government 

some of the leading Princes with the title of l€ Councillors 

of the Ecnpress." The idea was further developed by the 

succeeding Viceroys, Lord Dufferin, who instituted the 

Imperial Service Troops movement, Lord Gurzon and Lord 

Minto, who propounded a scheme for a Council of Princes^ 

and Lord Hardinge who consulted the Princes as " trusted 

colleagues* * on various matters affecting their order. 

Finally it was my pleasant privilege, on assuming 
charge of my office five years ago, to institute a system of 
annual conferences of Princes and Chiefs for tho discussion* 
in concert with the officers of my Government, of questions 
affecting the States as a whole and of common import to 
them and to the Indian Empire. The success of these 
informal conferences soon gave rise to the demand for a 
permanent institution of a more formal character, and a 
proposal for the creation of such an institution was pat* 
forward in the joint report of April, 1918, and laid before 
the Princes at the Conference of January, 1919, together 
with certain other proposals in the report for their collective 
opinion. 

THE CHAMBER POUNDED. 

After an animatad debate the Conference passed a 
resolution warmly approving the establishment of a permanent! 
Council of Princes, with the title of Narendra Mandal 
(Chamber of Princes). Resolutions were also passed at the 
same time approving the appointment of a mixed Cjmn^ittee 
to examine the question of simplifying, standardising and 
modifying folitic- 1 pract ice a and cf a StaadW Com flitUa 



l&r 



REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



' to advise the Viceroy and the Political Department on 
matters referred to it by the Viceroy regarding the affairs 
ot Indian States. The proposals in the report of Courts of 
Arbitration and Commissions of Enquiry and for the 
establishment of direct relations between the Government of 
India and the important States, all measures designed with 
the object of securing uniformity of policy and practice and 
a method of dealing with difficult and important problems 
which would command the confidence of the Princes, were 
also generally approved. The recommendations of the 
Conference were then placed before tha Secretary of Stat9, 
with whom various details were discussed, and in the next 
Conference held in November 1919, I was able to propound 
for Their Highness' consideration the general seheme for a 
Chamber of Princes approved by His Majesty's Government. 

The Conference, after debating the question, passed a 
resolution warmly accepting the scheme and expressing the 
e<arnest hope that tho Chamber might be brought into 
existence during the ensuing year. With this end in view I 
enlisted the advice and criticism of the Codification Committee 
of Princes which had been appointed by th9 Conference, and 
with their assistance the drafts of the institution of the 
Chamber, with the first regulations and rules of businees 
and the draft resolutions concerning Courts of Arbitration 
and Commissions of Ecquiry were moulded into practical 
shape, and I am glad to say that the drafts finally approved 
and published represent almost verbatim the general policy 
approved by the Conference on the advice of their Codifica- 
tion Committee. 

THE EKGLISH TITLE. 

There is one departure from the recommendations of 
the Conference which, I fear, will be a disappointment to 
some of Your Highnesses, and that is the adoption of a 
^urety' English title for the Chamber. As you are aware, I 



POLITICAL R1FOBMS-OHAMKR OF FRINCBS. f , . 191 



i 



suspended judgmeut on the proposed title of f t Nareoflm. 
Mandal pending farther enquiry as to the general feeling of 
the Princes on the subject. That enquiry disclosed a 
general consensus of opinion among the Mahomedan rulers, 
against a Hindu title, and in favour of a purely English 
designation. This preference was also expressed by some 
Hindu and Sikh rulers, aad it was ace ^raingly decided, afoer 
reference to the Secretary of State, to use for the present! 
the English title of Chamber of Princes as the sole designa- 
tion. The question of adopting an Indian title b*s, however* 
been included in the agenda for the Srsti meeting of the 
Chamber, and it will be open to Your Highnesses to 
propose an Indian title or titles which will tue^t with general 
acceptance. * 

Another point on which the published constitution 
differs from the wording favoured by the Committee of 
Princes, who were consulted on the subject, is the absolute 
prohibition of the discussion in the Chamoec of the internal 
affairs of individual States and the actions of individual 
rulers. The Princes on the Committee w^ra in favour of 
allowing such discussion, provided t tat the ruler concerned 
so desires and the Viceroy consents. His Majesty's Grovern* 
ment accepted the view of the Government of India that! 
such a provision might prove embarrassing to trie Viceroy 
and that the practice, ic recognised, woull be subversive of 
the principle on which the constitution of the Chamber ia 
based. It was decided, therefore, that* the rule against tha 
the discussion of such matters in the Caamber should be 
absolute and unqualified. I think that Your Highnesses, oa 
reflection, will agree that this decision is reasonable and 
just. 

CHAMBER'S MAIN FUMOHOtf. 

The main function of the Ciiambar it to disease 
matters affecting the States geaecalty zc of o.au.Mi ojaoara 
to the States and to Bntisa India or fcha E uoira »t hc^. 



192 ltBWA KAKTHA HRKCTORt. 

It would in cur opinion *b>e iatal to the poptilarttfjr ;and 
euecess of the Chamber, if any countenance were given to 
the idea that \% might be used for the discussion of private 
affairs of individual States and rulers. States which desire 
that the Viceroy may be in possession of independent and 
expert advice before deciding matters in dispute, either 
between individual States or between an individual State 
and Government, can have recourse to the Courts cA Arbi- 
tration, where these matters can be examined in the privacy 
essential to such cases. Commissions of enquiry provide 
similar machinery for dealing with the affairs of individual 
rulers. 

As regards the question of direct relations between 
the Government of India and the important States, I may 
inform you that a recommendation has been made to the 
Secretary of State for the transfer of the more important 
States in the Bombay Presidency, according to a scheme 
prepared by a special committee, to be carried into effect 
at some futura date, when the conditions appear to be 
favourable. A scheme will also shortly be placed before His 
Majesty's Government for the bringing of the important 
States of the Punjab into direct relations with the Govern- 
ment of India, as soon as the necessary arrangements can 
be made. The Gwalior State will soon be brought inte 
direct touch with the Central Government through a 
Resident, who will be independent of the Central India 
Agency, and some of the Rajputana States which were 
formerly in relations with a local Resident are now in 
direct relations with the Agent to the Governor General in 
Rajputana. Other aspeots of the question of direct relations 
are engaging the attention of the Government of India. 
THE CONSTITUTION. 

Reverting to the question of the Chamber of Princes, 
"Sour Highnesses will have received the proposals made by 
the CoDomittee for the representation of lesser States whose 



POLITICAL REFORMS-CHAMBER OF PRINCES. 193 

-•.-••■'•• -,*■■■ x ...■'. 

rulers are not eligible for admission . to the Chamber of 
Princes in their own right. These proposals, which it is 
hoped to embody in the regulations before the next session 
of the Chamber, will be submitted for Your Highness* con- 
sideration after the inaugural meeting. I do not propose to 
describe the details of the constitution, regulations, and 
rules to-day, since these documents hive been for some time 
in Your Highness' hands and they represent in the main 
the fruit of your own deliberations. 

But there are one or two aspects ef the schem9 on 
which it is right that I should dwell on this historic occa- 
sion- The Chamber of Princes is an advisory and consul- 
tative body and has no executive powers. It represents a 
recognition of the right of the Princas to be consulted in 
framing the policy of Government relating to the Statas 
and to have a voice in the Councils of the Empire, but the 
resolutions of the Chamber, though carried by a majority of 
votes, will be in the nature of advic9 and will not necessarily 
be acted on by the Viceroy, who will be bound to take into 
consideration not only the merits of the particular resolution, 
but also the views of the opposing minority as well as the 
opinions of those Princes who happen to be absent from 
the Chamber. I think it well to call attention to those 
points, because I have heard it said by the critics of the 
Chamber that it will tend to belittle the position and 
prejudica the rights of the greater States, who may be out- ' 
voted by a combination of States of leaser importance. The 
criticism is, I think, unjustified by the terms of the consti- 
tution and loses sight of the safeguards which I have 
mentioned. 

BY ROYAL PROCLAMATION. 

The constitution of the Chamber has received the 
approval of His Majesty's Government and has been promul* 
gat 3d by Royal Proclamation. lb will be inaugurated to- , 
day by His Royal Highness the ,* Duke of Conn aught on 



*$4 b»WA MARTHA fclBECTOfct. 

behalf of His Imperial Majesty, lb behoves us all to dp 
our utmost to make the scheme a real success, a source 
o£ strength to the Empire, an engine of progress, and a 
means of promoting unity and co-operation between the 
representatives of His Majesty's Government in this 
country, and the Princes and Chiefs of this great E npire. 
I do not think that the Chamber is likely to fail in achieving 
the objects which I have mentioned ; indeed, I am confident 
that with good will on both sides it will succeed. 

But there are certain matters to which I feel it my 
duty to call Your Highnesses* attention. First, there is 
the danger that after the first excitement of attending the 
opening of the Chamber has passed away, interest in its 
proceedings may evaporate, and the attendance of members 
may dwindle. I look to Your Highnesses to prjvent this 
process. Attendance at the meetings will always be volun- 
tary, and no pressure will be applied to those who^ prefer 
to stay away ; but I trust that as time goes on, Your 
Highnesses will realise more and more the importance of 

.maintaining these assemblages as meetings of a truly repre- 
sentative character, and that even those who now stai d 
aloof will in time forego those scruples and lend their 
influence towards promoting the objects of the Chamber 

-and so strengthening the bonds which bind us together 
{)t the common good. 

THE PRINCES' OBLIGATIONS. 

Secondly, there is the possibility which some critics 
have noted ; (I only mention it to dismiss it), that the 
machinery of thi3 Chamber might be used solely for the 
protection of the rights and privileges of the Princes without 
due regard to the obligations which they owe both to the 
Empire, of which they are a part, and to their subjects 
whose happiness and welfare are dependent upon the wisdom 
-and justice of their rulers. I do not share these appro* 



POLITICAL BBFORMS-CHAMBBR OF PRItfCES. 1JKT 

hensions, for here again I confidently look to Your High- 
nesses to uphold the credit of this institution by adopting 
both towards the Government and its officers a spirit of 
co-operation, without which our deliberations will be of 
Bmall avail. 

We are all members one Empire and "a our union 
lies our strength. We share between us the responsibility 
for the good Government of India and for protecting the 
interests and promoting the happiness of: t'ie millions com- 
mitted to our charge. In the exercise of that responsibility 
we shall, I am sure, continue to work together in harmony 
and with mutual respect, inspired by the graat ideal of an 
India governing itself through its princes and elected 
representatives and owing allegiance to a common head. 

I now invite His Royal Highness the Duke of 
Connaught to inaugurate on behalf of His Imperial Majesty 
the King Emperor the Chamber of Princes and to declare 
it to be duly constituted. 




196 BBWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 



HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS' SPEECH 



His Koyal Highness replying said : — 

Your Excellency and Your Highnesses, — It is by the 
command of His Imperial Majesty the King-Emperor, that 
I meet you to-day. My duty is two-fold. — to convey to 
Your Highnesses the personal greetings of His Majesty and 
on his behalf to inaugurate the Chamber of Princes. In 
His Royal Proclamation the King-Emperor has signified his 
approval of this new constitution and his hopes for its 
future. Its origin and meaning have just^been explained by 
the Viceroy. 

I have only one word to add to what His Excellency 
has said on this subject. An assembly so unique and so 
essentially Indian in character should surely not be known 
only by an English designation. I trust that among the 
earliest tasks to which Your Highnesses will address your- 
selves in the Chamber will be that of choosing an appro* 
priate vernacular title which you can unite in recommending 
to His Majesty the King. 

Your Highnesses, of the many ceremonies that it 
has fallen to my lot to perform, none has given me more 
pleasure than the inauguration of the Gnamba: of Princes. 
Among the Princes here assembled are many with whom I 
can claim personal friendship of long standing. I rejoice at 
the opportunity of renewing their acquaintance and of 
reviving old bonds of fellowship and regard. No pleasure is 
so keen as that which we share with old friends. I have 
the happiness of knowing that my own pleasure in to-day's 
proceedings finds a counterpart in your Highness* own 
feelings, and that the function in which it is my privilege 



POLITICAL REFORMS-CHAMBER OF PRINCES.. 197 

to join will stand for all as a shining landmark in the 
annals of the Indian States. 

AT THE BIDDING OF THE EMPEROR. 

We are assembled to-day in the ancient capital of 
India. This noble Hall in which we meet, where the 
Mognl Emperor, surrounded by the splendour of his magni- 
ficent Court, used to hear the petitions of his people, has 
been the scene of many imposing ceremonies. It is a fitting 
stage for the ceremony of to-day, but I stand at the bidding 
of an Emperor mightier even than the Moghul, an Emperor 
whose policy is framed with a breadth of vision unknown 
to the rulers of the past ages, whose acts are inspired, as 
he himself has declared, by the spirit of trusts and sympathy t 
whose desire it is that every breadth of suspicion or misunder- 
standing should be dissipated, and who now invites your 
Highnesses in the fulness of his confidence to take a larger 
share in the political development of your Motherland. 

The Princes of India have shown for many past years, 
and more particularly during the great war, their devotion 
tp the Crown and their readiness to make any sacrifice for 
the safety and welfare of the Empire. When most was 
needed, most was given. His Majesty has watched with 
feelings of deep pride and gratitude the part taken by your 
Highnesses in the war. The devotion of those who gave 
personal service in the field, the patriotic zeal of those who 
sent their troops to the front and furnished recruits for the 
Indian Army, the lavish generosity of those who helped 
with money and material, — for all these services His Majesty 
has asked me to convey to your Highnesses on his behalf a 
special message of thanks. 

TRADITIONAL LOYALTY. 

Loyalty is a tradition with the Indian States. His 
Majesty knows well that, in good times or evil, he can 
always count upon the fidelity and unswerving support of 



198 BXWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



the Indian Prinees. But with the memories of the past 
bix years ever present in his mind, he cannot forbear or* 
this great occasion from making public acknowledgment. 
During the greatest struggle \n the history of mankind, the 
help that you gave at the "outbreak of war, when the tate 
of your deeds and offerings sent a thrill of emotion 
throughout the British Empire, and your strenuous efforts shone 
forth in the dark days of 1918, when the fate of civilisation 
seemed to be hanging in the balance, can only ba forgotten 
with the Empire itself. I am confident that the same spirit 
of loyalty and co-operation that your Highnesses displayed 
during the war will continue to animate you in the years 
to come. 

It is in this spirit, as His Majesty has said, that the 
problems of the future must be faced. It is in this spirit, 
I do not doubt, that you will approach tba question that 
will form the subject of your deliberations in the Chamber. 
Some of the problems that will arise may make damands 
on your patience and public spirit. Some may depand for 
their solution upon a fair interpretation of the lettei of 
treaties and engagements b9t ween the States and the British 
Government. If so, I feel sure that a way will be found to 
reconcile any doubts or differences that may present them- 
selves. The sanctity of treaties is a cardinal article of 
Imperial policy. It was affirmed by my beloved mother, 
the Great Queen Victoria, in her famous pjoclamation of 
1858. It was reaffirmed by King Edward the Seventh, 
and his present Majesty, King George the Fifth, has once 
more announced in this proclamation his determination ever 
to maintain unimpaired the privileges, rights and dignities 
of the Princes. 

RECIPROCAL GENEROSITY 

Nothing is wanting to mark the solemnity of this 
time-honoured engagement, and no wjrds of mine are needed 
to reassure Your Highnesses that the British Government 



POLITICAL REFORMS-CHAMBER «7 PRINCW. 199 

will stand faithfully by its promises. I would only ask you, 
when you come to discuss any difficult question of practice 
in your relations with the Government of India, or of the 
interpretation of your treaties, to remember that th933 pledges 
will be ever present to the minds of the officers cf the 
British Crown. A generous spirit on your p*rb will find 
its response in equal -generosity on the part of the Govern- 
ment of India. You may rest assured that the Government! 
and its officers will rec >gnise ; freely the internal sovereignty 
to which your various treaties and engagements entitle you. 
We look to the Princes of India on their parb bo continue 
to administer their States with justice- and enlightenment. 
• I am confident that we shall not look in vain. 

Your Highnesses. — It is a sincere pleasnre to me to 
congratulate you on the place that au a bo-ly you have 
achieved for yourselves in recent yeara in the wider Coun* 
oils of tin Empire. You have been represented in the 
Imperial War Cabinet and at the Imperial Conference. One 
of your number took parb in the Peace Conference o£ 1919 r 
and his signature is appended to the Treaty of Versailles* 

More lecently another of your order attended the League of 

Nations Assembly at G mva. 

A HALF CENTURY OF CHANGE. 

Your Highnesses, — I have witnessed many changes in 
my life-time. Much of the old order, as I knew it in, my 
youth, has passed away for ever; For all classes the past 
60 years have been an era of change, and the Princes of th* 
great Indian States furnish no exception to the general rule. 
Their conditions in life have been profoundly modified. They 
have emerged from the seclusion that so long hedged them 
round, and they aspire, and rightly, to play a part in the 
wider theatre of modern life I am sure that the part will 
be a worthy one. The British Government has not baea 
slow to recognize the justice of your aspirations, and I 
rejoice to think that by my share in today's ceremony, I 



300 KEWAKANTHA DIRECTORY. 

am doing something to promote your wishes and to provide 
a larger sphere for ybur ptiblic spirited activities and increased 
opportunities which, I need not remind Your Highnesses, 
bring in their train increased responsibility. 

I know well that Your Highneeses will appreciate the 
trust reposed in you by His Imperial Majesty and His 
Government and will worthily respond, both ag pillars of 
Empire and as rulers, striving ever for the greater happiness 
and prosperity of your own subjects. 

I now, on behalf of the King Emperor, declare the 
Chamber of Princes to be duly constituted and pray that 
under Divine Providence its proceedings may be so guided 
and directed as to strengthen the bonds of union between 
the Princes and the Empire, and to promote the well-being 
of this great land of India and enhance her good name 
among the nations of the world. 




FOLITICJLL AKFOBkJHCHlMBtR OF PRIHCES- Sfit 

mm RESOLVE. 



SPEECHES IN SUPPORT, 



The Maharajah of Gwtlior said:—- 

••Your Excellency, Your Royal Highmss,— On behalf 
of the Prince 8 cf India assembed on this memorable occasion 
I beg to move the following resolution : — 

"This representative gathering of the Princes resolves* 
to convey to His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of India their 
respectful greetings, the assurance of their abiding loyalty 
to his Throne so deeply rooted in their affections an J of 
their steadfast devotion to his august Person, also to voice 
their genuine gratification at the inauguration by Royal 
Proclamation o£ the Chamber of Princes. Next they resolve 
to affirm that their feeling of intense satisfaction is only 
equalled by their consciousness of the honour done them in 
the deputation of Field-Marshal His Royal Highness the 
Dii&e of Connaught to inaugurate this Chamber, a deputa- 
tion which vividly recalls th* biassed memory of Qieea 
Victoria the Good, whose proclamation cf 1858 is the orys^ 
talised expression of Her Royal Heart's great love for India. 
This inauguration by His Royal Highness is all the more 
gratifying owing to his earlier association with this country 
and his position as a member of the Imperial House of 
Windsor, and of an innate capacity to appreciate the heredi- 
tary rulers' point of view. Further they resolve to place on 
record their profound appreciation of the genuine goodwill, 
consummate statesmanship and deep insight which prompted 
His Excellency the Viceroy Lord Chelmsford, the gifted 
Prime Minister the Right Hon'ble David Lloyd Gaorge, ' 
thfct fearless and true friead of India, His Imperial Majesty** - 
Secretary of State, the Right Hon*bte E 1 win Montagu and 
26 



202 BBWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. , 

the eminent statesmen who form His Imperial Majesty's* 
Government to brirtg to a happy issue tbe schema of the 
Chamber of Princes. 

A GREAT PRIVILEGE. 

I deem it a great privilege that it has fallen to my 
lot to move the lesolation which I have just) read. It U 
quite unnecessary for me in moving it to dilate up^n the 
eVent to which it refers or the happy circumstances, which 
have attended its occurrence, for, indeed, the terms of the 
resolution drawn up by one common consent amply testify 
to the feelings occasioned by the formation of the Princas* 
Chamber. Your Royal Highness, wa cannot bub adaoure 
the devotion to duoy waioh inspired your willing compliance 
with the command of our beloved Enparor to visit InlU 
and perform this ceremony, regardless o£ c}nsiderations of 
distance and, may we add, of age. For this ready response 
to the occasion I am sure we are very grateful to Your 
Royal Highness, and we flatter ourselves by thinking thafc 
you have found the performance o£ to-day's ceremony agree- 
able and in accord with Your Royal predilections. 

Respecting Yonr Excellency, may I venture to stats 
that your name will always bj associated in history with 
one of the most critical stages in the evolution o£ India?' 
Your Viceroyalty has witnessed remarkable happiness. 
Indeed we are witnesses to the re-birth of the world accepted 
notions, and proved theories seeju all to be undergoing forced 
revision. May it please Merciful Providano3 that the naw 
order, which is supplanting the old, may bring a cyale of 
peace and good will tor humanity. Th9 world conditions 
have been, as was inevitable, more or less reflected in India, 
so that Your Excellency has had to face problems calculated 
to strain the nerves of steel, and tax the most resourceful 
mind. During that period of stress anl anxiety Your 
Excellency wa3 at pains unflinchingly to do what duty 
appeared inexorably to dictate. What can man do batter 



POLITICAL BEFORMS-CHAMBBR OF *RINC153, 20fr 

than be true to himself, that is to his O3no9ptions of duty 
to tha King of Kings. It is in th9 spirit of that concep- 
tion that Your Excellency doubtless endeavoured to serve 
this country. Finally, the cuich desired C'aamber has been 
brought into being, and it only remains foe me fervently to 
pray that its session miy help to produce better mutual 
understanding and promote hearty and effjejive cooperation 
between the British Government ani the Princes of India. 



The Maharajah of Bikanir* 



THE APPEAL OP THE CROWN. 



In seconding the resolution the Maharaja of Bikaner 
said :— 

Your Excellency, Your Royal Highness, — I deem it 
an hononr on this historic occasion to have b?en commis- 
sioned by my brother Princes, to second the resolution just 
moved by my esteemed friend, His Highness the Maharajah 
Scindia. The unflinching loyalty and devoted attachment, 
with which the Princes of India are inspired towards the 
Throne and Person of His Imperial Majesty the King 
Emperor, has stood the test of time, through every period 
of stress and storm during a hundred years and more. The 
Imperial Crown is the one centripetal force in the Empire, 
which attracts and welds together all its component parts, 
an undisputed fact which accounts for the remarkable unity, 
and cohesion, during the dark days of the war, of the different 
countries farming the British Commonwealth of Nations, ant 
to no one does the Imperial Crown appeal as a greater 
binding and inspiring force than to us, the Pri rices of India/ 



^$EWA 54HTSA PIBKCTQRY... 

The gracious interest which EUs Imperial : M&jesty th$ 
King-Emperor, together with Her Imperial Majesty, the 
Queen Empress, has at all times been pleased to evince 
in the Princes and < States of India, his ever-to-be remembered 
appeal for greater sympathy tor Iadia and the Indians, and 
the watchword of hope, which he gave to us all in 1912, 
have been sources of the liveliest gratification to us and 
have helped to stimulate and sustain us in ail periods of 
difficulty and anxiety, whilst the solicitude displayed in 
our behalf by the establishment of the Chamber of Princes, 
and the reiteration in the Royal Proclamation of the gracious 
assurances regarding the inviolability of previous Imperial 
pledges safeguarding our privileges, rights and dignities, 
will find a most loyal and grateful echo in the Indian 
States throughout the length and breadth of this country. 
And it is our devout prayer that His Imperial Majesty 
may long be spared to guide tae destinies o£ India and 
other parts of the Empire to further happiness and pros- 
perity; and to afford to all concerned an inspiring example 
of the same devotion to duty and regard for the common- 
good, which has so largely contributed to knit the Empire 
into still closer bonds of loyal and patriotic unity. 

A HAPPY OMEN. 

Wq not only deem it a high honour, but we regard 
it, as a matter cf happy omen, that the ceremony of in- 
augurating the Caamber of Princes today should have been 
entrusted by His Imperial Majesty to such an illustrious 
and popular member of the Imperial House of Windsor as 
Your Royal Highness, whose name is held in the highest 
affection and esteem by the Princes and people of India. I 
feel that I am voicing the sentiments of my brother Princes, 
when I give expression to our great disappointment that 
the other calls upon Your Royal Highnes*' time have nob 
left you sufficient leisure to honour any of our States by a 
*isit on this occasion. But we look forward with e»gar 



POLITICAL ,REFQRM$-CHAHBBS OF P&IHCBS. 2(^ 

anticipations to welcoming His Royal Highness the Prinoa 

of Wales to several of our States next cold weather, by , 
when we sincerely hope that His Royal Highness will have 
been restored to his usual health and vigour, after his recent 
arduous exertions in the course of his triumphant Imperial 
mission. 

I beg also to associate myself with His Highness the 
Maharajah Scindia in expressing our gratitude to Your 
Excellency and to Mr. Montagu and to the Prime Minister 
and His Imperial Majesty's Government. The solidarity 
and identity of interests between the British Government 
and the Princes are, indeed, very real, and I would, in 
conclusion, give expression to our profound convbbion that 
the Chamber of Princes will not only prove of great benefit 
to us, but that it will also prove to be a true Imperial 
asset. And we rejoice to feel that we shall have, in Your 
Excellency's successor, a sagacious statesman like Lord 
Reading who, we earnestly trust, will develope stilt 
further the sympathetic policy of the British Government 
towards the Princes and States, whereby we may be enabled 
to take an ever increasing share in upholding the honour: 
and glory of our beloved Emperor and of the mighty 
Empire. 



MAHARAJAH OP PATIALA. 

Red~Letter Day* 

The Maharajah of Patiala, in supporting the Maharaja 
of Gwalior's resolution, said : — 

Your Excellency, Your Royal Highness, — To day is 
a red letter day in the history of Indian States, for tp-day 
we are witnessing the fulfilment of hopes which wa have 
been cherishing tor the creation of the Chamber, that justi 
now has been brought into existaaca by the R?yal Procla- 
mation of His Imperial Majesty. It is unnecessary forme 



206 BEWA fcANTHA DIBBCTOBY. 

to dwell at length upon the manifold benefits which this* 
Chamber will place within reach of the Rulers of Indian 
States, but two aspects that appeal to me most are, the* 
feeling of solidarity that will grow among us and the 
enhanced opportunities of co-operation between the British 
Government and ourselves. Time and again men, who canr 
speak with the highest authority, have said that the Indian 
States aae the pillars and bulwarks of the British Empire, 
and I hope wa may venture to claim, what experience haer^ 
proved conclusively, that whenever there has been aa 
opportunity to test the link subsisting between us and the 
Crown of England, it has proved stronger than before. The 
creation of our Chamber will, 1 feel confident, make this 
connection more endaring than ever. 

NEW FACTS : NEW PROBLEMS. 

We are passing through momentous times, and in all 
parts of the rorld men and governments are facing new 
facts and new problems. The great British Empire, of 
which we are proud to bean integral part, has its owa 
problems, the solution of which would require all the 
wisdom and all the courage it can command. The Princes* 
of India realize fully that, as Rulers of men, they cannot 
lemain unaffected by what may well be called world move* 
ments, and they must be prepared to tackle the new situa- 
tion with the principal object of making their present* 
interest identical with those of their people. From this 
point of view, the educative value of this Chamber will be 
great, and let us hope that its future history will show 
many a bright page of solid selfless work done in the 
interests of our order and of the people whom providence 
has entrusted to our care. 

It is my pleasoat duty on this occi3ion to give ex- 
pression to our fervent feelings of gratitude to the King- 
Emperor who has, by establishing this Caamber, made 
stronger than ever tha link that unites us to his august 



POLITICAL BEFORMS-CHAMBBR OF PRINCES.. 207 

Throne. We shall be extremely thankful, if Your Royal 
Highness will convey to His Majesty our deep sense of 
ever-abiding loyalty and affection, and assure him that he 
will always Snd us ready to make every sacrifise which the 
occasion may demand. Our grateful thanks are alsi due to 
Your Royal Highness for so nobly undertaking the duty 
of bringing to us the great message of hope and goodwill 
from His Majesty, and we *re sure that whatever personal 
inconvenience \our Royal Highness may have experienced 
will be more than compensated by the general satisfaction 
occasioned by this great event. Aid last, but n>r least, we 
feel grateful to jour Excellency for the sympathy with which 
from the very beginning, you have considered the proposal 
of creatiag this Chamber and for giving our various proposals 
your kind support. 

With these few words I beg to support the resoiutioa 
before us. 



MAHARAJAH OP ALWAR. 



A MESSENGER OF GOODWILL. 

The Maharaja of ASwar, in supporting the Maharaja 
Scindbia's resolution in the Chamber of Princes, welcomed 
the Duke as a Royal messenger of good will and peace at 
a time when dark clouds were hovering over th9 Indian 
horizon, just as they appeared in other parts of tin world. 
The Maharaja expressed his disappointment ab the post- 
ponement of the Prince of Wales' visit, bat declared that 
the Prince, when he would come next winter, would receive 
a, greater and war mar reception in India than he was aosordel 
in other parts of the Empire. Concluding (he Maharaja felto 
confident that under British guidance, India Wjuld emerge 
as a self-supporting partner of a mighty Empire. 



POLITICAL REFORMS-CHAMBER OF PRINCES. 20£' 

THE CHAMBER'S CONSTITUTION. 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 

In pursuance of the authorisation of His Imperial 
Majesty the King-Emperor contained in the Royal Pro- 
clamation dated the 8th day of February 1921, His Excellency 
the Viceroy is pleased to publish the Constitution of the 
Chamber of Princes for general information, the same being 
as follows : — 

(1) The Viceroy shall be the President of the Chamber, 

(2) The Chamber shall consist of Members and Repre- 
sentative members. 

Th$ Members of the Chamber shall be — 

(i) Rulers o£ States who enjoyed permanent dynastic 
s&lutes cf 1 1 guns or over on the 1st January 1920; and 

(ii) Rulers of States who exercise such fuli or practi- 
cally full internal powers as, in the opinion of the 
Viceroy, qualify them for admission to the Chamber. 

The Representative Members of the Chamber shall be 
such Rulers of States, not qualified for admission under 
sub- clauses (i) and (ii) above, as may be appointed under 
the regulations. 

(3) The Chamber shall be a deliberative, consultative 
and advisory bat not an execu'ive body. 

(4) The furctions of the Chamber shall be— 

(i) to initiate, in accordance with the rules of busi- 
ness, proposals, and to make recommendations relat- 
ing to the preservation and maintenance of treaties 
and of the rights and interests, dignities *nd powers, 
privileges and prerogatives of the Princes and. 
Chiefs, their States and the members of their families 
27 



210 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

(ii) to discuss and make representations upon matters 
of Imperial or common concern, and subjects referred 
to the Chamber tor consideration by the Viaeroy. 

(iii) to appoint committees cf experts and others to 
advise the Chamber upon technical or other intricate 
questions. 

(iv) to appoint a Chancellor of the Chamber and a 
Standing Committee, such appointments to be 
made in accordance with the regulations by which 
the functions of the Chancellor and Standing Com- 
mittee will also be defined. 

(v) to propose, for the consideration of the Vi3eroy t 
regulations for any purpose connected with the 
Chamber or rules of business, or amendments or 
alterations of the regulations or rules, and 

(vi) to deal with any other matter provided for by the 
regulations or rules. 

5. No proposal affecting the constitution of the Chamber 
shall be brought up before it or discussed, except with the 
leave of the Viceroy. 

6. The functions of the Chamber shall only be exercisable 
when at least 30 Members and Representative Menabsrs are 
present at a Meeting, duly convened in accordance with the 
rules of business. 

7. The recommendations of the Chamber shall be made 
in accordance with the vote of the majority present, and 
voting thereon. 

Members and Representative Members of the Chvjibar 
only will be entitled to vote, each Member or Representative 
Member having one vote. 

8. The attendance of Members! Representative Mem* 
bers and voting in the Chamber shall be voluntary. 



POLITICAL BEFOBMS-CHAMBEB OF PRINCES.. 211 

9. There shall be a Secretary of the Chamber to be 
appointed by the Viceroy, whose duty it will be to record 
in a book of proceedings all recommendations of the Chamber 
and to submit copies thereof for the consideration of the 
Viceroy, who will take such action as he may see fit. Copies 
of all such recommendations shall be sent by the Secretary to 
all Members and Representative Members of the Chamber. 

10. Treaties and internal affairs of individual States, 
rights and interests, dignities and powers, privileges and 
prerogatives of individual Princes and Chiefs, their Statas 
and the members of their families, and the actions of indi- 
vidual Ruler3 shall not be discussed in the Chamber. 

11. The institution of the Chamber shall not prejudice, 
in any way, the engagements or the relations of any State 
with the Viceroy or Governor-General, (inoluding the right of 
direct correspondence), nor shall any recommendation of the 
Chamber in any way prejudice the rights or restrict the 
freedom of action of ar y State. 

J 2. The first Regulations shall be the Regulations set 
out in the schedule hereto, which may be varied or added 
to from time to time by the Viceroy in consultation with 
the Chamber. 

13. Rules for the conduct of the business of the 
Chamber (hereinbefore referred to as Rules of Business) shall 
be made by the Viceroy in consultation with the Chamber, 
and may be varied or added to from time to tiiie. 

14. The Viceroy may, for the purpose of any meeting of 
the Chamber, suspend any of the Rules of Business. 



* 



212 REWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

SCHEDULE. 



( Vide Clause 12 of the Constitution.) 
First Regulations. 
I — Regulations regarding the appointment of Chancellor. 

1. The Chancellor will be elected from among the 
Members of the Chamber. Both Members and Representa- 
tive Members will be entitled to vote at the election which 
will be held in accordance with the Rules set out in 
Appendix A hereto. 

2. The Chancellor will hold office until the conclusion 
of the first annual meeting after that at which he was 
elected. 

3. In the event of a casual vacancy occurring from 
any cause in the office of Chancellor^ the Member, who at 
the last preceding election obtained the next highest number 
of votes, shall act as Chancellor during the vacancy. 

II. — Regulations regarding the appointment of 
the Standing Committee. 

1. The Standing Committee will consist of five mem- 
bers including the Chanceilor who will be a Member of the 
Committee ex officio. The other four Mecnbers will be elected 
from Members of the Chamber. Both Members and Repre- 
sentative Members will be entitled to vote at the election 
which will be held in accordance with the Rules set out in 
Appendix B hereto. 

2. Of the five Members of the Committee one must 
be a Member from the Bombay Status, one from the 
Central India States, one from the Rajpulana States and 
one from the Punjab States. 



POLITICAL REFORMS-CHA.MBE& OT? PRINCES. 21$ 

3. The Members will continue to hold office till the 
Conclusion of the first annual meeting aft^r that at which 
they were elected. Members will be eligible for re-election 
at the end of the period, 

4. The funccions of the Standing Committee will be 
to advise tie Viceroy 0:1 questions referred bo the Committee 
by the Viceroy, and to people for his consideration other 
questions affecting Indian States Generally r which a*e of 
concern either to tta States as a while or to British India 
and the States in comn-n. 

5. The Politic! Secretary will ordinarily attend the 
meetings of the Standing C >m nitce^ an i will consult the 
Committee in framing the agenda for the meetings of the 
Chamber of Princes. 

III. — Regulation regarding the position of minor 
Frinces and Chiefs in the Chamber. 

Ruling Princes and Chiefs of States included in clause 
2, sub-clauses {j) and (ii) of the Constitution, who are minors, 
will not exercise the rights of Membership of the Chamber, 
but may attend meetings of the Chamber by the invitation 
of the Viceroy on ceremorial occasions or in order to wr*tch 
the proceedings of the Chamber. 

Appendices to the first Regulation. 
A. — Rules for the election of the Chancellor . 

1. The election shall be held by ballot in the Cham bar 
upon a day to be appointed by the Viceroy. 

2. Every LVlember and Representative Member, then 
present in the Chamber, shall be entitled to one vote. 

3. Votes shall be recorded upon voting papers to be 
prepared by the Secretary in a form approved by the 
Viceroy, provided that there shall be nothing upoa the 
form to indicate the uame of the Member or Representative 
Member voting or the State which he represents. 



214 BEWA KANTHA DIBECTOBY. 

4. Voting papers need not ba signed. The necessary 
instructions for recording the vote will oe printed up3n e^ch 
voting paper. 

5. When the votes have been recorded, the voting 
papers shall then be collected in a ballot box by the Secre« 
tary who shall then proceed to count the votes recorded 
and to report to the Chamber the names of the two Mem* 
bers in whose favour the largest number of votes have been 
recorded. 

6. Upon the report being made, any Member shall 
be entitled to claim a scrutiny, in which esse the Chamber 
shall appoint a Committee of three Members who shall, 
"With the assistance of the Secretary, recount the votes 
recorded and declaro the result, which shall be final. 

7. Any voting paper which is not filled in, in accord- 
ance with the instructions for recording the vote, shall not 
be taken into account. The number of votes recorded for 
any Member shall not b3 disclosed. 

8. In the event of an equal number of votes being 
recorded for the first two Members, a second ballot shall be 
held between them. 

9. In the event of an equal number of votes being 
recorded for the second and third or more Members, a 
second ballot shall be held between them. 

10. In the case of second ballots, any voting paper 
containing a name other than those of the Members between 
whom the second ballot is held shall not be taken inta 
account. 

11. On the conclusion of the election all voting 
papers shall be destroyed. 

B. — Rules for the election of the Standing Committee. 
1. The election shall be held by ballot in the Chamber 
upon a day to be appointed by the Vic< ro/ after the elecf 
tion of the Chancellor. 



POLITICAL REFORMS-CHAMBER OF PRINCES. 215 

2. Every Member and Representative Member, then 
present in the Chamber, shall be entitled to one vote. 

3. Votes shall be recorded upon voting papers to be 
prepared by the secretary in a form approved by tho 
Viceroy, provided that there shall be nothing in the form 
to indicate the name of the Member or Representative 
Member voting or the State which he represents. 

4. Voting papers need not be signed. The necessary 
instructions for recording the votes will ba printed upoa 
each voting paper. 

5. When the votes have been recorded, the voting 
papers shall then be collected in a ballot box. by the Secre- 
tary who shall then proceed to count tho votes recorded and 
report to the Chamber the names of the Members who, 
having regard to the provisions of Regulation 2, are deemed 
to have been duly elected. 

6. Upon the report being made, any Member shall 
be entitled to claim a scrutiny, in which case the Chambec 
shah appoint a Committee of three Members, who shall^ 
with the assistance of the Secretary, recount the votes. 
recorded and declare the result, which shall ba final. 

7. Any voting paper which is not filled in, in accor- 
dance with the instructions for recording votes, shall not ba 
taken into account. The number of votes recorded for any 

Member shall not ba disclosed. 

8. In the event of an equal number of votes being 
recorded for two or more Members in the case cf a seat 
reserved for Members belonging to a particular geographical 
group of States, a second ballot shall be held between theacu 

S. In the case of second ballots, any voting papers 
containing a name, other than those of the Members bet- 



#1.6 RKWAKANT&A DIRECTORY. 

.ween whom the second ballot is held, shall not be taken 
Into account. 

10. On the conclusion of the election all voting 
papers shall be destroyed. 

(Signed) J. B. WOOD, 

Political Secretary to the Government of India. 



"No. 263— R. dated Delhi, the 8th February 1921. 

In pursuance of clause 13 of the Constitution of the 
Chamber of Princes, His Excellency the Viceroy is pleased 
to make the following Rules for the conduct of business in 
the Chamber of Princes. 

JRvles for the Conduct of Business in the Chamber of Princes. 

1. Ordinary meetings of the Chamber will be held 
once a year at Delhi on a date which will be fixad by the 
Viceroy. The Viceroy has the discretion to convene extra- 
ordinary meetings on his own initiativa or on the sigges- 
tion of one cr more members or representative members of 
the Chamber. 

2. Appointment of a President. — The Viceroy will 
ordinarily preside. When the Viceroy is not present, one 
of the Princes selected by His Excellency will preside, and 
shall have all the powers conferred hy these rules on the 
President. When a Ruling Prince presides he shall have 
only one vote. 

3. Agenda.— The Chamber will ordinarily consider only 
matters included in the agenda, which will be framed under 
the Viceroy's orders by the Political Secretary in consultation 
with the Standing Committee. Any member or representa- 
tive member desiring to propose any subject for inclusion 
intfee agenda for any meeting must give writtea notice of 



POLITICAL BEFOBMS-CHAMBKR OF PRINCES. .tlf 

\' r ■ .:• .'?' r vv 7.7; .' \ ':? 7 * 

bis proposal to the Chancellor and to the Political Secre- 
tary three months before the dat? fixed for the meeting. 
Except with the leave of the President no such proposal 
shall be included in the agenda, unless the provisions of 
this rule have been complied with. 

4. Copy of agenda to be furnished to members.— A.. 
copy of the agenda will be furnished to every member and 
representative member of the Chacobar, if possible two 
months before Hie meeting, and a list of business for eaoh. 
day will be circulated by the Secretary of the Chamber. 

5. Duties of President and points of order. — The- 
President will preserve order, and all points of order will be 
decided by him. 

6. Members to rise when speaking and to address the 
President or Princes collectively. — Every member or represen- 
tative member will rise when he speaks and will address 
President or the Princes collectively. 

7. Members icho cannot speth English. — Speeches wiU 
ordinarily be made in English. In case of a member or 
representative member being unable to express himself in 
English, he may depute another member or representative 
member to read his speech, or it may be taken as read and 
recorded with the proceedings of the Chamber. 

If the latter procedure is desired, a suffieienb number 
of printed copies of the speech should be sent to the 
Secretary of the Chamber, for distribution to the members 
and representative members, two clear days before the day 
fixed for the discussion. 

In special cases explanations may be given in the 
vernacular with the leave of the President 

8. lnterruj tions and explanations.— -When, for th* 
purpose of explanation during discussion, or for any other 

sufficient reason, a member or representative member" ha* 

28 



518 RXWA KAHTHA DIR1CT0RY, 

occasion to ask a question of another member or represen- 
tative m&mber on any matter then under the consideration 
of the Chamber, he will ask the question through the Presi- 
dent. When a member or representative member rises to offer 
an explanation, the speaker must resume his seat until the 
member or representative member offering such an explana- 
tion has finished speaking. Interruptions, except for th9 
purpose of explanation or on a point of order, should be 
avoided. 

9. Resolutions. — All matters included in the agenda 
will be submitted for discussion by the Chamber, and any 
member or representative member may give notice of his 
intention to move a resolution thereon in specified terms. 
Such notice may be given either orally in the Chamber 
during the discussion, or by letter to the Secretary of the 
Chamber. 

10. Resolution to be set doicn in List of Business.— 
As soon as may be convenient after such notice has been 
given, the resolution shall be set down in the List of Busi- 
ness for the day provided that, except with the leave of 
the President, no resolution shall be moved until the expi- 
ration of one day after the day upon which such notice was 
given. 

11. Amendments. — When notice of a resolution has 
been given, any member or representative member may give 
notic3of his intention to move an amendment or amend- 
ments thereto in specified terms. Such notice may be given 
either orally in the Chamber, or by letter to the Secretary 
of the Chamber. 

12. Order of amendments— Amendments will ordi- 
narily be discussed with the resolution to which they refer, 
and in the order of the clause3 (if any) of the resolution, 
provided that, except with the leave of the President, no 
amendment shall ordinarily ba moved of which less than 24 
Jiours' clear notice has been given. 



POLITICAL BEFORMS-CHAMBBR 09 PBINOBS* 219** 

13. President may adjourn discussion of resolution*.— 
Ihe President may, if he thinks fife, adjourn the discussion 
of any resolution in order to allow an amendment to ba 
moved, but no amendment shall be moved or discussed after 
the resolution has been put to the vote. 

14 Reference to Select Committees. — When a resolu- 
tion or any matter is being considered by the Chamber, any 
member or representative member may propose that it m iy 
be referred to a Select Committee to be nominated by a vo e 
of the Chamber. 

15. Composition of Select Committees — A Select Com- 
mittee may, if the Chamber so directs, include persons 
Dot being members or representative members of the Caatn- 
ber whose advice may be required. 

16 Report by Select Committees. — Select Committees 
will present their reports to the Chamber for consideration, 
and any member or representative member may move that 
the report be adopted or rejected, either wholly or in part, 
or may, subject to tie provisions of Rule 12, move amend- 
ments thereto. 

17. Resolutions upon matters not arising out of the 
agenda. — With the leave of the President a resolution may 
also be moved upon a matter not arising out of the agenda. 
The provisions of Rules 9 to 16 shall apply so far as may 
be to a resolution so moved. 

18. Voting. — (1) On every motion before the Cbamber 
the question will be put by the President, and will be 
decided by a majority of votes. 

(2) Votes will be taken by a show of hands. 

19. Voting to be recorded in Book of Proceedings.— 
Where a substantial difference of opinion is disclosed, or 
where any member or representative member so desires, the 
names of members or representative members vothg for, or 



REWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

against, a resolution or an amendment, and of those abs- 
taining from voting, will be recorded in the Book of Pro- 
ceedings. 

20. Submission of proceedings to the Viceroy. — All 
proceedings of the Chamber shall be submitted to the Vice- 
roy. This will ordinarily be done at the end of each session, 
unless any member or representative member desires earlier 
submission. 

21. Proceeedings in camera.— The proceedings of 
the Chamber may, if the President so directs, be held in 
camera. Any member or representative member may m>ve 
the President at a meeting of the Chamber for a direction 
to this effect. 

22. Attendance of Secretary. — The Secretary of the 
Chamber shall be in attendance at every meeting and shall 
be entitled with the leave of the President to address ths 
Chamber upon any specified subject. In case o£ the illness 
or unavoidable absence of the Secretary, his place shall be 
taken by some other person approved by the President. 

23 Attendance of other officers. — With the leave of 
the President, anj other offiser of the Government may attend 
a meeting of the Chamber and may address the Cumojr. 
• upon any specified subject. 

Admission to the proceedings of the Chamber will ba 
by ticket, for which application must ba made to tha 



Secretary. 



(Signed) J. B. WOOD, 
Political Secretary to the Government of India. 






POLITICAL RBFORMS-CHAMBBB OF PRINCES** 22l 

H. E. LORD READING'S SPEECH. 

4th November, 1921* 



l l 



*« Your Highnesses, 

Two months ago, as the representative of His Majesty 
I opened for the first time daring my period of office the 
two great constitutional 'Chambers of the British Indian 
Legislature. To-day it is my pleasant duty to open the 
second session of the Chamber of Princes. In so doing, I 
act as the representative of His Majesty and am privileged 
to convey to you as partners in the Empire his good 
wishes far the success of your deliberations; but I cannot 
forget that as Viceroy I stand in a relation of special inti- 
macy to your Chamber, as I have the honour to be your 
Pesident, and have the right to take part in your discussions. I 
trust that this bond between us may increase the mutual 
esteem and regard that have hitherto characterised the 
relations between tae Viceroy and Princes and which are 
continued on my side, and I hop? also on yours. May our 
association in this Chamber be fruitful of benefit to your 
order, to your subjects, to British India and to the Em- 
pire. That was the fourfold object His &£*je3ty set bafore 
us in his proclamation made when the Chamber was in- 
augurated on his behalf by His Royal Highness the Duke 
of Gonnaught. I kiow of no more fitting aim. Lab us 
pray that we may attain it. 



The scheme for the reorganization of the state troops 
is progressing rapidly. 

The Inspector General, Imperial Service Troop3, with 
a specially selected staff of officers, has already made an ec- 



922 BXWA KANTHA DIRECTORY* 

tensive tour through the States which now maintain Impe- 
rial Service troops, and a number of others which are anxi- 
ous to take advantage of the new proposals. The scheme 
is bassd largely on suggestions made by H. H. the Maha- 
raja of Alwar. He asked Government to start with the 
assumption that in time of emergency all the resources of 
the Indian States in men, money and material, would be 
placed at the disposal of the British Government. Your 
Highnesses are in possession of the first draft of the propo- 
sals, and I think you will all agree that the dominant note 
of the new policy is one of trust, I may add, increased by 
comradeship in battle that was tried and not found wanting. 
Practical experience in working out the scheme has, I 
Understand, suggested some alterations, and the proposals, 
as they now stand, are to be discussed by a Commi fn& of 
Princes and certain of my officers during the present session. 
What we have to aim at, is greater efficiency both in 
organization and in armament, while with a view to give 
your Highness* Trocwps a new sphere of activity, they are 
being offered a definite part in the general scheme of internal 
security. 

PROTECTION FROM PRESS ATTACKS. 

The third question is one, which has, I fear, been giv- 
ing Your Highnesses some anxious thought during the past 
summer. The Press Act is the only statuary weapon we 
possess for the protection of Princes against attacks from 
the press in British India. It is an instrument which was 
devised for our own protection as well as for yours, and it 
has been used for both purposes. My Government has, 
however, decide J after full deliberation, to discard it on 
grounds which have been publicly explained. Your Highnesses 
will realise that it would hive besn difficult to retain for 
the benefit of the members of your order a measure of law 
which was thought unnecessary for His Majesty the King. 
The grant to your Highnesses of protection in another 



POLITICAL RBFOBMS-CHAMBER OF 2RIHCB8. Sfcfc 

form is a matter which will require careful consideration. X 
alluded to the question in my speech at the opening of the 
Houses o£ the Legislature on the 3rl Sepiembar, and £ 
refer to it again to day to give Yonr Highnessess an as u- 
rance that it is still engaging my most eirnssfc attention, 
and, as I observed, it will form the subject of a resolution 
to be moved by H. H. the Maharaja of AAwar during the 
course of the deliberations of your Chamber. I shall look 
forward with the greatest interest to the debate which \ti I 
take place upon the subject, as it will inform my mini and 
will assist me in coming to conclusions as to the course 

that should be followed by the Government of India in th 8 

respect." 

X X X 

NEED FOR REFORMS. 

After referring to the representation of Indian Princes 
in the League of Nations His Excellency continued : — 

" That, Your Highnesses, is reform in one of its 
aspacte, the creation of a new order of things strengthening 
your position and advancing your dignity. But as your h rizon 
widens, new ideas emerge into view. Events are compelling 
the study of the workings of forms of Government other 
; than your own, and tha effects which certain forces seem almost) 
inevitably to produce on the beliefs, the feelings and tha 
aspirations of the great masses o£ mankind. 

That, Your Highnesses, brings us to reform in another 
of its aspects, reform as an answer to the awakened cons- 
ciousness of the people. These forces cannot be bidden to 
halt. They must be faced and dealt with. I know full 
well that you have already reflected deep upon them, and 
that they will continue to engage your attention, ao that 



$24 BBWA KA»™> DIRECTORY., 

when they present themselves to you for solution, yon m*y 
know the answer yon wish to make. 

Reform, as it affects your Highnesses, has two aspect 9, 
one affecting your relations with the British Government in 
India, and the other your relations with your own people. I 
am sure that Your Highnesses will already have realiz?d 
that the place of the Indian States in the India of the 
future is a problem which it is difficult to solve and requires 
much thought It must engage the attention of all Your 
Highnedses. For the present I will merely ask your High- 
nesses to ponder over the problem and to look ahead. We shall 
need your counsel. 

X X X X 

INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION. 

As regards the second aspect of the problem, you 
will remember that my predecessor Lord Chelmsford referred 
to the subject of internal reform in the States in his speech 
at the opening of the Conference in November 1919. That 
advice was given by one who was a sincere well-wisher pf 
your order. I shall not at this early period of my Vice- 
royalty attempt to add to it. I merely remind you of it. 
Lord Chelmsford, though he was so largely responsible for 
the reforms in British India, made no suggestion that you 
should copy them. The time and the phce and the manner 
of change, if change there is to be, are in your hands. But 
the forces with which you have to deal are live forces. They 
need and they deserve careful study, wherever they are at) 
work. May you be guided to deal with them prudently 
and well. 



POLITICAL REFORMS-CHAMBER OF PRINCES. 22$" 

COMPELLING FORCES. 

I have referred in the earlier part of my addre99 to 
you to forces that have arisen that cannot be disregarded. 
but mu«t indeed be considered rather a9 the natural outcome 
of human progress, and which no human agency can ever 
hold back, and it behoves us, I speak of U3, that is yoa, 
the Princes of India, and myself as the representative of ths 
King-Emperor and the head of the Government of India, b«j 
do our utmost so to guide the counsels of those who are at 
the head of affairs in India that we may be privileged to 
do our best, one and all of up, in our own spheres, at our 
own time, and in our own actions, to do above all that? 
which we believe to be right, to persist in it notwithstanding 
that it may be adversely criticised, to ponder over the com- 
ment that may be made, to judge cf all the CDunsels that 
may be given, but in the end to take the burden upoa 
ourselves of doing what we honestly, earnestly and sincerely 
believe to be the right course to be followed/* 




29 



POLITICAL BBFOBMS-INDUN LEGISLATURE. 227~ 

THE COUNCIL OF STATE 

AND 

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY. 

PROCEEDINGS on the occasion of the inauguration of 
the Council of State and the Legislative Assembly. — Delhi. 

9th February 1921. 

THE VICEROY'S SPEECH. 
His Excellency the Governor-General, Lord Chelmsford said :- 

Hon. Members of the Council of State and Members 
of the Legislative Assembly, 

I hava required your attendance here under Section 63 
of the Government of India Act, for an important ceremony. 
The new Indian Legislature which is to be opened to-day i3 
the outcome of the polioy announced by His Majesty's 
Government in August 1917. That announcement has bean 
described as the most momentous utterance in the chequered 
history of India, and I believe that it merits that dessription. 

Bub history, as we hava learnt to know, is a 
continuous process. In human affairs, agin nature, there are 
no absolute beginnings, and however great the changes th tt 
may be compressed into a few crowded year3, they are, to the 
eye of the historian, the inevitable consequences of other 
changes— sometimes but little noticed or understood at the 
time — which have preceded them. Nowhere is this clearer 
than in the record of British rule in India. The Act of 
1919 involved a great and memorable departure from the 
old system of Government. It closed one era ani opened 
another. None the less its most innovating provisions had 
their germ in measure? reaching well back into the last, 
century, and; the purpose and spirit which underlay them 
are those that have throughout guided and inspired the 
policy of the British rule in India. 



H28 OTWA KAJTPHA DIRKCTGBY. 

THE BRITISH POLICY. 

There are those who will dispute this interpretation of 
the character of British policy. In their eyes the real object 
of the British Government has always b3en the retention of 
all genuine power in its own hands, and every step in the 
liberalisation of the structure of Government has been a 
concession tardily and grudgingly yielded to demands which 
Government deemed it impolite wholly to refase. I am con- 
fident that history will not endorse this charge, The histo- 
rian of the future will deteat in his survey of the achieve- 
ments of the British in India many an error and short- 
coming. But he will also recognise that throughout the 
years of their rule one increasing purpose has run, and he 
will do justice to the unprecedented character and colossal 
magnitude of the task which they set themselves. For no 
such task was ever attempted by the Empires of the past. 

In these empires either free institutions had never 
existed or, as in the case of Rome, the growth of empire 
had proved fatal to such libarties as had previously been 
enjoyed by the founders of the empire. T&ere were differ- 
ences, doubtless, in the forms of local administration and in 
the personal privileges of the members of the various peoples 
and races of the State, bub sucbt variations in nowise affected 
thd autocratic character of th9 central Government}. But 
the destinies of India and Britain became linked together 
at a time when in the latter country self-government had 
become firmly established, and it has since baen the constant 
aim of the British Government to extend to India the 
benefits and privileges of her own institutions. 

Were any specific evidenca needed of the truth of 
this proposition, I would appeal to the historic minute of 
JLord Mac*ulay upon the question of the medium of instruc- 
tion in India. His argument that England could not im- 
part the ideas of the Western world, otherwise than in her 
own language, canied with it tremendous consequences. Id 



POLITICAL BBFORMS-INDIAK LIGISI^TURIS. 2 2 A , 

leas familiarity with the literature and thought of English 
historians and teachers that did more than any other single 
cause to mould the minds of educated India in a way that 
inevitably lad to a demand for political development, that 
should imitate the model held out to her, for as one of our 
* own poets has said : •' We must ba free who speak the 
tongue that Shakespeare spake.' * 

THE TASK AND ITS DIFFICULTIES. 

The difficulties which confronted her in suoh a task: 
were indeed formidable. The vast area of the country, the 
number and diversity of its population and tha habits and 
ideas engendered by many centuries of despotic rub were 
obstacles that might well have seemed insuperable even to 
the boldest imagination. In dsaling with them, the methods 
followed by British statesmen have been thos* with which 
the political development of England herself had made 
familar. English self Government was not the fruit of any 
sudden revolution or catastrophic change, but has been built 
up gradually and through centuries of sustained effort. 

The evolution of British policy in India has pursued 
a similar course. The British Government has not attempted 
any dazzling and brilliant but inevitably unstable reconstruc- 
tion. It has been content to advanoa step by step, to adjust* 
its institutions from time to time to the degree of progress 
obtained by the people, and to build up the edifice of 
constitutional Government on tne foundations laid by pre- 
ceding generations, so that of Iudia, under British rule, it 
might be truly said, as has been said of England h3rself, 
that she has been a land where freedom slowly 'broadens 
down from precedent to precedent." 

The history of constitutional developments in India 
under British rule falls into oertaiu fairly well defined stages* 
The first o£ these may be said to have terminated with the 
Act of 1861. During this periol the British Gjyara- 



2^6 ,: • rsBitk : Hisitkk nifeEctoiiY. 

intat ^fere engaged in extending and solidifying their domi* 
nions, in evolvir g order out of the chaos that had supervened 1 
on the break up of the Moghul Empire and in introducing 
a number of great organic reforms — such as the improvement 
of the police and the prisons, the codification o£ the criminal 
law and the establishment of the hierarchy of courts of 
justice and ct a trained civil service. 

ACHIEVEMENT OF ADMINISTRATION*. 

The main achievement of administration was in fact 
the construction and consolidation of the mechanical frame- 
| work of the Government. The three separate Presidencies 
were brought under a common system, British rule was 
extended over much of the intervening spaces, and the legis- 
lative and administrative authority of the Governor-Ganeral 
in Council was asserted over all the provinces and extended 
to all the inhabitants, while, at tha same time, provision was 
made for local needs and local knowledge by the creation or 
recreation of local councils. And it is significant that in 
the act which closed this chapter the principle of associating 
the people of India with the Governimnt of the country 
was definitely recognised. 

The Councils set up by this act were still merely 
legislative committees of the Government, bit the right of 
the public to be heard and the duty of tbe executive to 
defend its measures were acknowledged, and Indians were 
given a share in the work of legislation. The second stacre 
terminated with the Act of 1892. The intervening period 
had witnessed substantial and many sided progress. Universities 
had bsen established, secondary education had made oreat 
strides; and Municipal and District Boards had boon created 
in the major provinces. A limited bat important section of 
Indian opinion demanded a further advance, and the justice 
cf this demand was recognised by the British Government 
in tie Act of 1892. 



POLITICAL REFORMS-INDIAN LEGISLATURE. #31 

This act conferred on the Councils the right of asking 
questions and of discussing the Budget, and to this extend 
admitted that their functions ware to be mora than purely 
legislative or advisory. Bat its nost notable innovation, 
was the adoption of the elective principle. It is trjia that* 
technically all the non-official members continued to be nominated, 
but inasmuch as the recommendations of the nominating 
bodies came to be accepted as a matter of course, the fact of 
election to an appreciable proportion of the non-official seats 
Wis firmly established., 

INDIAN ELEMENT IN COUNCILS. 

The Act ot 1861 had recognised the need for including 
an Indian eiement in the legislative councils. The Act o£ 
1892 went further : it recognised in principle the right of 
the Indian people to choose its own representatives on the 
Councils. The third stage will always be associated with 
the names of Lord Morle y and Lord Minto. The experience 
of tae reforms of 1892 had been on the whole favourable. 

The association of the leaders of the non-official public 
in the management of public affairs had afforded an outlet 
for natural and legitimate aspirations and some degree of 
education in the art of Government. But the impulses! 
which had led to the reforms of 1892, continuad to operate* 
and they were reinforced by external events, such as the 
Russo- Japanese war. Important classes were learning to 
realise their own position, to estimate for thamselves their 
own capacities and to compare their claims for equality of 
citizenship with those of the British race. India was in 
fact developing a national self-consciousness. 

The Morley Minto reforms were a courageous and 
sincere effort to adjust the structure of the Government to 
these changes. The legislative councils ware greatly enUrgei, 
the official majority was abandoned in the local councils, and 
the principle of election was legally admitted. No less 



532 ' BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY, 

significant were the alterations made in the functions of the* 
Councils. These were now empowered to discuss the Budget, 
at length, to propose resolutions on it and to divide upon 
them, ancl not only on the Budget, but in all matters of 
public importance resolutions might be moved and divisions. 
I taken. 

ANTICIPATIONS NOT FULFILLED. 

It Was hoped by the authors that around this constitu- 
tion conservative sentiment would crystallise and that fo* 
many years no further shifting of the balance of power 
would be necessary. These anticipations hava not been 
fulfilled, and from the vantage point of our later experience 
we can now see that this was inevitable. The equilibrium, 
temporarily established was of a kind that could not for long 
be maintained. The forces which had led to the introduction 
of these reforms continued to gain in intensity and volume 
and the demand of educated Indians for a larger share ia 
the Government of their country grew year by year more* 
insistent, and flhis demand could find no adequate satisfaction 
within the framework of the Morley-Minto constitution. 

This constitution gave Indian* much wider opportunities 
for the expression of their views and greatly increased their 
power of influencing the policy of Government and its 
administration of public business. But the element of 
responsibility was entirely lacking. The ultimate decisba 
rested in all cases with the Government, and the Councils 
were left with no functions save that of criticism. The 
principle of autocracy, though much qualified, was still 
maintained, and the attempt to band it with the constitu- 
tionalism of the West could but postpone for a short period 
the need for reconstruction on more radical lines. 

'CONCLUSION ARRIVED AT. 

Such then was the position with which my Govern- 
ment was confronted in the years 1916 1917. The conclusion 



*fc which we arrived wap that British policy must seek A 
upw point) of departure, a fresh prientation. On ths lines of 
the Morley-Mmto reforms there could be no farther advance. 
That particular line cf development had been carried to the 
furthest limit of which it admitted, and the only farther 
change of which the system was susceptible would have mad* 
the legislative and administrative acts of an irremovable 
executive entiiely anuejmble to the elected councils, and would ' 
lavo resulted in a disastrous deadlock. 

The executive would havo remained responsible for 

the government of ti*e country, bub w^uld h%ve lacked the 

power to secure thq measures necsssary for the discharge of 

that responsibility. The solution which finalW couamenied 

itself to us is embodied, in principle, in the declaration whiQh 

His Majesty's Govarnment, in full agreement with us, made 

in August, 1917. By that declaration thegradaal develop nent 

<of self-governing institutions, with a view to the progressive 

realization ot responsible Government, was declared to be 

the goal towards which the polioy of Hi3 Majesty's 

Government was to ba directed. The increasing association 

of the people of India with the work o£ G vernment had 

always been the aim of the British Government. In that 

sense a continuous thread of connection links together the 

Act of 1861 and the declaration of August 1917. In the 

last analysis the latter is only the most reoeit and most 

memorable manifestation of a tendency that has been operative* 

throughout the British rule. Bat there are changes of degree* 

so great as to be changes of kind, and this is one of them. 

THE DECLARATION. 

For the first time the principle of autocracy, which 
had not been wholly discarded in all earlier reforms*, was 
definitely abandoned, the conception of the British Govern^ 
ment as a benevolent despotism was finally renounced, and in 
its place was substituted that of a guiding authority whose 
role it would be to assist the stsjs of India ale n/ the road 
* 30 " " i '- "" ' ' ^ ~ ■'■■■ ' - '--- 



331 BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

that the fulness of time would lead to complete self-govern- 
anent within the Empire. In the interval required for the 
accomplishment of this task certain powers of supervision 
and, if need be, of intervention, would be retained and 
substantial steps towards redeeming the pledges o£ the 
Government were to be taken at the earliest moment possible. 
I shall not attempt to recount in detail the processes by 
which subsequently the new policy wa3 given definite formal 
expression in the Act o£ 1919. They are set out in the 
documents, all of which have been published. In M*y, 1915, 
I took up first the question of constitutional reform. 
Throughout that year, and the firsts half of 1917, 1 pressed 
apon His Majesty's Governmeub the necessity for a declara- 
tion of policy on lining the objective of Britieh rule in India 
and tbesteps to be taken in the direction of that objective, 
feeling sure that such a declaration could only emanate 
satisfactorily from the highest authority of . the Enpire. In 
August, 1917, that declaration was m*de, and in November 
£ha Secretary of State, on my invitation, Cim3 to India to 
take up the task of recommending with myself, to His 
Majesty's Government the step3 to be taken in falfilanno of 
the declaration. Without that) visit 1 m*ke b >Id to 3ay 
the Government of India might] still be exsuaagiag dasp-ttahes 
with His Majesty's Government on this subj.cj. No two 
men could have worked together on sush a task wibh greater 
fcarmony and goodwill Differences there may hive been, 
but where and when h*va there not been differences in 
such a work. Oar proposals and the reasons for them are 
«et out in the report on Indian Constitutional Reforms. 
They have bjen widely criticised and in soma respecbs they 
iiave been modified by Parliament, but the cardinal feature 
of our scheme, now generally known as the system 6f 
diarchy, is the basis of the Act of 1919, 
THE WORTHY GIFT. 
It will be for future generations to pass the final 
judgment on our £cheme and I shall not endeavour to anfci- 



POLITICAL REFORMS-INDIAN LEGISLATURE. 23$* 

cipate the verdict, but certain claims I do advance. The* 
scheme does represent an honest effort to give effect in the 
fullest and most complete form possible, to the declaration 
of August, IS 17. Neither here, nor in Fngland, has there 
been any attempt to whittle down or nullify the pledges 
then given, nor can the charges of failing to consult Indian 
opinion be laid at our doore. At every stage we h&ve courted* 
publicity, the proposals in the report on Indian Constitutional 
jReforms were communicated to the public at the earliest* 
moment possible, the criticism which they elicited were 
transmitted to the Secretary of State in published despatches, 
anb every opportunity was given to all parties to lay their 
views before the joint Committee, and evary criticism, every 
suggestion, every alternative plan was fully weighed and 
explored. We left nothing undone thab in our judgment 
might conduce to the succesful salution of the great work 
which we had undertaken. According to our lights we have 
striven to make the gift, which we had to bestow, worthy o£ 
Britain and worthy cf India, and now His Majesty the 
King-Emperor, who has given so many proofs of his concern 
for the welfare of India, has bean pleased to set the seal on 
our labours of the last four years by deputing His Royal 
Highness the Duke ofConuaught to open, on his beha'f, the 
new Indian Legislature. 

His Royal Highness is no stranger to India. Some 
five years of his life were passed in this country. Ha has 
himself been a member cf the Indian Legislative Council, he 
knows the people o£ India and their problems, and his 
interest in their w,ell being has never flagged. We welcome 
him, not only as the representative of His Majesty the 
King-Emperor, but as an old and proved friend of India* 
And now it is my privilege and pleasure to ask His R3yal 
Highness to inaugurate the New Assemblies of the Council 
of State and Legislative Assembly. 



POLITICAL REFORMS-INDIA* LEGISLATURE. 23? 

THE ROYAL MESSAGE. 

(THROUGH ASSOCIATED PRESS.) 

Delhi, February 9. 

His Royal Highness the Duke of Connaught read the 
following message from His Imperial Mijesfcy the King* 
Emperor to the Indian Legislature, of which he was the 
bearer :— 

" Little more than a year has elapsed sinca I gave 
my assent to the Act) of Parliament to set upacsnscitutiioa 
for British India. The intervening time has been fully 
occupied in perfecting the necessary machinery, and you are 
now at the opening of the first session of the Lsgislatures 
which the Act established. 

" On this auspicious occasion I desire to send you 
and the members of the Provincial Councils my congratula- 
tions and my earnest good wishes for success in your 
labours and theirs. For years, it may be for generations, 
patriotic and loyei Indians have dream a i of Swaraj for 
their Mother-land. To-day you tnve the beginning of Swaraj 
within my widest scope and ample opportunity tor progress 
to the liberty which my other Dominions enjoy. 

" On you, the first representatives of the people in the 
new Councils, there rests a very special responsibility. For 
on you it lies by the conduct of your business and the justice 
of your judgments to convince the world of the wisdom of 
this great constitutional change. 

" But on you it also lies to remember the many 
millions of your fellow countrymen who are not yet qualified 
for a share in political life, to work for their uplifbmeub and 
to cherish their interests as your own. 



238 BSWAKAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

f< I shall watch your work with unfailing sympathy and 
with a resolute faith in your determination to do yourdutjr 
to India and the Empire." 

THROUGH THE CENTURIES. 

Proceeding, His Boyal Highness said: — 

" As ycu know, it had been the intention of His 
Majesty to send the Prince of Wales, the Heir to the Throne, 
With his greetings and his authority, to open the Chambers 
of the new Indian legislator. Events did not permit of his 
coming, and I received His Majesty's command to perform 
these functions en his behalf. In me the King selected the 
eldest member of the Royal House anrf the only surviving 
son of Queen Victoria, whose love and care for Indai will 
ever live in its people's memory. I have myself a deep 
affection for India, having served it for years and made many 
friends among its Princes and leaders. It is thus then no 
common pleasure that I am here to receive you on this 
memorable occasion. 

" Throughout the centuries Delhi has witnessed the 
pomp and ceremony of many historic assemblages. Two, at 
least, of these are remembered by most of you. Twenty 
years ago I took part in that brilliant concourse which 
celebrated the accession of my late brother King Edward 
the Seventh. Nine years later, amid circumstances of 
unforgettable splendour, King George the Fifth and his 
Queen received in person the homage of the Princes and 
peoples of India. 

" Our ceremony to-day may lack the colour and romance 
b£ the gathering I have mentioned, though ib does nob yield 
to them in the sincerity of its loyalty. Bat ib strikes a 
new and different note. It marks the awakening of a great 
nation to the power of its . nationhood. In the annals of the 
World there is not, so far as I know, an exact parallel for 
the constitutional changa which this function initiates. There 
is certainly no parallel for the method of that change. 



POLITICAL REFORMS-INDIAN LEGISLATURE. 239 

A FREE AND PRICELESS GIFT. 

"Political freedom has often been won by revolution, by 
tumult, by civil war, at the price of parce and public safety. 
How rarely has it been the free gift of one people to another 
in response to a growing wish for greater liberty and to the 
growing evidence of fitness for its enjoyment ! Such, however, 
is the position of India today, and I congratulate most 
warmly those of you, old in the service of your Motherland, 
who have striven through good report and ill, for the first 
instalment of that gift and to prove India worthy of it. I 
trust that you, and those who take up your mantles after 
you, will move faithfully and steadfastly along the road 
which is opened to-day. 

•• When India became a dependency of the British Orown r 
she passed under a British guardianship which has laboured 
with glorious results to protect India from the consequences 
of her own history at home and from the complications of 
international pressure abroad. Autocratic, however, as was 
the Government then inaugurated, it was based on the 
principles laid down by Her late Majesty Queen Victoria in 
that famous Proclamation of 1858, of which the key-note is 
contained in the following passage :— " In their prosperity 
will be our strength, in their contentment our security, and 
in their gratitude our beat reward." 

A SUGGESTION REPUDIATED. 

f< And though there have been occasions on which the 
tranquility of this great country fc has been endangered by 
disturbances and disorders which hav3 necessitated the use 
of military force, speaking on behalf of His Majesty and 
with the assent of his Government I repudiate in the most* 
emphatic manner the idea that the administration of India 
has been, or ever can be based on principles of force or 
terrorism. All Governments are liable to be oeafroated with. 



$#> , ^f^KA^TB^ PJ^CTO**., 



situations, which can bo dealt with only by measures outside 
the ordinary law, but the employment of such measures is 
sobject- to clear and definite limitations, and His Majesty's 
Government have always insisted, and will always insist, on 
the observance of these limitations, as jealously in the case 
<jf India as in that of England herself. 

€< As His Excellency the Viceroy has observed, the 
principle of autocracy has all been abandoned. Its retention 
would not have been declared by her late Majesty Queen Victoria 
to be the aim of British Rule and would have been incon- 
sistent with the legitimate demands and aspirations of the 
Indian people and the stage of political development which 
they have attained. * 

A PROBLEMATICAL FUTIJRE. 

Henceforward, in an ever-increasing degree, India will 
have to bear her own burdens. They are not light. The' 
times which have seen the cDnception and birth of the new 
constitution are full of trouble. The war which ended two 
years ago has done more than alter the boundaries of nations. 
The confusion which ib brought in its train will abate in 
time, but the world has not passed unchanged through the 
fire. New aspirations have awakened, new problems have 
been created and old ones invested with a stinging urgency. 
India has escaped the worst ravages of the war and its 
sequels and is thus in some respects better fitted than many 
other countries to confront the future. Her material 
resources are imrepaired, her financial system is sound, and 
her industries are ready for rapid expansion. But she can- 
not hope to escape altogether the .consequences of the 
world-wide struggle. The countries of the earth are linked 
together as never before. A contagious ferment of scepticism 
and unrest is seething everywhere in th a minds of men, and 
its workings are plainly visible in India. , , 



POLITICAL REFORMMNDIAN LEGISLATURE. 241 

She has other probletas peculiarly her owrr, Inexperience 
in political methods will be irksome at times. The electorates* 
will have to be taught their powers and responsibilities, An<$ 
difficulties which are negligible in smaller and more homo* 
gencus c untries will arise in handling questions of religion* 
and race and custom. 

LABOURS WHICH AWAIT YOU. 

Gentlemen of the Indian Legislature? — Such are the^ 
labours which await you. They will have to be carried en 
tinder the eyes of a watching world, interested but not 
uncritical, of sister nations who welcome you itito their 
partnership in the British Empire, of that wider council of 
nations which look to India as the future guide of the- 
unknown forces of Asia. Year individual responsibility is* 
great. You may perhip* be apprehensive th*t the arena 
fcr practical issues of immediate moment will bs rather the- 
Provincial Councils than the Central Legislature. You may 
feel that the ministers in the provinces will be in closer 
touch with popular causes and have larger opportunities o£ 
public service. 

But this is true in a very* limited sen3e. It is the 
clear intention of the Act of 19i9 that the p>licy and 
decisions of the Government of India should be influenced 
to an extent incomparably greater than they have been in 
the past by the views of the Indian Legislature, and the* 
Government will give the fullest possible effecf, co s .tent 
with their own responsibilities to Parliament, to this principle 
of a new constitution. From now onwards your influence 
will extend to every sphere of the Central Government. Itv 
will be felt in every part of its administration. You ara 
concerned not with the Provinces, but with all British India, 
and statesmanship could not ask for a nobler field of exer- 
cise. Upon the manner in which your influence is exerted, 
upon the wisdom and foresight displayed in your deliberations^ 
upon the spir?t in fitfhich you approach your great task, 
31 



242 RHWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

will deperd the progress of India towards the goal of 
complete self-government. 

FUNCTIONS OF THE CHAMBERS. 

To ensure, so far as political machinery can ensure* 
that the legislature is fitly equipped for those lofty duties, 
two Chambers have been constituted. In the Council 
of State it has be9n the intention of Parliament to create 
a true Senate, a body of elder statesmen endowed with mature 
knowledge, experienc3 o£ the works, and consequent sobriety 
of judgment. According to the policy announc3d by His 
Majesty'3 G3V3rnment its functions will b9 to exercise & 
revising, but not a a over-riding, influence for caution and 
moderation, and to review and adjust the acts of the 
larger Chamber. 

To the Assembly it will fall to voice more directly 
the needs of the people. Soldiers and traders, owners of land 
and dwellers in cities, Hindu and Mahomedan, Sikh and 
Christian, all classes and communities will h*ve in it theic 
share of representation. Eich class and each community 
can bring it3 own contribution, its own special knowledge 
to the common deliberations. Aid may I say ia passing 
that help will be expected from the representatives of the 
British non-official community. They have done great service 
to the trade and industry of Iadia iu the past. Will they 
now, wilh their special experience of representative institutions 
in theic own land, land their powerful aid in building up 
India's political life and practice ? 

THE STRUGGLE OF PROGRESS. 

In a Legislature thus composed it is both inevitable 
and right that strong diffirenca of opinion ani aims should 
manifest themselves. Struggle is a cjniitioa of progress ia 
the natural wo:U. Policies is, in face, the pcooiss of the 
iash of wills, sympathies, and interests striving for adjust- 
ment in the sphere of legislation and government. Bib it 
is the great virtue of representative insiUutious that they 



P0LI1ICAL BB70BMS-IKDIAN LEGISLATURE. 243* 

fend to replace interests by reasoned discussion, compromise! 
toleration aud the mutual respect for honorable opponents. 
The extent to wh : ch a body of law-makers shows itself 
capable of controlling passion and prejudice is the measure 
of its capacity for enduring success. 

For these reflections I make no apology. They must 
already have been present to your minds, bub they const! tute 
the strongest plea for what all friends of India most desire 
to see greater unity of purpose anong her various commu- 
nities. In all your deliberations let there be a conscious 
striving for unity in essentials, that unity which has been 
lacking in India in the past, but may y?b become, if 
ateadily nurtured, her greatest strength. 

Gentlemen of the Indian L9gislature,-Hitherto I have 
spoken of your duti33. Let me close with a word on your 
privileges. On )ou, who have been elected the first members 
of the two Chambers, a signal honour has fallen. Your names 
will go down to history as those whom India chose to lead 
the van of her march towards constitutional liberty. I pray 
that) success will attend you, and that the result of your 
labours will be worthy of the trust that India has repose! 
in you. 

A PERSONAL NOTE. 

\our Excellency. — You have approached the end of 
your Viceroyalty. In almost every country ol the world 
the years just passed have been critical and anxious, and in 
India no less. And I know well the vast and well nich 
overwhelming anxieties which you have been called upon to 
face. I know well the high sense of duty which has always 
prompted you, the single purpose which has possessed you, 
the never failing courage which has sustained you. 

From the first moment you held one special object in 
Tiew. You determined, God willing, to lead India to a 
definite stage ia her constitutional advancement. Through 
all distraction* and difficult es youheli to that determination, 



24Q f BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

*nd to day when your thoughts are turning to the Home- 
land and to the hour when your mantle will pas3 to other 
shoulders, wh^a you think regretfully, as all men must ia 
such an hour, of all the things yoa would have wished to 
<Io, had fortune been more kind, still a? you look round this 
assembly, Your Exc3lleacy must) surely feel this: cl I have 
striven, and in t lis I have won/* 

I wish to offer my warm congratulations to yon on 

the translation to-day into life and reality of that far-seeing 

scheme of political prog ess of which you and the Secretary 

of State were the authors. It muse be no small pride to 

a statesman who has been directing the destinies of India 

during these d.fficult years that he sees, while still in office, 

the foundations securely laid of that edifice which he helped 

to pan with infinite care, in the face of much misunderstanding, 

and yet w th the full assurance of a nation's future gratitude. 

I trust that Your Excellency's successor and tha devoted 

/public servants, who will be his agents and advisers, wiil find 

in the new Indian Legislature an alleviation of labour, a 

faihful m rror ot India's needs and withes, and a trusty 

i link between themselves and the vast millions under their 

-care. And now I declare duly open tha Council of State 

-and the Legislative Assembly constituted under the GjVtfru- 

.merit of India Act, 1919. 

LURY THE PAST. 

Gentlemen, — I have finished my part in to day's official 
proceedings. May i claim your patieaee *md forbearance 
while i say a lew words of a p^r3 >ti*i nx&ara* Sine* I 
landed I have ielfr around me bitterness and estrange (neat* 
b tvveen tho39 who have been and should- be frienls. The 
shadow of A mritsar has lengthened over the fair face o£ 
..India. 1 know how dtep ia the concern felt by His Majesty 
tht> King Emperor ac the terrible chapter of events ia th? 
JPanjab. 



POLITICAL REFORMS-INDIA* LEGISLATURE. 24S 

No one can deplore those events more intensely than 
I do myself. I have reached a time of life when I most 
desire to heal wounds and to reunite those who have beea 
disunited. In what must be, I fear, my last visit to the 
India I love so well, here in the new capital, inaugurating a> 
new constitution, I am moved to make you a personal 
appeal, put in the simple words that oaia from my heart, 
cot to be coldly and critically interpreted. 

My experience tells me that misunderstanding* usually 
maan mistakes on either side. As an old friend of India I 
appeal to you all, British and Indians, to bury abng with 
the dead past the mistakes and misuoderatandiuga of the past, 
to forgive where ycu have to forgive, and to join hands and 
to work together to realise the hopes that arise from to day/* 

X XX x 

EXPRESSION OP THANKS. 

Mr. A. P. Muddiman, the President of the Council 
of State, wore a damask robe trimmed with gold over a 
black velvet suit. He was in similar costume to that of the 
Speaker in full dress at State functions. In thanking His 
Royal Highness Mr. Muddiman said : — 

" May it please Your Royal Highness, 

We, His Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, 
who are members of the Council of State, beg leave to 
request that Your Rjval Highness may b3 pleased to offer 
our humble thanks to His Majesty the King Enparor for 
the gracious message which has baen conveyed t^ the Council 
of State by Your Royal Highness and our profound grati- 
tude for your preseLca on this most auspicious occasion." 

Mr. E. Whyte, the President of the Assembly, who 
was also robed in gown and wig, also thanked the Duke oa 
behalf of the Assembly and the proceedings concluded. 

The Duke and the Viceroy left under a Royal salute. 



^POLITICAL BEFOBMS-PREVIOUS ROYAL PROCLAMATION^ $&£ 

QUEEN VICTORIA'S 
PROCLAMATION of 1858. 

•' Proclamation by the Queen in Council to the Princes, 

VJuefs and Peoples of India. 

'* Victoria, by the Grace o£ God, of the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the Colonies and 
Dependencies thereof in Europe, Asia, Africa, America and 
Australia, Queen, Defender of the Faith, 

" Whereas, for diverse weighty reasons, We hare 
resolved, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords, 
spiritual and temporal, and Commons in Parliament 
assembled, to take upon ourselves the Government of the 
Territories ia India heretofore administered in trust for Us 
i>y the Honourable East India Company, 

Now, therefore^ We do by these presents, notify and 
declare that, by the advice and consent aforesaid, we have 
taken upon Ourselves the said Government; and We hereby 
<*all upon all our subjects within the said Territories to be 
faithful, and to bear true allegiance to Us, Our Heirs and 
Successors, and to submit themselves to the authority of 
those whom, we may, hereafter from time to time, see fit 
to appoint to administer the Government of Oar said 
Territories in our name and on our behalf* 

11 We hereby announce to the Native Princes o£ India 
that all Treaties and Engagements made with them by or 
under the authority of the Honourable Easto India Company 
are by Us accepted, and will be scrupulously maintained, and 
We look for the like observance on their part, 

41 We desire no extension of our present territorial 
Possessions ; and while we will permit no aggression upoa 



248 BEWA KAHTHA DIRECTORY. 

our Dominions or our Bights to be attempted with impu- 
nity, We shall sanction no incroaehmenfc on thosa of others. 
We will respect the rights, dignity and honour of Native 
Princes as our own ; and We desire that they as well as our 
own subjects, should enjoy that Prosperity and that Social 
Advancement which can only be secured by internal Peace- 
and Good Govern rnen\ 

" We hold ourselves bound to the Natives of our 
Indian Territories by the same Obligations of Duty which 
bind Us to all our other subjects; and these obligations, by the 
Blessing of Almighty God, we shall faithfully and conscien- 
tiously fulfil. 

11 Firmly relying Ourselves on the truth of Christianity, , 
and acknowledging with gratitude the solace of Religion, we 
disclaim alike the right and the desire t) impose our 
conviction on any of our subject?. We declare it to be our 
Royal Will and Pleasure that none be in anywise favoured, 
none molested or disquited by reason of their Religious Faith 
or Observances, but that all shall alike enjoy the equal and 
impartial protection of the Law ; and We do strictly charge 
and enjoin all those who may be in authority under U* that 
they abstain from all interference with the Religious Relief 
or worship of Our Subjects, on pain of our highest Displeasure, 
and it is our further Will that so far as may be, Our Subjects, 
of whatever Race or Creed, be freely and impartially admitted 
to offices in our service the duties of which they may be 
qualified by their education, ability and integrity, duly to 
discharge. 

We know, and respect, the feelings of attachment with 
which the Native States of India regard the lands inherited 
by them from their ancestors ; and We desire to protect 
them and all rights connected therewith, subjeot to the 
equitable demands of the State, and We will that generally 
in framing and administering the Law due regard be paid to 
the ancient Rights, Usages and Customs of Iudia. 



POLITICAL KEFOBMSr-PBBVIOUS BOTAL PROCLAMATIONS. 2490 

u When, by the Blessing of the Providence, internal 
Tranquility shall be" restored, it is our earnest D:sire to 
stimulate the peaceful Industry of India, to promote works 
of public Utility and Improvement, and to administer its 
Government for the benefit of all our subjects, resident 
therein. In their prosperity will be our Strength, in their 
contentment Our Security, and in thair gratitude our Best 
JReward. 

11 And may the God of all power grant to Us and thosa 
in authority under Us, strength to carry out these Our 
wishes for the gocd of Our People." 




32 



550 BEWA KANTHA DIBECTORT. 

BY THE QUEEN. 

A PROCLAMATION. 

VICTORIA, R. 

WHEREAS an Act has boen passed in the present 
Session of Parliament, intituled " An Act to enable Har 
Most Gracious Majesty to make su addition to the Royal 
Style and Titles appertaining to tho Imperial Grown of the 
United Kingdom had its Dep^nd-ncie^/' which A,ct r93it.es 
that, by the Act for the Union of Great Britain and Ireland, 
it was provid-d that after such Union the Royal Style and 
Titles appertaining to the I nparial Grown of the U ited 
Kingdom and its Dependencies should be such as His 
Majesty by His Royai Proclamation under the Great Seal 
cf the United Kingdom should be pleased to appoint : 
and which Act also recites that, by virtue of the said Acb v 
and cf a Royal Proclamation under the Great Sail, dated 
the 1st day of January 1801, Our p^ent Style and Titles 
are « VICTORIA., by the Grace of God, of the United 
Kingd m of Great Britain and Ireland, QUEEN", Defender 
of the Faith:' and which Act also recites that, by the Act 
for the better government of 1 1 iia, it was enacted that the 
Government of India, theretofore vested in the Eist India 
Company in trust for Us should becoma vested in Us, and 
that India should thenceforth be governed by Us and in 
Our name, and that it is expedient that there should be a 
recognition of the transfer of government so in tie by means 

of an addition to be made in xr Style aai Titles : And 
which Act, after the s-dd r:e.tals, enacts t.iat it soall be 
lawful for Us. with a view to <uch ree >gnifcion as aforesaid, 
of the transfer of the Government of Iniia, by xc Royal 
Proclamation under the Grest Seal of the United Kingdom, 
to make such addition to the Style and Titles at present 
appertaining to the Imperial Crown of th9 United Kingdom 
and its Dependencies as to LJs may seam ineeo; We nava 
thought Ho, by and with ttie advioe of Oar Pcvy Council, to 



POLITICAL REFOBMS-PBEVIGUS BOYAL PKOCLAMATIONS. 251 

appoint and declare and We do hereby, by and with the saipe 
advice, appoint and declare that henceforth so far as conveniently 
may be, on all pccasions and in all instruments wherein Oar 
Style and Titles are used, save and except nil Charters, 
Commissions, Letters Patent, Grants, Writs, Appointments, 
and other like instruments not extending in their operation 
beyond the United Kingdom, the following addition shall be 
made to the Style ana Titles at present appertaining to the 
Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its Dependencies; 
that is to say, in the Latin tongue in these words: c< INDUE 
IMPERA.TRIX" And in the Eoglisn tongue in these 
words : « EMPRESS OF INDIA." 

And Oar will and pleasure farther 13, that the said 
addition shall not; be made in the Commissions, Charters > 
Letters Patent, Grants, Writs, Appointments, and other 
like instruments, hereinbefore specially excepted. 

And Our will and pleasure further is, that all gold, 
silver, and copper moneys, now carrent and lawful moneys of 
the United Kingdom, and all gold, silver and copp3r moneys 
which shall, on or after this day, be coined by Our authority 
with the like impressions, shall, notwithstanding such 
addition to lr Style and Titles, ba deemed and taken to 
be current and lawful moneys of the siid United Kingdom, 
and further that all moneys coined for and issued in any 
of the Dependencies of the siid United Kingdom, an I 
declared by Oar Proclamation to be current and lawful 
money of such Dependencies respectively bearing Oar Style 
or Titles, or any part or parts thereof, and all moneys which 
shall hereafter be coined and issued according to such 
Proclamation, shall notwithstanding such addition, continue 
to be lawful and current money of such Dependencies 
respectively, until Our pkasure shall be further declared 
thereupon. 

Given at Our Court at Windsor the twenty-eighth day 
of April one thousand eight hundred and sevanty-six in tha 
thirty-ninth year of Oar .Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. 



252 ftEWA EAMTHA IflRBCTOBY. 

Queen Victoria's Message to the 
Imperial Darbar of 1877* 

THE VICEROY LORD LYT TON'S ADDRESS. 
Princes and People ol India, 

lb is now ray pleasing duty to communicate to you 
the gracious message which the Queen, Your Enpress, has 
to-day addressed to you in Her own Rjyal and Imperial 
name. These are the words of the telegraphic message which 
I have this morning received from Her Majesty. 

" We, Victoria by the Grace of God, of the United 
Kingdom, Queen Empress of India, send through our Viceroy 
to all our officers, Civil and Military, and to all Princas, 
Chiefs and Peoples now at Delhi assembled, our Royal and 
Imperial Greetings, and assure them of the deep interest 
and earnest affection with which we regard the people of 
our Indian Empira, We hava witnessed with heart-felb 
satisfaction the reception which they have accords J So our 
baloved Son, and have be9n touched by the evidence of their 
loyalty and attachment to our H>us9 and Throne. We trust* 
thfci the present occasion may tend to unite in bonds of yet 
closer affection ourseiv.s and our subjects, that from the 
highest to tae humblest all may £ael tuat uictar our Rule, 
the great principles of liberty, equity and justice are S3cured 
to them; and that to promote t'aeir hippiness to add to 
their prosperity and advance their welfire, are the ever 
present aims and objects of our Empire. 



POLITICAL REFORMS-PREVIOUS ROYAL PROCLAMATIONS. 253 

King Edward YIPs Message to 
the Darbar of 1903, 

11 It gives ma amah pleasure to sand a massage of 

greeting to my Indian paople on tha solemn occasion when 
they are celebrating my Coronation. Only a smUl number of 
the Indian Princes and Representatives were able to ba 
present at the ceremony which took plaaa in Lon ion ; and 
I accordingly instructed my Viceroy and G>varno:* General to 
hold a gre*t Dirbir at Delhi, in order to afford an oppor- 
tunity to all the Indian Princes, Chiefs and Peoples, and 
to all the officials of my Government to commemorate this 
auspicious event. Ever since my visit to India in 1875, I 
have regarded that Country and its Peoples with deep affection; 
and I am conscious of their earnest and loyal devotion to 
my House and Throne. Daring recent years m *ny evidences 
of their attachment have reached me ; and my Indian Troops 
have rendered conspicuous services iu the Wars and Victories 
of my Empire. 

" I confidently hop9 that my belovai son, tha Prince of 
Wales and the Princess of Wales, may before bag ba able to 
make themselves personally acquainted with India, a country 
which I have always desired that they should saa, an 1 which 
they are equally anxious to visit. GUdly would t h%ve coma 
to India upon this eventful occasion myself, hid that baan 
found possible. I have however sant my dear Broohar, the 
Duke of Connaught, who is already so wall kaowa in India, 
in order that my Family may ba represented at tha Caramon/ 
held to celebrate my Coronation. 



254 BKWA KANTHA DIRECTOBY. 

"My desire, since I succeeded to the Throne of my 
Revered Mother, the late Qaeen Victoria, the First Empress 
of India, has been to maintain unimpared the same principles 
of humane and equitable administration which secured for her 
in so wonderful a degree the veneration and affection of Her 
Indian subjects. To all my Feaudafcories and Subjects 
throughout India, I renew the assurance of my regard for 
their liberties, of respect for their dignities and rights, of 
interest in their advancement, and of devotion to their welfare, 
which are the supreme aim and object of my rule, and which, 
under the blessing of Almighty Qod, will lead to the 
increasing prosperity of my Indian Enpire and the greater 
happiness of its People/' 




POLITICAL REFORMS-PREVlOtS ROYAL PROCLAMATIONS. 255 

King Edward VU's Proclamation. 

The following Proclamation was issued by King Edward 
VII, on the occasion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of Queen 
Victoria's Proclamation of 1853, on 1st November 1908: — 

" It is now fifty years since Queen Victoria, My 
beloved Mother and My August Predecessor on the Throne of 
these realms, for diverse weighty reasons, with the advice 
and consent of Parliament, took upon he?self the Government 
of the Territories thereof or administered by the East Irdia 
Company, I deem this a fitting anniversary on which to 
greet the Princes and Peoples of India in commemoration 
of the exalted task then solemnly undertaken. 

" Half a csntury is bub a brief space in your long 
annals, yet this half century that ends to day will stand 
amid the floods of your historic age3 a far-shining land mark. 
The proclamation ef the direct supremacy of the Crown 
sealed the unity of Indian G>vernmeni; and opened a new 
era. The journey was arduous, and the advance may have 
sometimes seemed slow, but the incorporation of many 
strangely diversified communities, and some 330 millions of 
the hamm raca unler British guidance and control has 
proceeded steadfastly and without a p ; iuse. 

" We survey oar labours of the past century with a 
cle^r gazi and a good conscience. 

"Difficulties such as attend all human rule in every 
age and place have risen up from day to day. They have been 
faced by the servants of the British Crown with toil and 
courage and patiense with deep counsel and a resolution that* 
has never faltered nor shaken. 

" Errors have occurred; the Agents of my Government* 
have spared no pains and no self- sacrifice to correct tibem. 
if abuses have been proved, vigorous hands have been 
laboured to apply a remedy. 



256 % REWA KAHTHA BIRBCTORY. .. 

11 No secret of Empire can avert the scourge of 
draught and plague, but experienced administrators have 
done all that skill and devotion are capable of doing to 
mitigate those dire calamities of Nature. 

" For a longer period than was ever known in your 
land before, ycu have escaped the dire calamities of war 
within your borders, internal peace has been unbroken. 

u In the great Charter cf 1858 Queen Victoria gave 

you a noble assurance of Her earnest desire to stipulate the 

peaceful industry of India, to promote works of public 

utility and imprcverneut and to administer the Government 
for the benefit of all resident therein. 

•• The schemes that have been diligently framed and 
executed for promoting your material convenience and advance- 
schemes unsurpassed in their magnitude and their boldness 
bear witness before the world to the zeal with which that 
benignant; promise has been fulfilled, 

"The rights and privileges of the Feudatory Princes 
and Ruling Chiefs have been respected, preserved and guarded 
and the loyalty of their allegiance has been unswerving. 

"No man among my subjects has been favourei, 

molested or disquieted by reason of his religious b9lief or 

worship. All men have enjoyed the protection of the Law. 

The law itself has been administered without disrespect to 

creed or caste, or to usages and ideas rooted in your 

civilization; it has been amplified in form, and its machinery 

adjusted to the requirements of ancient communities slowly 
entering a new world. 

** The charge confided to my Government concerns the 
destinies of countless multitudes of men, and for ages to 
come, and it is a paramount duty to repress with a stern 
arm guilty conspiracies that have no just causa and no 
serious aim. These conspiracies I know to be abhorrent to 
the loyal and faithful characters of the vast hosts of my 
Indian subjects, and I will not salar them to turn me 
aside from my task of building up the fabric of security and 
order. 



POLITICAL REFORMS-PREVIOTJS ROYAL PROCLAMATIONS. 25 T 

" Unwilling that thin historic anniversary should pass 
without some signal mark of Royal clemency and grace, I 
have directed that;, as was ordered on the memorable 
occasion of the Coronation Darbir in 1903, the sentences o£ 
persons whom our courts have duly punished for offences 
against the Law should be remitted or in Various degrees 
reduced, and it is my wish that such wrong doers may 
remain mindful of this act of mercy and may conduct 
themselves without offence henceforth. 

t; Steps are being continuously taken towards obliterating* 
distinctions of race, as the test for access to posts of public 
authority and power. In this path I confidently expect and 
intend the progress henceforward to be steadfast and sure 
as education spreads, experience ripens and the lessons of 
responsibility are well learned by the keen intelligence and 
apt capabilities cf India. 

u From the first the principle of representative 
institijtions began to be gradually introduced, and the time 
has come when, in the judgment of my Viceroy and Governor 
General and others of my counsellors, that principle may 
be prudently extended. 

• Important classes among you, representing ideas that? 
have been fostered and encouraged by British rule, claim 
equality of citizenship and a greater share in the legislation 
and government. The politic satisfaction of such a claim 
will strengthen, not impair, existing authority and power. 
The administration will be all the more efficient, if the 
officers who conduct it have greater opportunities of regular 
contact with those whom it affects and with those who 
influence and reflect the common opinion about it, 

" I will not speak of the measures that are now being- 
diligently framed for these objects. They will speedily be 
made known to you, and will, I am very confident, mark a 
notable stage in the beneficent progress of your affa ; rs. 

11 I recognise the valoar aid fidelity of my Indian 
33 



258 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Troops, and at the new year I have ordered that opportunity 
should b9 taken to show in substantial form this my high 
appreciation of their martial instincts, th3ir splendid 
disciplin3 and their faithful readiness for service. 

u The welfare of India was one of the objects dearest 
to the heart of Qieen Victoria. B/ van ever sinc9 my visit 
in 1875, the interest of India, its Prices aad people? have 
been watched with an affectionabs solicitude that tim3 caa 
nob weaken. My dear son, the Prince of Wales, and the 
Princess of Wales retirnad from their sojourn among yon 
with warm attachment to your hnd and true and earnest 
interest in its well being and contentment. 

"These sincere feelings of active sympathy and hope 
for India on the part of my Royal House and Line only 
represent, and they most truly represeab, ths deep and 
united will and purpose of the people of this Kingdom. 

" May divine protection and favour strengthen the 
wisdom and mutual good will that are needed for the 
achievement of a task as glorious as was ever committed to 
rulers and subjects in any State or Empire of recorded 
time." 




POLITICAL KEFORMS-PBEVIOUS ROYAL PROCLAMATIONS. 25*' 

His Majesty King George's 
Proclamation. 

HEAD BY THE HERALDS AT DARBAR AT DELHI. 

12th December 1911. 
George R. I. 

"Whereas by Our Royal Proclamations bearing date the 
19th day of July and 7th day of November in the year of 
our Lord 1910 in the First year of Our Reign, we did 
publish and declare our Royal intention, by the Favour and 
Blessing of Almighty God, to celebrate the solemnity of our 
Royal Coronation upon the 22nd day of June 1911 ; 

"And whereas, by the Favour and Blessing of Almighty 
Ood, We were enabled to celebrate the solemnity upon; 
Thursday, the 22nd June last ; 

" And whereas by Our Royal Proclamation bearing date 
22nd day of March in the year of Our Lord 1911 in the 
First year of Our Reign, We did declare that it was Our 
wish and desire ourselves to mak9 known to all our loving 
Subjects within our Indian Dominions that the said solemnity 
had so been celebrated, and to call to Our Presenc9 Our 
Governors, Lieutenant Governors, and other of Our high Officers 
the Princes, Chiefs and Nobles of Native States under Our 
Protection, and the Representatives of all the Provinces of 
Our Indian Empire ; 

Now We do, by this Our Royal Proclamation, make 
acnounc3ment thereof and extend to all Our officers, and to 
all Princes, Chiefs and Peoples now at Delhi assembled Our ; 
Royal and Imperial Greeting, and assure them of the deep 
affection with which we regard our Indian Empire, the 
welfare and prosperity of w v hich are , and ever will be Our 
constant concern. 

Given at Our Court at Delhi the 12th day of December 
1911, in the second year of Our Reign. 

God save the KING EMPEROR. 



J€0 



BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



BRITISH Territory in the Indian Empire. 
(Administrative Divisions.) 



Provinces. 


No. of 
Districts. 


Area in 
square 
miles. 


Population 
(1911) 




Ajmere Merwara ... 


2 


2,711 


5,01,395 




Andamans & Nicobars 


... 


3,143 


26,459 




Assam ... 


12 


52.959 


6713,635 




Baluchistan 


6 


45,804 


4,14 412 




Bengal 


28 


78,412 


4,54,83,077 




JBehar and Orissa — . 


21 


83,205 


3.44.90,084 




Bombay Presidency .♦» 


26 


1,23,064 


1,96.72,642 




Bombay (excluding 
Sind) 


26 


75,918 


1,61,13,042 




Sind 


6 


47,066 


35,13,435 




Aden ... 


t» 


80 


46,165 




Burma 


41 


2.36 738 


1,21,15,217 




Central Pro vinces 










and Berar 


22 


1,00,345 


1,39,16,308 




Coorg 


] 


1,582 


1,74,976 




Madras 


24 


1,41,726 


4,14,05,404 




N. W. Frontier 










Province 


5 


16,466 


21,96 933 




Punjab 


29 


97,209 


1,99,74,956 




United Provinces ... 


48 
267 


1,07,164 


4,71,82,044 




Total... 


10,97,901 


24,42,67,542 





POLITICAL REFORMS-NATIVE STATES. 

NATIVE States Territory in India. 



2€t 



States & Agencies. 


Area in 
square miles. 


Population 
1911 


Remarks. 


Baluchistan States ... 


86,511 


3,56,432 




Baroda State 


8 099 


20 32,798 




Bengal States 


32 773 


45,48,161 




Bombay States 


65 761 


74,11,567 




Central India States,.. 


78,772 


93,56,980 




Central Provinces 
States... 


31,188 


21,17,002 




Eastern Bengal and 
Assam „ 


»> 


5 75 835 




Hyderabad State 


82,698 


1,33.74,676 




Kashmiro State 


80,900 


31,58,126 




Madras States 


9,969 


48,11,841 




Cochin State ... 


•> 


9,18,110 




Travancore 


»> 


34,28,975 


■ 


Mysore State 


29,444 


58,06,193 




% N. W # Frontier 
Province 


»» 


16,22,094 


■ 


Punjab States 


36,532 


42,12.794 




Rajputana States 


1,27,541 


l,05,30-,432 


• 


Sikkim ... 


ii 


87,920 


j' 


United Provinces 
States ... 


5,079 


8,32,036 




Total... 


6.75,267 


7.08,64,995 





POLITICAL RBFORMS-P^KtrOTLAttS^ STATES. ? 26$ 

Particulars of principal Native States in India. 



Names. 


Area in 
square 
miles. 


Population 
1911 


Approxi- 
mate Reve- 
nue Rs. 


a 

PS 


1. Hyderabad 


«•• 


82,698 ■■ 


133,74,676 


6 Orores. 


M;A.* 


2. Mysore 


•*• 


29,461 


57.05,359 


3 » 


R. A,* 


3. Baroda 


••• 


8 182 


20,00,000 


2 » 


R. A.* 


4. Kashmir 


• •• 


84,432 


31,58,126 


I ». 




5. Nepal 


... 


54,000 


50,00,000 


2 k 


< 


6. Sikkim 


••• 


2,818 


87 920 


50 Lakhs 




7. Bhutan 


••• 


18,000 


3,00,000 






BALUCHISTAN 










8. Ehelat 


••• 


54,713 


3,36,423 


13 Lakhs 




9. Kharsan 


••• 


18,565 


22,663 


1 „ 




10. Las Bela 


... 


7,132 


61,205 


4 




N. W. FRON^IE 


:r 








\ 


11. Chifcrai 


••• 


]! 




,. 




12. Dir 


••• 


\- 7,700 

i 


16,22,094 


P „ 




13. Bajaun 


• • • 


1 








PANJAB. 












14. Bhavalpup 


•.. 


15,000 


7,80,394 


27 „ 




15. Chamba 


••• 


3,216 


1,34,351 


7 „ 





NorE.-M. A.* means that the Minister has been asked by the Nizam 
to draw up a scheme for organizing a Representative Assembly. 

R. A.* means that there is a Representative Assembly to watch* 
criticise Sf influence the administration* 



264 



XKWA KANTHA DIBECTORY. 



Name. 


Area in 
square 
miles. 


Population 
1911 


Approxi- 
mate Reve- 
nue Rs. 


OS 

a 


16. Faridkot 


642 


1,30 ; 374 


8 Lakhs 




17. Jhind ... 


1,259 


2 71,728 


15 „ 




16 Kapurthala 


630 


2,68,244 


25 „ 




19. Malerkotla ... 


167 


71,144 


14 „ 


■ 


SO. Mai di 


1,200 


1,81,110 


5 „ 




21. Nabha 


928 


2,48,892 


15 „ 




22. Patiala 


5,412 


14,07,659 


72 „ 




23. Sirmur(Naban; 


1,198 


1 38,564 


8 „ 




RAJPUTANA. 




% 






24. Udepur 


12,953 


1293,776 


50 „ 




25. Banswara 


1,946 


1,65,463 


8 „ 




26. Dungarpur 


1,447 


1,59,192 


6 




27. Partapgarh ... 


886 


62,704 


4 „ 




28. Jodhpur 


34 963 


20,57,553 


80 „ 




29, Jaisalmir 


16,062 


88,311 


4 




30. Sirohi 


1,964 


1,89,127 


8 „ 




31. Jaipur 


15,579 


26,36,674 


65 




32. Kishangadh ... 


858 


87,191 


8 -, 




33. Laws 


19 


2,564 


11,000 





STATES OF INDIA. 



J65- 



Name. 


Area in 
square 


Population 


Approxi- 
mate Reve- 


m 

J* 

as 

a 

CL> 




miles. 


1911 


nue Re. 


34. Bundi 


2,220 


2,18,730 


10 Lakhs. 




35. Tonk 


1,114 


3,03,181 


J* » 




£6. Shahpura 


405 


47,397 


3 „ 




37 Bharatpur 


1,982 


6,26,665 


32 




38 Dholpur 


1,155 


2,70,973 


15 „ 




39. Karauli 


1,242 


1,56,786 


6 




40. Kotah 


5,684 


6,39 089 


41 




41. Jhalawar 


810 


96,271 


6 


R .A.* 


42. Bikaner 


23 f 311 


7,00,983 


6^ „ 


R. A.* 


43. Alwar 


3,14] 


7,91,688 


40 ; 




CENTRAL INDIA 










AGENCY. (153;. 










44. Gwalior 


25,133 


31,02,279 


140 


R. A.* 


45. Indore 


9,506 


10.07,856 


70 




46. Bhopal 


6,902 


7,30,383 


30 




47. Rewah 


13,000 


15,14 843 


53 




48. Dhar 


1,783 


1 54,070 


9 




49 Jaora 


568 


75 : 951 


8 », 




50. Datia 


911 


1,54,603 


9 




51. Orcha 


2,079 


3,30.032 


11 :> 





"Notb.-R. A. means that there is a Representative Assembly to wat^h, 
criticise and influence the administration. 
34 



266 



RBWA KAtfTHA DIRECTORY. 



Names. 



Area in 
square 
miles. 



Population 
1911 



Approxi- 
mate Reve- 
nue Rs. 



CENTRAL 
PHOVINCES. 
52-i 

65 J 15 Small States 

UNITED 
PROVINCES. 

67. Rampur 

68. Tehri 

69. Benares 

BIHAR AND 
O^I-S-»A. 

70. KlhH?8rt Welti 

71. buraik-rJa 

9-i J 2i Urissa States- 

PRKMUE\OY. 

95. Co i uii ij;ii<ir 



96. Hill Tipuer-; 
BOMBAY I J KE 

97. ivuiitnpuc 

98. Cutch 

99. Khairpur 
100. Cam bay 



31 174 



892 

4,200 

988 



Y 28,648 



1,807 
4,086 

3,165 

7,616 

6,050 

350 



21,17,002 



5.31,898 
2,99,853 



39 42,972 



5,93 052 
2.29,613 



S,33,441 



5,13,429 

2,23,788 

75,000 



25 Lakhs. 



45 

6 

50 



70 



30 
20 

57 

25 

15 

7 



*•« 

CQ 

a 

« 



STATES OF INDIA. 



267 



Names. 


Area in 
square 
miles. 


Population 
1921 


Approxi- 
mate Reve- 
nue Ks 


m 

CS 

a 

CD 


KATBIAWAR. (187) 










101. Junagadh 


3,284 


4,55,221 


50 Lakhs. 




102. Navanagar 


3,791 


3,45,040 


50 




103 Bhavnagar 


2,860 


4.25 955 


50 


R, A.* 


104 Porbandar 


636 


1,01,881 


12 




105. Dbrangadhra ... 


1,156 


88 406 


25 




106. Mjrvi 


821 


97,697 


15 




107. Gondal 


1,024 


1,65 982 


15 




108. Wankaner 


414 


36,822 


6 •, 


R. A.* 


109. Pslitani 


288 


57,929 


71 

• 2 " 




110. Dhrol 


282 


23,638 


2 




111. Lirabdi 


344 


35,422 


n » 




112. Rajkot 


282 


61,000 


8 




113. Wadhwan 


236 


37,946 


6 




114. Jafrabadf ... 


42 


12,500 


1 „ 


f Belorgs: 


Smaller States. (173) 








to Janjira' 
State. 


REWA KANTHA. (61) 

115. Rvjpipla 


1,517 


1,68,454 


2?,50,000 




116. Chhota-Udenur 


890 


1,25 746 


10,00,000 




117. Baria 


813 


1,87,289 


. 9,50,000 





*Note.-R. A. means that there is a Representative Assembly to watch, 
criticise and influence the administration. 



268 



REWA KA.NTHA DIBECTOBY. 



Names. 


Area in 
square 
miles. 


Population 
1921 


Approxi- 
mate Reve- 
nue Rs. 


m 

a 


118, Lunavada 


... 


388 


83,242 


5 50.000 




119 Bdasinor 


•• 


189 


44,273 


2,75,000 




120. Sunth 


... 


394 


70,964 


275000 




Smaller States 


^55) 










MAHI KANTHA 


(52) 










121. Idar 


.. 


1,669 


2,26,355 


15 Lakhs. 




122. Polo 


• 1 1 


135 




1 „ 




123. Danta 


... 


347 


20,000 


1 :, 




Smaller States 


(49) 










PALANPUR. 












124. Palanpur 


... 


1,766 


2,36,694 


8 




125. Radhanpur 


... 


1,150 


66.003 


6 „ 




Smaller States 


(40) 










SURAT AGENCY 










126. D ;arampur 


... 


704 


1,14,995 


n u 




127. Bansda 


... 


215 


44 594 


& ., 




123 Sachin 


• • • 


47 


18,903 


3 „ 




DECOAN 7 . 












129. Javbar 


... 


310 


£3 489 


3 




130. Janjira 


• •a 


377 


1.01 120 


6 ,. 




13 i. Sawantwadi 


— . 


925 


2,17 240 


6 




132. Aundh 


... 


501 


€8,995 


3 ,. 




133 Phaltan 


... 


397 


55,996 


* „ 




134. Bhor 


• •• 


925 


1,44.601 


s „ 




135. Akalkot 


••• 


498 


89,082 







STATES OF INDIA. 



269 



Names. 


Area in 
square 
mile?. 


Population 
1921 


Approxi- 
mate Reve- 
nue R?. 


m 
*** 
3 

a 

W 


136. Jtth 


980 


78,643 


3 Lakhs. 




137. Difhpur 


96 


8,833 


2 „ 




138. Sangli 


1.112 


2 27 280 


12 




139. Miraj (Senior) 


339 


80.281 


H „ 




,, (Junior) 


210 


36,571 


3 




140. Kurundvvad 

(Senior) 


J 82 


38 375 


2 „ 




(Junior) 


114 


3 4,084 


2 „ 




141. Jamkhandi 


524 


100 304 


10 ,. 




142. Madhol 


368 


62,831 


4 




143. Ramdurg 


169 


36.610 


n „ 




144. Sawanur 


70 


17.909 


n , 




MADRAS 










PRESIDENCY. 










145. Travancore 


7,129 


34,28,975 


128 Lakhs 


R. A.* 


146. Cochin 


1,361 


9,18,110 


47 „ 


R. A»* 


147. Pudukotai 


1,178 


4 11,878 


16 




148. Baugana Palie 


255 


39 356 


3 „ 




149. Sandur 
§ 


161 


13,517 


2 





*Notk.-R. A. mean;* that there is a Representative Assembly to watoh, 
criticize and influence the administration. 

§ Including the smaller states the total number oE Native States 
in India is ibout 700. 



270 



REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



SARDARS OF GUJARAT. 




1 

2 



4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 

12 

33 



FIRST CLASS. 

Ali Valad Zain E! Edrus Saiyad. 

Agarsinghji Raisinghji, Thakor cf 
Gaiuph 

Chhatrasinorji Xunversaheb, Thakor of 
Bhamaria .♦. 

Davar K*ikhosru Edulji Modi 

Dulabava Raisinghji, Thakor of Kervada 

Fatesinorh-ji Dipsinghii. Talukdar cf 
anjn 

Jitsinghji Bharatsinghji, Thakor of 
Jhauor. ... .., 

Mnzz^far Hussenkhan valad Naw*b 
Ghulaui Babakhan Mir, Nawab Saheb 

Malek Shermia Bapjraia 

Mir Masud Alauikhan 

Naharsinghji Ishwarsinghji, Thakore of 
Aruod 

Rustamji Jehangirji Vakil, Khan 
Bahadur 

Sursinghji Dajiraj, Talukdar cf Utelia... 



I 



Surat. 

Gamph under 
Dhanahuka. 

Bhamaria 
Halol Mahal 

Surat 

K rwida under 

Amod. 
Karyjri under 

Halol 

Jhanor under 
Ankleshwar. 

Surat, 



Dholka. 

Surat. 

Amcd. 

Ahmedabad. 



Utelia under 
Dhoika. 



SARDARS OP GTjJAKAT. 



271 




14 



2 
3 
4 
5 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 

13 
14 



Udesinghji Ganpatsiughji Tfaakor, of 
Sarod 

SECOND CLASS. 

Amarsingbji Indarsinghji, Talukdar of 
Mogar. 

Ashkarali Lalunan Talukdar of Oran ... 

Bamanji Ardeshir Dalai 

Bapuji Khurshedji Modi 

Bhikhabhai alias Mansingji Nathubhai. 
Talukdar af Tagdi Vavdi 

Bulakhi Punjaji, Talukdar of Ranpur .., 

Caandrasinghji Hituatsingji, Taakor of 
of Matar 

Dipsingji Ainarsiugji, Talukdar of 
Limcii ... ... ♦.. 

Gop&l Manohar Tainbekar ... 

Hamirsinhji Shivsingji, Thakor of Dahej. 

Harishchandra Bhagvantrav ... 

Imam Haidarbaksh valad Muaamian 
Saheb Saiyad 

Ishwardas Jagjiwaadas Stare.,* 

Janardaa Virbhadra Pathakji... 



Sarod under 
Jambusar. 



Mcgar under 
Anaud. 

Or-n under 
Prantij. 

Ahmedabad. 

Ralej under 

Borsad. 
Tagdi Vavdi 
Gogha Mahal. 

Kan par under 
Dhandhuka. 

Matar under 
Amod. 

Lim li. 



Dakor. 

Dabej under 
Waghra. 

Abmedabad. 

Do. 

Surab. 

Do. 



272 



RKWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 




15 Jayendrarao Babarao Divetia 

16 Miiza Aftftb Husainkhan Badshahi 

Diwan 

17 Muhammad Ghulam R»zi alias 

Amumiaa £aheb Clibota Saheb .. 

18 Motilal Chunilal, Rao Bahadur 

19 Mulsingji Jibav^, Thakore of Kana 

20 Naharsingbji Mehramansinghji,, 
Talukdar of Dehvan 

21 Payaf Muhamma<ikhan Datifkhan, 
K&sbati of Dholka 

22 Furshottamdas Viharidas 

23 Saiyid Pirsaheb AmirSahob, Inamdar 
* of Bhuva ... 

24 Vajesingh Jorawarsingh Naik 



Ahmedabad. 
Do. 

Do. 

Broach. 
Kuna. 

Dehvan under 
Borsad. 

Dholka. 

Nadiad. 

Broach. 

Tanda unier 
Dohad 



TA.BLB OF SAiTJTM. ' 



27*'' 



TABLE OF SALUTES 

TO 
ROYALTIES AND OTHER HIGH OFFICERS OF GOVERNMENT. 



Persons. No, of Guns. 
Imperial Salute... ... 101 

The King and Emperor 
when present in person 101 

Members of the Royal 
family 31 

Royal Standard and Royal 
Salute 31 

Royal Salute on the An- 
niversaries of the Birth, 
Accession and Coro- 
nation of the Reign- 
ing Sovereign ; the 
Birthday of the Queen 
Mother : Proclamation 
Day ... 31 

Viceroy and Governor 
General cf India ... 31 

Independent Asiatic Sov- 
vereigns ... ^ 21 

Other Foreign Sovereigns 21 
Members of their families ,*< 
and their Standards ... 21 

Ambassadors 19 

Governors of Presidencies 17 

The President of the 
s Council of India ... 17 

35 



Persons. No. of Guns. 

Governor-General of 
Portuguese Settlements 
in India 17 

Governor of Pondichery 17 

Governor of His Majesty's 
Colonies 17 

Lieutenant Governors of 
Provinces in India ..,15 

Commander in Chief in 
India (if General) ... It 

Commander in Chief in 
India (if a Field 
Marshal) ... ... 19 

Generals and Admirals or 
their flags ... 15 



Members of the Viceroy's 
Council ... ... 15 

Plenipotentiaries and 

Envoys 15 

^Ueut.-Governors of Hie 
Majesty's Colonies ... 15 

Vice-Admirals, Lieut.-Ge* 
nerais or their Flags 13 

Agents to the Vicaroy & ■■• 
Governor General. .... 1? 



m 



BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



Persons. No. 6f Guns. 

Agent to the Governor 
of Bombay in Kathia- 
war ... ••• ... 13 

Residents .» 13 

Chief Commissioners of 
Provinces and Commis- 
sioner of Sind ... 13 

Members of the Executive 
Council of a Local 
Government 13 

Hear Admirals and Major 
Generate or their flags 11 

Political Agents and 

Charge de Affairs ... 11 



Persons. No. of Guns, 

Commanders of First Class 
and Brigadier Generals 9 

The Portuguese Governor 
of Daman ... ,.. 9 

The Governor of Div .. # 9 
Return salutes to Foreign 

Men of War ... „ 

Return salutes to the Cap- 
tains of the Navy and 
Naval Officers of In* 
ferior Rank ... ... 1 



j f fa 






SALUTES TO INDIAN PBIHC1S AND CHIEFS. 



IT* 



Salutes to Indian Princes 
and Chiefs. 



SALUTES CP 21 GUNS. 

Baroda, the Maharaja 
Gaekwar of. 

Gwalicr, the Maharaja 

Scindia of. 
Hyderabad, the Nizam of. 
Kashmir, the Maharaja of, 
Muaqat and Oman, the 

Sultan of. 
Mysore, the Maharaja of. 
w H. H. Maharani P. 19 

SALUTES OF 19 GUNS. 

Bhopal, the Begam ( or 
Nawab) of. ... L. 21 

Indore, the Maharaja 

(Holkar) of. L. P. 21 

Kelat, the Khan (Wali) of. 

P. 21 
Kolhapur, the Maharaja 
ot ••• ... ••• Jr. 21 

Nepal. Prime Minister P. 17 

Travancore, the Maharaja 

OI ... ••• • •<, XT. <>l 

Udaipur ( Mewar ) The 
Maharana of P. 21 

SALUTES OP 17 GUNS. 

Bhawalpur, The Nawab of. 



17 guns. 
Bharatpur, The Maharaja 

of ... L. lfr 

Bikaner, The Maharaja of 

L. P. 19 
Bundi, The Maharao Raja of 
Cochini The R^ja of 
Catch. The Maharao of L. 19' 

Jaipur. The Maharaja of 

L. 19 P. 2t 

Jodhpur. ( Marwar ) The 

Maharaja of ... L. 19 
tf Regent of P. 17 

Karauli. The Maharaja of 
Kotah. The Maharao of P. 1» 

Patiala. The Maharaja of 

P. 19 

Rewa. The Maharaja of 

Tonk. The Nawab of P. 19 

SALUTES OF 15 GUNS. 

Alwar. The Maharaja of P. 17 

Banswara. The Maharawal of 

Bhutan. The Maharaja of 

Datia. The Maharaja of 

Dewas ( Senior Branch ) 
The Maharaja of. 



Note:-L. means Local. 



P. means Personal; 



•276; 



BBW-i KAUTffA DJRHCUOB?. 



2 



15 guns. 
Dew*s ( Junior Branch ) 
The Maharaja of. 

Dhar. The Maharaja of. 

Dholpur. The Maharaj Rana 
Ot ••• ••• ••• Jr. i • 

Dun^arpur. The Mahara- 
wal of 

Idar. The Maharaja of 

Jaisalmer. The Maharawal of 

Khairpur. The Mir of. L. 17 

Kishangarh. The Maharaja 

of P. 17 

Orohha. The Maharaja of P. 17 
Pratapgarh. The Mahara- 
wal of 
Ram pur. The Nawab of 
Sikkim. The Maharaja of 
Sirohi. The Maharao of. P. 17 

SALUTES OF 13 GUNS. 

Benares. The Maharaja of 

P. 15 
Bhavnagar. The Maharaja 
of ... ... ... L, 15 

CoochBehar. The Maha- 
raja of 

Dhraogadhra. The Maha- 
raja of 

Jhalawar. The Maharaja 
Rana of 

Jaora. The Nawab of 



13 guns. ^>^ A ° 
Jind. The Maharaja of 

L & P. 15 
Junagarh. The Nawab of 

LP. 15 
Kapurthala. The Maharaja 
of L. P. 15 

Nabha L. & P # 15 

Nawanagar. The Maharaja 
of ••• ••• ... P. 15 

Palanpur. The Nawab of 

Porbandar. The Maharaja of 

Raj pi pi a. Do Do 

Rublam. The Raja of. L. 15 

Tripura. The Maharaja of 

SALUTES OP 11 GUNS; 

Agakhan, H. H. the P. 11 

Ajaigarh The Maharaja of 

All Rajpur, the Raja of 

Baoni. The Nawab of 

Barwani, the Rana of 

Bhor. Pant Sacmv of P. 11 

Bijawar. The Maharaja of 

Bilaspur ( Kahlur ). The 
Raja o£ 

Camoay. The Nawab of 

Chamba. The Raja of 

Charkhari. The Maharaja of 

Chhaturpur. The Maharaja of 

Chicral, Mehtar of 



Nqte;-L. means Local. 



P. meana Personal. 



SALUTES TO INDIAN PRINCES AND. CHIEFS. 



27* 



11 guns. 
Faridkot. The Raja of 
Gondal. The Thakor Saheb of 
Janjira. The Nawab of P. 13 
Jhabua. The Raja of 
Maler Kotla. The Nawab of, 
Mandi. The Raja of 
Manipur. The Maharaja of 
Morvi. The Thakor Saheb of 
Narsinghgarh. The Raja of 
Panna. The Maharaja of 
Pudukhotai. The Raja of. 
Radhanpur. The Nawab of 
Rajgarh. The Raja of 
Sailana. The Raja of 
Samthar. The Raja of 

Sirmur (Nathan ). The 
Maharaja of 

Sitamau. The Raja cf 

Suket. The Raja of 

Tehri (Garhwal). The Raja of 

SALUTES OF 9 GUNS. 

Banganapalli. The Nawab of 

Balasinor (Vadasinor). The 

Nawab of 
Bansda. The Raja of 
Baraundha. The Raja of 
Baria. The Raja of ,., P. 11 

Chhota-Udepur (or Mohan). 
The Raja o£ 



9 guns. 

Danta y the Maharana of 

Dharampur. The Raja of 

Dhrol. Th» Thakor Saheb of 

Fadthli (Shukra). The Sultan of 

Hsipaw. The Sawba of 

Karond (Kalahandi). The 
Raja of 

Kengtuog. The Sawbwa of 
Khilchipur. The Rao 
Bahadur of 

Kishn and Sootra The 
Sultan of 

Lahej or Al Hanba. The 
Sultan of 

Limbdi(Limri).The Thakor 
Saheb of 

Loharu. Tiie Nawab of P. 9 
Lunawada. The Raja of P. II 
Maihar. The Raja of 
Mayurbhanj, The Maharaja of 
Mong Nai. The Sawbwa of 
Mudhoi. The Chief of 
Nagod. The Raji of 
Palitana. The Thakor 

Saheb of 
Patna. The Maharaja of 
Rajkot. The Thakor Saheb of 
Sachin. The Nawab of P. 11 
Sangli. The Chi*f of 



Note:-L. means Local. 



P. means Personal 



278 



RBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



9 guns. 
Savantwadi. The Sir Desai of 

Shehr and M oka] la. The 
Sultan of 

Sonpur. The Raja of 

Sunth. The Raja of 

Vankaner. (Wankaner) The 
Raj Saheb of ... P. 11 

Wadhwan. The Thakor 
Saheb of 

Yawnghwe (or Nyawngy we) 
The Sawbwa of 



Personal Salutes of 9 guns. 
Bashahr, Raj i Fadamsing 
Dthala, Amir of 
Jamkhindi, Chief of 
Kanker, Chief of 
Las IJsla, Jam of 
Tawnpeng, Sawbwa of 



i 



Note:-L. means Local. 



P. means Personal, 




POSTAL TARIFF. 279 

Postal Tariff, 

INLAND— ( applicable to Ceylon also.) 

Following rates of postage are charged in respect of 
Iboth private and official letters, registered newspapers and 
books and pattern packets sent by the inland post : — 

v r P , 2 Annas. 

Parcels— upto :0 lolas 

2U to 4) „ .- ' - 4 " 

For every 40 Tolas above ... * » 

" , " h Anna. 

Post Cards ... ... — "' - 

Letters up to '>% Tolas... ... ••• _- " 

For every additional ii Tolas ... * 

NEWSPAPERS. 
Not exceeding 8 Tolas ... ... \ anna. 

Exceeding eight but not exceeding 20 Tolas J anna. 
For every additional 20 Tolas ... ... | anna. 

BOOKS AND PATTERN PACKETS. 
For every 5 Tolas or part of it» ... \ anna. 

MONEY ORDERS. 
For any sum not exceeding Rs. 10 ...2 annas. 

Exceeding Rs. 10 up to 25 ... ... 4 anna?. 

Exceeding Rs. 25, 4 annas for each complete sum of Rs % 
25 and 4 annas for the remainder, 
provided that if the remainder doea 
not exceed Rs. 10, the charge for it* 
shall be 2 annas. 
V. P. P. 

On any sum specified for recovery not exceeding 

Rs. 10 ... ..r ... 2 annas. 

— „ — exceeding Rs. 10 upto Re. 25-4 attftas. 
~- >f — — •*— R9- 25-4 annas for each 
complete sum of Rs. 25 and as in 
( the case of Money Order. 



280 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

* FOREIGN TARIFF. 

( Not applicable to Ceylon except in respect of insurance fees or 

to Portuguese India except in respeet of insurance fees and parcel 

postage). 

LETTERS. 

To the United King- 1 

dom, other British , ji an nas for tie first ounce, and 1 anna for 
possessions and ? eac h additional ounce or part of that weight. 

Egypt including the I 
Soudan. j 

I 2i annas for the first ounce, and H annas* 
To the other countries, I £ or every additional ounce or part of that 
colonies or places. J we io-ht. 

Postcards single ... ... ... ... ... 1 anna. 

„ Reply ... ... ... ... ... 2 annas. 

Printed Papers. — i anna for every two ounces or part of that 
weight. 

Business Papers — ^ anna for every 2 ounces or part of that 
weight subject to minimum charge of 1 anna for each packet. 

Samples. — ^ anna for every two ounces or part of that weight, 
subject, to a minimum charge of 1 anna for each packet. 

(The rates shown ahove are those chargeable when the postage is 
prepaid ). 

Parcels. — (Prepayment compulsory). The rates vary with the 
countries to which they are addressed. 

The rates to the United Kingdom are : — 

Via Gibraltar. Overland. 

Rs. As. Ps. Rs. As. Ps. 

Not over lbs 3 —12—0 1— 8 —0 

„ „ 7 1— 8—0 2—4-0 

„ 11 ... — 2 — 4-0 3— —0 

Registration fees=2 annas for each letter, postcard or packet. 
Money Orders. — To countries on which money orders have io be 
drawn in rupees currency, the rates of commission are the same as i» 
•the ca^e o'fi' inland money orders. K 

To countries on which money orders ' have to be drawn in 
(Stirling, the rates are as fix<gd temporarily from time to time in 
accordance with variations in the market' rate of Exchange. 



INLAND TELEGfcAPH TARIFF. 281 

Inland Telegraph Tariff, 

The tariff for inland telegrams is as folio W3 : — 
Private and State Express and Ordinary. 

Rs. As. Rs. As ; g S 

Minimum charge... ... ... 1 — 8 — 12 5>-S~§ 

Each additional word over 12-0—2 — 1 | J 

Additional charges. 
Minimum frr reply pud telegram ... ... 12 annas. 

Acknowledgment of receipt .... ... ... 12 ,, 

Multiple telegrams, each 100 words or less ... 4 ,, 
Collation ..xne quarter of charge for telegram. 

^ If both the offices of origin and 
destination are closed ... ... 2 

If only one of the offices is closed 1 



Fcr acceptance of 

an Express telegram 

during the hours ' If the telegram has to pass through 



when office is closed. 



any closed intermediate cffio, an 
additional fee in respect of each 
such office ... ... ... tl 

} The usual inland 

Signalling by flig or semaphore to or f , , a j 

° to J ^ r > charge plus a fixed 

from ships per telegram. ) f QQ f g auDas# 

Boat hire ... ... Amount actually necessary. 

Copies of telegrams each 100 words or less 4 annas. 

Press Express Ordinary. J Z 

Rs. as. Rs A*. ! g 



Minimum charge ... ... ... 1 — — 8 



o 



I 2 



HD 



E'teh additional 6 words ovar 48... 0— 2 0—1 J <j 



36 



282 KEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

TO CEYLON. 

An Ordinary private telegram to Ceylon Is charged 
for at the rate of one rupee for twelve words*, with two 
annas for each additional word. 

Express fjr two rupees for twelve words, with three 
annas for each additional word.' 

Foreign Tariff. 

The charges for foreign telegr ims vary with the 
countries to which they ar6 addressed. The rates per word 
for private and state telegrams to all countries in Europe 
are as follows : — 



Via Turkey 
,. Indo 
,» Eastern 



Private 


State. 


Rs. As. 


Rs. As. 


1—3 


o—o 


1—2 


o-n 


1—2 


0—9 







Section III, 

TREATIES AND ENGAGEMENTS. 







TREATIES — PREVENTION OF 8ATI. 285 

SECTION III. 

TREATIES AND ENGAGEMENTS, 

PREVENTION OF SATI. 

Translation of a Note from A. Remington, Esq, Officiating 
1st Assistant Political Commissioner and Resident at 
Baroda, to the address of the following Rulers of the 
different States placed under his Political Snperintendence, 
dated 3rd April 1840, viz., — 

To, Mabardna Veris&ljee, of RdjpeepU. 

To, Md">iWi7al Gumau Singjee, of Oodeypor. 

To, Mdnaraval Pirtheerajjee, of Deogarh Baria. 

To, Mabad/.a Futteh Singjee, of Lunawd.dk. 

To, Sana Bhowani Singjee, of Soonth. 

To, Thakor Jalam Singjee, of Bhadarwd, 

To, Tbakcr Sardarsing, of Wknkaner. 

Under instructions received from the Resident of 
Baroda, conveyed to me in his letter, dated llth March 
1840, I write to inform you tnat it having come to the 
notice of that Officer that a British subject bora ia 
Ratnagherry but residing at Baroda, died, and his widow 
immolated herself iu observance of the rite o£ s*ti, whioh 
the Gaikwar Government took no measures to prevent, the 
Political Commissioner addressed a note to His Highness 
deprecating the occurrence, and suggesting that as the 
British Government had, after full consideratijn, abolished 
the rite of sati in its own territory, His Highness should 
introduce a similar arrangement with his own, to which 
His Highness replied that, according to the request* of the 
Resident, he would cause proper arrangement to ba made, 
and this concurrenee being communicated to Government, it 
was pleased to declare that no act could bave been .performed 
more acceptable to it than the abolition of sati. I beg to 
state that it appears to me advisable that yoU should take 



286 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

measures to prohibit the practice in your own Stafe, in. 
respect to which, as the British Government are most 
intent on the speedy abolition of this rite, you will have 
the goodness, after full consideration of the above, to favour 
me with a reply. 

(Sd.) A. Remington. 

0%. 1st Asst. Pol. Commr. 



Translation of a Note addressed by Maharana Verisaljee, 
of Rajpipla, to A Remington, Esq., Officiating 1st 
Assistant Political Commissioner for Gujerat, dated 

Vaishakh Sud 8th Samvat 1896, 

I have learnb the contents of your letter on the subject 

of the abolition of suttee with much pleisure, and shall 

make suitable arrangements to prohibit the practice within 

the districts of my State. 



Seal . 



Translation of a Note addressed by Maliiraval Gooman Singjee 
to A. Remington, Esq, Officiating 1st Assistant Political 
Commissioner for Guzerat and Resident at Baroda, dated 
Chaitar Vad 5th Samvat 1896. 

After recapitulation of the contents of the note addressed 
by the Officiating 1st Assistant Political Commissioner on 
the subject of the arrangements made by the Gaikwar 
Government to abolish the rite of sati in its territories on 
the 3rd April 1840, the Maharaval states as follows: — 
Having taken into consideration the subject brought to my 
notice regarding the abolition of sati, 1 shall, agreeably to 
the suggestion contained in your note, enjoin ifcs discontinuance 
in the State of Oodeypur. 

4 ' Seal. 



TREATIES — PREVENTION OF SATI. 



287 



Translation of a Note addressed by Maharaval Pirthirajjee, 
of Deogirh Baria, to A. Kemington, Esq., Officiating 1st 
Assistant Political Commissioner for Guzerat, dated Chaitar 
Vad 11th Samvat 1896. 

Having taken into consideration the subject brought 
to my notice regarding the abolition of suttee, I shall enjoin 
its discontinuance in my towa and villages and piohibit its 
future observance. 



Seal. 



Translation of a Note addressed by Maharana FuttehSingjee, 
of Lunawara, to A. Remington, Esqr., Officiating First 
Assistant Political Commissioner for Guzerat i dated Chaitar 
Sud 15th Sam oat 1896. 

Having taken into consideration the subject brought to 
my notice regarding the abolition of suttee, I have, confirmably 
thereto, issued a proclamation to inform the people residing 
in my districts, and will further make suitable arrangements 
in the matter. 



Seal. 



Translation of a note addressed by Rana Bhowani Singjee 
of Stmth, to A. Remington, Esq., Officiating 1st Assistant 
Political Commissioner for Guzerat, dated 12th May, 1840. 

Having taken into consideration the subjeot brought 
to my notice regarding the abolition of suttee, I will make 
arrangements in my territory to prohibit the future observance 
of suttee. 

Seal. 



288 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Translation of a Note addressed by Thakor Jalam Sing, of 
Bhadarwa, to A. Remington, Esq, Officiating 1st Assistant 
Political Commissioner for Guzerat, dated Chaitar Sud 7th 
Samvat 1896. 

Having taken into consideration the subject brought 
to my notice regarding the abolition of suttee, I will 
agreeably to the wishes of Government, prohibit suttee in 
my territory. 

(Sd.) Jalam Sing. 



Translation of a Note addressed by lhakor Sardar Sing of 
Wankaner, to A Remington, Esq., Officiating 1st Assistant 
Political Commissioner for Guzarctt, dated Vaisakh Sud 
7th Samvat 1896. 

Having taken into consideration the subject brought 
to my notice regarding the abolition of suttee, I will prohifc 
the practice in my districts and make suitable arrangements 
for its discontinuance. 

(Sd.) Sardar Sing. 



Opium k 

Translation of Opium Agreement entered into by the States 
of Rewa Kantha in the year 1882. 

1. Hereafter we shall not at all cultivate poppy nor 
iallow it to be cultivated. 

2. We shall purchase and import op'um for our own 
consumption, and for that of the people of our 

■ Talukas, from the Government Depot at Ahmedab^d, 

or from such other place as Government rn*y appoint 
for that purpose. 

3. We shall allow opium to be sold at the same rate at 
which it may from time to time be sold in the 



TB1ATIES— CPIUM. 28fr 

Government district?, and shall never allow it to be 
sold at a cheaper price. 

4. We shall not allow the importation into our Talukas 
of smuggled opiam, that is, opium on which the 
Government duty has not been paid, and as iu 
consideration of the ahove, Government has kindly 
granted us remission of the duty payable to Government, 
we bind ourselves as stated below. If we do not 
act in accordance with the above conditions, Govern- 
ment may cancel the grant of the remission. 

5. We shall without fail submit every six months, in 
such form as Government may direct), a statement 
showing the quantity of opium purchased, sold, balanca 
remaining in hand, etc , and shall c^u^e accounts 
thereof to be kept in such form as Governmant may 
direct. 

B] As Government have directed that the above rules 
should come into force from 1st October 1878, we 
have hitherto brought them, and shall hereafter 
bring them and cause them to be brought intoforo* 



OPIUM (1882.) 

Translation of agreement passed by the Thakors of Sankhed* 
and Pandu Mewas {including Bkadarwa and Uwethi). 

We submit that the allotment of opium free of duty 
which has been made by Government for the use of ourselves 
Hvd cur subjects is very small. On this subject we had a 
consultation with you and after consideration agree that 
Government may make arrangements, as specified below. 

Government to appoint a licenseholder for the sale o£ 

opium in the Mewas, who should keep detailed accounts 

at every one of the shops, which may be fixed with our 
concurrence. Duty according to these accounts on the sales 
made at the shops for eich taluka for our own consumption 
37 



290 RBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

F??' rt > •■■;•.. . •• ; ; •-;■ 

an<J of our subjscts should be paid to us at the rate which 
may be fixed per pound from "iiinia to tiche I for the levy of 
duty. We should be allowed to take copies ofthe accounts^ 
We shall nob give the licetisehotder appointed by Governtfbnt 
the profit whiGh Will accrue to him abhve' the Government 
rate ; ? Government should therefore fix the alI6lha3nt of 
opium for our own use having regard to our cDttsuftptioti ; 
we shall not exceed the allotment fixed. 

We aoree to the above terms: therefore G>veram o, nfe 
should kindly make arrangements accordingly, in order that 
the doubts of Government as to the consumption of opium 
may ba removed, and we m^y continue to receive the duty 
on consumption. 



FINAL AGREEMENT REGARDING OPIUM SIG^D BY 

} ALL STATES (1896-97.) 

Agreement between the Politic d A^ent, Rewa Kantha. 

acting under the authority of His Excellency the Governor 

of Bombay in Council on behalf of the British Government, 

and the Raja of. ...on behalf of himself/ his heirs and 

successors' "regarding the manufacture, consumption * and sale 
of (jpium in the ^i..v..rSfcaie;-- 

Whereas in accord&ncS With" -the existing relations 
bwetwsen, the British ^iverojmeati and the..... #; ^SM^; tfcufY 
cultivation of < poppy aid the^ mi-nufaoture ,; of, n opium, . **ra 

prphibited in the.,, State, and no opium may be consumed 

in the said. State ot ier chin opium on which there 

has been paid to the British Government the duty at ' thV 
time payable to the said Government) in respect of opium 
consumed in the Presidency of Bombay; and wherea3 ia 

consideration of the covenants en the part of the 

hereinafter contained, the British Government ha* agreed to 
relinquish the whole amount of the said duty oq all opium 

that shall be hereafter conveyed into the said.. % . State 

£cr consumption therein ia accordance wibh the said covenants* 



TBSATIES — OPIUM- 291 

2. The Raja o£...St>ate agrees with the Bribish 
tjrovernment with reference to all former agreements on tha 
same subject matter as follows, vis: — 

(1) That the opium from time to time required for 
consumption within his territory Bhall be obtained 
in one of the three following ways only, namely: — ■ 

(a) by direct importation from Malwa and 
Rajputana ; or 

(b) by purchase in Bombay ; or 

(c) by purchase at any convenient opium depot 
of the British G)vernment. 

and that all opium so procured shall ba imported into, 
transported through or exported from British India, 
as the case may require, in accordance with the lav 
and rules regarding import, transport and export o£ 
opium at the time in force in the part of British 
India into, through, or from which such import, 
transport or export is necessary. 

(2) That he wi'I adopt such measures as shall from 
time to time appear to the British Government to bo 
necessary for effectually preventing any exporb and 
any illicit import of opium across his frontier ; 

(3) That the sale of opium within hi3 territory shall 
henceforward be conducted by licensed vendors only or 
departmen tally by State servants ; 

(4) That opium shall not be supplied to any of the 
said licensed vendors except on payment of a price, 
which is not less than the prioa at waich, at the tim9 
being, licensed vendors are being supplied in the 
British district of the Panch Mahals ; 

1 (5)' That no licensed vendors in his territory shall 
>'■* At any time be ; permitted to sell opium at a price 
which is lower than the lowest price at which' 4 ' licensed r 



29$ BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

vendors are. at the time being authorized to sell Jfe ia 

the British district of the Panch Mahals. ^ 

(6) That th9 system for the vend of opium ia his 
territory shall be henceforward assimilated ia its 
general features to that in force in the British district 
of the Panch Mahals ; 

(7) That he will forthwith introduce and enforce in 
his territory the regulations published under Government 
Resolution in the Revenue Department, No. 7207, 
dated 18th September 1895, and will hereafter from 
time to time adopt and enforce any change in the 
said regulations or any new regulation similar ia effect 
to any provision of the law or rules regarding opium 
for the time being in force in British India, which 
the Governor in Council of Bombay shall, in tbs 
interests of the British opium revenue, desire him to 
adopt and enforce ; 

(8) That he will famish every half-year on the 1st 
February and 1st August to the British Political 
^authorities of Rewa Kantha, in such forms as the 
Governor in Council of Bombay shall, after consulting 
the Commissioner of Customs, O )ium, &o. f from time 
to time prescribe, accurate accounts of the opium 
transactions of his territory. 

3. The British Government agrees that so long as the 
„,.. #ft .State uuly fulfils the foregoing covenants, the 

^whole of the duty payable to the British Government on 

any opium conveyed into the territory of. , ## . ia 

accordance with the relations between the British Government 

and the said as recited in the preamble to this agreement, 

shali be remitted, or if duty has already been paid on any 
such opium as if the same ware to be consumed iu the 
Presidency of Bombay, then that the whale of che amount* 
o£ the duty which has been so paid shall be refunded to the 

-*• •••«—• State. 



TREATIES-— ABKARU 293L 

Provided that nothing in this agreement shall affect 
the ultimate right of the British Government as paramount 
authority, on occasion arising, to alter the rate of duty 
or the proportion thereof to be remitted or refunded under 
this clause, and that no such alteration shall release the 

said Raja of.., State from any of the civenants performable 

by him under this agreement. 

5 And it is farther agreed between the parties 
hereto that in this agreement the word " opium " shall have 
the same meaning as in the Opium Act [I of 1878 ] or in 
any other law regarding opium £>r the tima being in forca 
in the Presidency cf Bombay, 

Dated this day of 1896-97. 



ABKARI (1891-92). 

Agreement passed by the Thakors of Sankheda and Pandn 
Mewas and the Thakors of Bhadarwa and Umetha. 

I Thakor Of 

intheRewa Kantha agree that the management 

-of the Abkari revenue of ray Svasthan shall be carried on 
in accordance with the Abkari Act of 1878, or any other 
enactment which may hereafter be introduced in its stead 
in the Bombay Presidency. 

CLAUSE 2. 

In order that the Abkari Administration of the said 
taluka may be carried on in accordance with thi provisions 
of the Bcmbay Abkari Act, I Thakor Shri Hathisingji 
Jetsingji agree to assign the management of the Abkari 
revenue oi my taluka from 1st January 1888 to 31st 
December 1897 and to accept in consideration thereof a 
yearly compensation of Rs. 1,087-13 10, the amount ao fixed 



294 BEWA KANtHA DIRECTORY. 

being made up of tbe average of the liquor revenue in cash^ 
together with the value of the liquor received by the^ 
Darbar for its own use during the pasb ten years plug a 
sum equal to twenty-five per cent of the same on account of 
a prospective increase of revenue during the terms of the 
lease. I am to receive the said amount in two instalments 
of Rs. 543-14-11 each, payable on 10th July and 10th 
January every year. 

Kvplanation.—ThQ lease mentioned in this agreemer t 
includes the ripht to levy duty on country liqinr and toddy, 
and the right to grant permission for the manufacture and 
sale of th8 same and to make inspection. 

CLAUSE 3. 

The management of the Abkari revenue cf the sa ; d 
taluka during tne term of the lease shall be carried on by 

officers appointed by Government, subjecb to the following 
rules : — 

(a) There shall be a uniform rate of duty on liquor 
in the said taluka and the British territory 
adjoining thereto. 

(b) The facilities for the supply of liquor for the 
use of the subjects of the said taluka shall be 
similar to those in the adjoining British 
territory. 

(c) A uniform price shall be fixed for liquor sold 
by ietail in the said taluka and the adjoining 
British territory, so that the subjects of either 
of the territories may be induced to tctch liquor 
from the other by reason of its being sold there 
on cheaper terms. 

CLAUSE 4. 

But in matters relating to Abkari management such 
as the determination of the number and : sites of liqadr 



TREATIES — ABKARI. $9S 

shops, the selection of retail sellers, &c, the officers 
appointed by Government shall, during the term of the 
lease, consult the saii Thakore Shri Hathisingji Jetsingji of 

the said taluka and pay regard to his wishes. 

CLAUSE 5. 

The ownership of palm trees and other toddy producing 
trees and of places where such trees are grown shall not ba 
deemed to have been transferred to the British Government 
under this lease, but the Government may exercise such 
control as it seems fit on toddy traffic. No kind of 'tax, 
however, shall be imposed on toddy -or. toddy trees without) 
the consent o£ the Thakor of the said taluka, and in ease it 
is resolved to levy any such tax, the residue of its income 
left after deducting the expenses of recovery shall be, made- 
over by the Government to Thakor Shri Hathisingji Jetsingji, 
of the said taluka. , 

CLAUSE 6. 

I Thalvor . .., .;;;.... .........:..agre^ 

assistance in the matter of giving effect to the Abkarl' ' £ctT 
and rule?, and also agvbe on bshalf of myself, my heirs and 
successors and my subordinate ... officers, to,/»$ftdei* -every 
possible assistance,, in ■» presenting;" the illegal * possession, 
manufacture, sale and transport of liquor under the same 
Act and the rules made thereunder; and the possession of 
materials and implements ior the manufacture of sitoh liquor^ 

CLAUSE 6 (a}. 

I Thakor ... ... ; ... further agree 

that during the period of the lease no kind of duty or other 
due shall be levied on liquor allowed to be manufactured, 
transported, or conveyed from one place to another within 
the limits of the taluka or on materials brought for the 
manufacture of the same. 



*&6 BEWA KANTHA DlRKCTORT. 

CLAUSE 7. 

Offences against the Abkari Act shall be dealt with? 
like other offences under Section 51 of that Act, by the 
local Criminal Court according to its power?. 

CLAUSE 8. 

During the period of its lease an account of the 
Abkari revenue of the taluka shall be kept separately frana 
that relating to the adjoiniug British territory, and the same 
Mall be annually furnished for the information of the Thakor 
of the taluka. 

CLAUSE 9. 

At the conclusion of the present term of the farm, it 

shall be renewable, at the option of the British Government^ 

for a further period of 6ve years upon the same conditions 

as herein stipulated On the expiry of the renewed term 

of the farm cr in the event of the British Government 

declining to exercise the option of renewal, then on the 

expiry of the original term of ten years, the management of 

the Abkari revenue JfiH revert to the Umetha Tbluka or 
Svasthan. 

CLAUSE 10. 

I Thakof,*. ••••••«*«•«• ••••••„.•.. agree on behalf of 

myself, my heirs and successors that in case the management 
of the Abkari revenue of tft* taluka is restored to me *s 
aforesaid, the same shall fc» carried on in accordance with 
the following rules : — 

(1) The management shall conform to the law and 
rules relating to Abkari which may be in forc» 
in the adjoining British territory (collectorates\, 

(2) The rate of duty on liquor shall be the same as 
that which might be levied in the British 
territory. « 

(3) The management of the said revenue shall be 
so carried on as not to affect in any way the 



TREATIES— ADOPTION • 



29* 



Abkari revenue of the adjoining British territory 
and the advice of the Political Agent, Rewa 
Kantha, shall be taken, when neoejsary, in this 
behalf. 

But this clause shall not bind the said Thakore. ........ 

„... c to make any arrangement) 

whereby icjury may arise to the lawful rights and revanue 
of the taluka, and it is presumed that the management of 
the Abkari revenue of the Collectorates shall be so conducted 
as to cause no injury whatever, to the Abkari revenue o£ 
the taluka. 

CLAUSE 10 (a) 

In this agreement the word " Collectorates " shalt, 
unless a different meaning is intended, be d?emed to include* 
any Native State adjoining the said taluka in which thd 
management of the Abkari revenue is carried on direct bjT 
the Bombay Government, or in accordance with the rules* 
prescribed by them. 

This agreement is accepted to-day, the 28th October 
1891. 



I I EP H i m l 



ADOPTION. 

Adoption Sa?iad granted to the Chief of Rajpipla in 1861. 

Her Majesty being desirous that the Government of 
the several Princes and Chiefs of India who now govern- 
their own territories should be perpetuated, and that the 
representation and dignity of their Houses should be continued^ 
I hereby, in fulfilment of this desire, convey t:> yon the 
assurance that on failure of natural heirs, the adoption by 
yourself ani future Ru!ers of your State of a succBssor 
according to Hindu Ltw and to tha customs o£ your racs 
will be recognized and con6rm**d. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb th% engagement 
thus made to you so long as Your House is byal to th^ 

• ' 38 ' ' "' *' * "■' 



298 BEWA KANTHA DIRHCTOBY. 

Crown and faithful to the conditions of the treaties, grants 
or engagements which record its obligations to the British 
Government. 

(Sd.) Cannikg, 
Viceroy and 
Governor General c£ India. 
tort William. The 11th March 1892. 

Note. — Similar sanads were granted to the Chiefs of 
Chhota Udepur, Baria, Lunawada and Sunth by Lord 
Lansdowne on the 23rd June 1890. 

In the case of Balasinor similar sanad with the 
following alteration in words was also granted at the same 
time. 

For the words " the adoption by yourself and future 
41 Rulers of your State of a successor according to Hindu 
4 g< L*w and to the customs of your race will be recognized 
and confirmed," were the words, " any succession to the 
" Government of your State which may bo legitimate 
" according to Mahome Jan law, will be upheld." 

RAJPIPLA. 
Shrek Mhalsa Kaunt 

Irandadon of a Parte nah from Anand Rao Gaikwar Sena* 

Khas Aheyl bhumsher Hah door to liana Kooer Par lap Sma $ 

of the capital of Rctjghur, l8l0. 

After complimeuts; — Your father, Ramsing, of Rajghur, 
<!oes not conduce himself properly, and in consequeuce many 
quarrels exist, and your bherhaoce is in danger of being 
lost to you. In consideration of this the Sirkar has 
thought proper to make arrangements that you be invested 
with inclusive authority to conduct the affairs of the State. 
The came being determined on, this par wan ah is given to 
you. Your father Rain si Dg is a man of bad conduct, end 



TOTATIES— BA JPIPLA* 2 99 

listening to bad counsels is planning means whereby to 
involve the welfare o£ the State, wherefore you are invested 
-with the executive management of affair?. You are, however, 
to transact} all business, and execute all deeds in the name 

of Ramsing. You are also to transact 
Sicca 

business by means o£ Kisanda^ Buckshee 

without whose knowledge you are to execute no public measure. 
You are likewise to institute such means as will preserve the 
ryots from suffering tyranny and trouble, and to obey the 
Sircar, continuing to pay the Sircar its dues and claims 
according to existing agreement. 

You will ako tettle the debt owing to Myral Naraia 
by your government. 

Moideen Jemadar being well disposed to your State, 
extend to him the same indulgence and protectioi in his 
services to your government. 

You will arrange respecting a provision for your 
father, and take such measures as will prevent him from 
exciting disturbances. 

Do you continue to conduct yourself as I erein provided 
for : in any default in the administration of affairs you can 
not prosper. Consider this and act according to the letter 
of tbe Sircar, and you will suffer no unjust trouble from 
the Sircar, acd in behalf of which, and consistent witb 
justice, it Las nominated Mr. Carrac on the part of the 
Honourable Company as guarantee. 

Bone Samvat 1866 llagh Vad 8th, Eijn 22nd 
Mohurrum, corresponding iciih the English year 1810, 21 ih 
^February. 

Note. — The Bombay Government agreed to guarantee 
these arrangements, but in consequence of tbe desth o£ 
Ram Sing, the guarantee was never actually affixed to tie 
San ad. 



~300 BKWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



IFranshtion of an Agreement entered into by Maharana 
Verisafjee, Raja of Rajpipla, and James Willi *ms, Esq., 
Resident at Baroda on the part of the Hon lie Company h 
1821. 



Seal 
of the 

RAJAH 



My representation is as follows :— 

I have received possession of my country from the 
Gaikwar Government, but I am certain that without) the 
aid of the British Government I shall not be abla to make 
its settlement: therefore I myself and my father, both of ua 
of our own desire, do agrea to act upon everything relating 
to the settlement of all the afiaxsofmy country^ in confirmity 
with the adyice of the Honourajle Company, Whatever 
may be tie deiire of the Government I will act aocrding 
to it. Iq continuity with this agreement whoever may be 
Chieftain of the country from generation to generation he 
will act. 

Dated Samvut 1878 Assoondee, reckoning from the 
month of Assar Aswiti fcojdh the L5th, corresponding with 
October thellih, a. d. 1821. 

Signature of the Raja. 



Translation of a Bond signed and delivered by Maharana 
Verisaljee, Raja of Rajpipla, d^ted at Nandod, the 10th 
Falgwt tSud, Samvat 1897, A. D. 20th February 1823. 

Contents. 

We have of our free will agreed to pay yearly at 
Baroda to the Gaikwar Government for yearly jummabundee 
and ghasdana the sum of Rs. (65,001) sixty-five thou and 
and one. 

The three villages in the Thana of R >ond, viz. let, 
Roond ; 2nd, Jehoor ; 3rd, Kotara, and the Z.k*ut ( inlaod 



TREATIES — BAJPIPLA. 3W& 

clutiea), and the five dumaJla villages, Wurkavi, Poicha, 
Washna Huddabhag, and Kokulpore, aud Roond near 
Bhalod, and the sirpao yearly payable to us from the- 
Gaikwar govern uenb and the town of Birun bsing all 
deducted, the sura total Rupees (65 001) sixty-five thousand 
and one is settled; the insUl moots to be paid in the months 
of Pos, Falgun, Caaitar and Bysack. In this manner from 
generation to generation year by year, tha subs shdl ba made 
good under the mediation cf the Honourable Cjnapany and no 
deviation occur. On all matters of the above-mentioned 
Talooka whatever discussion on matters good or bad may 
ame, these shall be referred to the mediation of tha 
He nourable Company, and we shall remain satisfied therein, 
nor shal there ever be a departure from this agreement. Thia 
we have written and signed. 



translation of a Grant of yewly allowances from the Raja 
Verisal of Rojpipla to Runi Surojkunvar Bai dated of 
Nandod, the 10th FJgun Sud, Samvut 1879, A. D« 
February 20th, 1823. 

To Surajkunvar Bm Maharana Verisal Raja of Rajpeepla, 
hrs written and delivered the illustrious Giikwar government* 
aid the HDnourabb British Govemmant having in th^ 
performance of justice decided the sovereignty of Rajpeepla. 
to be ours, and in their beneficence conferred entirely the 
honour on us, therefore we bestow upon you and on P*rtat> 
Sing and others under your protection a yeirly gift at ths> 
rate of Rupees (700) seven hundred par m:>nth, total rupees* 
(8,400) eight thousand four hundred, as follows:— For your 
private expenses Rupees (200) two hundred per month* 
yearly Rupees (2,400) two thousand four hundred, and 
Wulligam, in the Kuntaul pargunnah, and Syaligam, it* 
the Ruttunpore pargunnah ; whatever produce is darivabla 
from these towns is yours, and the towns delivered to you* 
*nd t us monthly allowance and the produce of the town* 



302 BKWA KANTHA DIRECTOBY. 

remains yours for life ; and for Partab Sing and the rest ffc 
monthly allowance of Rupees ^500) five hundred shall be 
regularly given, making a yearly total of Rs. (6,000) sir 
thousand ; at the rate of Rupees (8400) eight thousand 
four hundred a year, as it has been agreed upon and engaged 
to you so shall it be given, and do you continue to go oa 
as you have written to us ; in this matter no ehanges 
«hall occur ; this we have written and signed. 

To Maharana Verisal, Raja of Rajpeepla, Bai 
SurajKunvar Bai writes: — I am content ta receive the yearly 
allowance and provision made for me and Pertab Sing and 
others under my protection through the mediation of tha 
Oaikwar Government and by Mr. Williams on behalf of the 
British Government, and will remain satisfied, nor have I 
any further claims whatever for myself or for Pertataing oa 
the above mentioned tenitary or the government thereof; 
thus have I written and signed. 



Translation of an Agreement entered into by Maharana 
Verisal, Raja of Rajpipla, on 26th November 1823, 

Formerly a dispute existed regarding the right to the 
gadi of my chieftainship, on which account the two great 
Sircars of Shrimant Gaikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 
Bahadoor aad the Honourable Company Angrez Bahadoor 
having investigated the same decided my claim to be just,, 
confirmed it, and delivered over to me the chieftainship. On 
this account, I, of my own understanding and free will and 
pleasure, subscribe to the underwritten Ai tides of Agreement 
for my good behaviour :— 

ARTICLE l. 

On the above mentioned chieftainship are debt* due to 
the Gaikwar Sircar and to others. I have not means to 
hefit the whole of this burthen, which i* known to the 
Sircar. But whatever order I shall receive from the Resident 



TBEATIES — EAIPIPLA. 30ft 

at Baroda on the part of the Honourat h Company to» 
mdopt any plan for the liquidation of the Gaikwar debt, I 
*will agree to, and act in conformity with the same. 

Whatever proportion of the resources of the State may 
be fixed to defray the expenses of the State at any time by 
the advice of the Resident, and an or.Jer given upon thfr 
subject, in conformity with it I will abide. In this I wilt 
tnake no difference. 

ARTICLE 2. 

A separate bond has been given regarding the annual 
-ghasdana and jummabundee to be paid to the Gaikwar 
^government according to which I will pay the sum. If in 
jear an Asmani or Sultani misfortune shoulJ really occur,. 
then the Sircar, out of compassion, will m*ke a remission 
in the tribute of that year according t:> the custom of the 
country. 

ARTICLE 3. 

The Company'e Sirc«r has stationed in the above- 
chieftainship a detachment of its sepo/s for my protection. 
For the expenses of the same in whatever m^nusr the 
Sirkar in**y direct, 1 will agree, and pay in conformity witb 
the gam . 

ARTICLE 4. 

The Bheels and Mewasees of tho above taluk* shall 
not ccmmit any disturbances in the districts of the Gaikwar 
to the north and south of the river Narbad&, nor in the 
Khalsa districts of the Honourable Company, or in their 
dependencies. I will ke^p the arrangements with then* 
binding. In the above province from every village fael 
Ziiuin security has been t*ken for its good behaviour. If 
any vilhge has been omitted, security shall be taken from 
it and a proper settlement be kept. If any disturbance or 
injury is suttainad, and the game should bo proved mgainsb 



304 BKWA KANTHA DIRECTORY, 

any of the inhabitants of my province, I will answer for; 
the same, or cause an answer to be given for it. 

ARTICLE 5. 

I will not harbour nor allow any ona to harbour in 
my taluka disturbers of the public peace, Me^asee?, the' 
criminals cf both government?, ard Barwuttias. I will not, 
nor shall any other person, associata with them. 

ARTICLE 6, 

I will not commit acts of aggression against any one* 
If any dispute arises between me anl any other talukdar or 
aftmindar, I will mnke the same known to the Company's 
Sircar, 8nd whatever order it may give respecting it, I wilfc 
abide by it. 

ARTICLE 7. 

No one shall molest travellers passing and repassing 
through tVe lim r ts of my talukas. I will take care that a. 
proper settlement is made on this point. 

ARTICLE 8. 

In the above province reside Rajpoots and Grassias, 
, who possess Giras rights upon the Company's districts ii* 
the Zillas of Broach and Surat. Regarding these papers of 
agreement were taken from them by Mr. Willoaghby, 
Assistant to the Resident. Whatever final settlement of 
these may be mad6 in conformity with the same, 1 will 
cause them to abide. 

ARTICLE 9. 

In. conformity with the order of the Company's Sircar,. 
opium shall not be clandest nely conveyed within the limits 
of my province by any merchants or travellers, concealed m 
any otber merchandize, without the seal and order of the 
Siikar, I will keep a gcod arrangcmeLt in this respect i^ 
Bay taluk*. If any opium is clandestinely conveyed, I will 



TR1ATHBS— BAJPIPLA. 305^ 

.... . .. , . ... .... . y,r>\ 

seize it, and make the sama known to the Sircar ; whatever 
order the Sircar may give relating to the opium arrangements,- 
I will abide by. 

In conformity with the above written nine Articles I\ 
will always act from generation to generation; if in this 
respect any difference arises, I will answer for the sam^ . 
My taluka is security for my acting in conformity to what 
is written above. What is written is true. 



Raja's seal 

and signature. 



Translation of an Agreement passed by Maharana Shree 
Verisaljee, Raja of Rajpipla, to His Highness Gunpat Rao 
Gaikwar, dated tamvat 1909. Kartik Wad 1st, Saturday 
corresponding with 28th November 1852. 



Seal. 



After compliments :— I am a half sharer in some of 
the villages tinder the Rund parganah, in consequence 
of which the ryote and other causes give rise to constant 
disputes. With a view too avoid the same, I begged the 
Sircar, through Kamdar Dhuneshwar Wishwanath, tomske 
over to my management those villages in the said parganah, 
over some of which your Highness possessed, half and on 
others entire jurisdiction, as wall as the Custom Nakas at 
Nandod and other places, with sole authority over tham, in 
lieu of which I would pay the Sircar annually a sum to be 
fixed by Your Highness, that I would give up tp Your 
Highness my right of criminal administration,, &c , ovar the 
village of Karnalee, which at present, n dividei between m9 
and the Sircar, and Your Highness should therefore fix an 
amount equal to my half sfyare in the village* and the 
same should be deducted from that sum .whujh the? Sircar 

39 



806 BBWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

should fix to be received from me for the villages now ia 
the Sircar's possession, and the remainder would annually b& 

given by tne to the Sircar. This request of mine the Sircar 
was pleased to accede to, and I thereupon entered into this 
agreement, the conditions of which are as follows : — 

ARTICLE l. 

I have given over to the Sircar, to their entire 
management, my half share of jurisdiction in matters of 
criminal administration. &c, over the village of Karnalee, 
and I have now therefore no right whatever in the 
jurisdiction &c. of the village, except that I am only to 
receive annually a sum on acouau of the revenues of my 
half share, and which by taking the averag3 of ten years* 
receipts is fixed at Rs. 575-8-0. This will be deducted from 
the fixed amount of the revenuas of those ol the villages 
in the Bund parganah which the Sircar have given to 
me, and of which a detail is givan in the following Article, 
and the balance will annually be paid by me to the Sircar. 

ARTICLE 2. 

A list of those of the villages in the Rund pargamh, 
over same of which half and on others entire jurisdiction 
has been exercised by the dircar, and which Tour Highness 
has made over to my management with sole criminal 
administration over them, as well as of the Custom Nakas 
also given to me. 

Villages over which His Highness the Gaehwar exercises 
entire jurisdiction. 

1. Thana Rund ; 8. Jeyor ; 

2. Mouza Kotara ; 4. Bharna; 

Villages over uhich His Highness ths Gaekicar exercises 
half jurisdiction. 

1. Mouza Poicha ; 8. Rund. parganah Bhalod. 

2, Vawja-Nana; 4. Kakulpor. 



TREATIES— BAJPIPLA. 307 

Custom Nakas. 

I. Parganah Nandod ; 2. parganah Bhalod ; 3, 
parganah Panetha; 4 parganah Gowalee ; 5. the custom 
derived at L&dba's Naka in the village of Kotara. 

Spirit shops. 
Thana Rand ; 2. Mouza Kotara. 

The abjve villages, custom nakas, and spirit shops 
have, with the entire jurisdiction over them, been made over 
to me by the Sircar. By taking the average of ten years 
including both civil and criminal receipts, the annual income 
thereof amount? to Rupees 1.4,187; from this t& to be 
deducted the revenues of my half share of Karnalee, as 
stated in the 6rst Article, amounting to Rs. 575*8 annually, 
and it leaves a balance of Rs. 13,611-8-0. Out of this Your 
Highness having kindly remitted Rs. 260-8-0, there remains 
a net balance of Rs. 13 351, which, I will, without any 
objection or advancing a c!aim for remission on account of 
heavenly or earthly calamity, pay in one item on every 
Maha Sud 15th.* To ensure a regular payment of the said 
amount, I have obtained the Honourable Company's 
guarantee. The management of the aforesaid villages will be 
conducted by me in tbe same manner as w<*s done by the 
Sircar. No new customs oppressive to the ryots will be 
introduced. The Sircar should pay the Hakdars and others 
the amounts of their respective haks which may have 
been included in the above fixed sum. On the transfer to 
me by Your Highness of tie above-mentioned villages, the 
Sirkar will cause marks to be laid down to distinguish the 
boundaries of Your Highnesses villages, so that no dispute 
may in future take place regarding land and render it easy 
to conduct the management according to the boundaries so 
laid-down. 

'% This date, will .occur either in February, or March, ,. 



308 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

ARTICLE 8. 

There are several mutual disputes existing regarding 
* boundaries, also about lands and Giras of the Ryots; to 
effect a settlement of the same the Sircar should depute A 
confidential Kamdar, who, in conjnnotion with one on my 
i part, will, aft9r examining the documentary proofs on both 
sides, as well as bearing in mind the past management, 
make proper arrangements, and when once the marks are 
laid down, there will not remain any more dispute. 

ARTICLE 4. 

No protection will ever be afforded in my territsry to 
the Sircar's offenders. If land or other mutual disputes 
hereafter occur, they will b9 settled by attending to the 
proofs and tae existing management on both sides, and no 
disputes will be entertained without any just cause. 

ARTICLE 5. 

Whatever direction the high roads usually take alter 
passing the Nakas which the Sircar have entrusted to me, will 
hereafter be continued. If it is usual for the goods to pass 
to and from the Sircar's territory through the above Nakasr, 
I shall never, with tae intention Co shut up those roads, 
form new ones in my territory, and if the Sirkar's Nakas 
suffer by my doing so, I will pay the 103S that may bs done. 

The above is agreed to. 

Samwat 1909, Kartik Wad 1st, Saturday. 

(In the Rojas hand "writing). 

Signed as above my own signature. 



Seal. 



Endorsement by the Resident. 
The above agreement has been passed by the R*jpipia 
j Raja to the Gaikwar Government. According to the 2nd 
-Article thereof the above Raja agreei to 'pay a sum of 



TREATIES — RAJPIPLA. 



M 



Rupees 13,351 tQ the Gaikwar. A latter No. 5006 of the 
12th November 1852 has been received from the Bombay 
Government, regarding a guarantee to the above arrangement. 
The guarantee of the Honourable Company regarding thft 
above Rs. 13,351 is hereby given. 

Dated Baroda, 2nd (3d.) J. M. Davies, 

December 185t Resident. 



Translation of a tfael Zamin Bond by Coovera Wussawa of 
the Sakhbara Parganah, with Maharana Verisal, Rajah 
of Rajpeepla, on the part of himself and other villages of 
the above parganah subject to his authority, $c, <J*c, Ms 
brethzrn, all those icho reside icithin the limits of his 
parganah Dhalora (or those who bear any kind of arms), 
ryots and all who reside in the district of Sakhbara, of hi& 
own free will, dhted the 9th Maha Sud % Sumwat 1878> 
corresponding with the 31st January 1822. 

ARTICLE 1. 

I myself, my brethren, and all who reside in the 
villages of my parganah, will continue to reside in them, 
and remain in obedience to the orders of the Sircar, the same 
as ryots. 

ARTICLE 2. 

An exemption was anciently made from paying revenue 
from my parganah Sakhbarra, but the ancient vera ( or 
taxes), dand faroi (or fines levied from criminals) &c, &c, 
and other levies, small or great, formerly paid to the Sircar, 
I will now pay. The customs of the parganah of Sakhbara 
belong to the Sircar, and will be collected by his Thanadar* 

ARTICLE 8. 

I will always obey the thanas which are now placed 
by the Sircar, and if any other t baa as may in future remain 
or be sent, I will always pay obedience to the ordera they 
*n*y give me. 



310 *BWA KANTHA DIBBCTORY. 

ARTICLE 4. 

If I have become possessed of any village or land by 
force, or unjustly, I will restore it by the order of the Sircar. 
In future, I will not take possession of any village or land 
by force ; but if any one is willing to giva land to me, having 
informed the Sircar that such is the case, and having 
obtained its order, I will take it. 

ARTICLE 6. 

Whatever I justly owe, or whatever is justly owed to 
me, or whatever just right I may possess, whatever boundary 
dispute may arise relating to me, whatever claim I may hava 
in the territories af the Honourable Company, in those of 
the Gaikwar Government, in those of the Rajpipla government, 
or in any other districts, wherever they may b3, I will make 
the same known to the Sircar, and I will agree to whatever 
settlement it may make, and take accordingly. I will not 
distress the Patel or ryots of any viilage parbhara (or directly) 
nor take more than may be fixed by the sircar, nor occasion 
any additional expense to any village beyond that fixod by 
the Sircar. 

ARTICLE 6. 

If from this time any robbery shaU be made in anjr 
village, or any injury be offered to ryots, marchanta or 
travellers, and it is proved I am concerned or in fault, I 
will give a satisfactory answer to the Siro*r. 

ARTICLE 7. 

I will seize any refractory persons, robbers, Barwatias, 
who may go out with a gang with the intention of committing 
depredations, plundering on the highway, or to commit 
thansa, who may enter any place situated within my 
boundaries. If they are too strong for me, I will without 
delay give the necessary information to the Sircar, and having 
obtained the assistance of the Sircar, will seiza them. I will 
not join any robbers or Barwattias, neither will I give them 



TRB1.TIES— RAJPIHJU 311 

a hukah or wat r, nor allow any one to do so. I will not 
give them a resting place, or food, nor allow any one else 
to do so. 

ARTICLE 8. 

I£ any new persons, either a relation or a Pardesi 
(or a person belonging t3 any place situated out of his own 
territory) may some to reside in my village, having taken 
security from him, I will allow him to tak p up his residence 
If any fault shall be proved against him, I will produce him 
before the Sircar. If it is proved that I secretly allow any 
person to remain, I will give »u answer to the Sircar. 

ARTICLE 9. 

I will not entertain in my service any Pardesi (foreign) 
Sibundy, either horse or foot. If it shall be discovered that 
I do so, I will give an an3wer and will agree to whatever 
punishment the Sircar may impose upon me. 

In conformity with the iabove written nine Articles, 
which I have given, I will continue to act ; if in any respect 
a difference occurs, I will give an answer, together with the 
expense of Hoz Mohsali, and whatever punishment it may 
please the Sircar tJ infliob, I will oonsent to. Besides the 
above, I will act in conformity to whatever orders may be 
issued by th9 Sirkar, for which Mylo Wussawa, of the 
village of Rumalpuru, and Katria Wussawa, of the 
village of Samkari, are my perpetual J?ael Zamin security : 
they will observe this themselves, and make me to do so. 
Kano Fakiro Wassawa, of the village of Varaduvas in the 
Broach Parg*nah and Manglo Wussawa, of the village of 
Durupuli in the Sakhbara parganah, are arrzamin ( or 
counter security). 

9 

Declaration made by the persons who ham become 
counter security. 

We, of our own free will, become arr-aamin, that ia 
Conformity with what is written above, we will give ma 



+ 


his 


mark. 


+ 


his 


mark. 


+ 


his 


mark. 


+ 


his 


mark. 


+ 


his 


mark. 



312 BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

answer, or cause one to be given, year by year, always as 
long as the authority of the Honourable Company, that of 
the Gaikwar Sircar, that of the Raj Sircar. &c , &o., shall 
continue to exist. 

(Sd). Wussawa Coorji Omud 

„ "Wussuwa Mylo Poonja 

„ Wussawa Katra Hudua 

„ Wussawa Kano P^kiro 

„ Wnssawa Monglo Deevalu 

Arr-Zamin. 

Translation of an Agreement entered into by Coveeree* Wassawa 
with J. P. Willoughby, Esquire, renouncing all claim to 
the Ghunwali Khuntee on condition of receiving a 
pecuniary commutation from the Gaikwar Government for 
the sum of Rupees one thousand per annum, dated Samvat 
1881, Chaitar Vad the 5th, corresponding with the eighth 
of April 1825. 

I will never commit any depredation or dispute in 
the territories belonging to the Honourable Company, to the 
Gaikwar, to Rajpipla, or in any other taluka (district), bub 
will pursue a peaceable mode of life. On this point I formerly 
gave a writing to government, with security for my good 
behaviour, which still continues in forca. The Gaikwar 
authorities at present collect the Khun tee of Ghoonwalee at 
Songhur, the half of which belongs to me. I entrusted the 
settlement of this claim to Government, promising to abide 
by ita decision respecting it. Upon this, Government in its 
beneficence hive agreed to obtain from the Gaekwar 
government Rs. (1,000) one thousand per annum, iu 
commutation of my half share of the Khuntee in question. 
To this settlement, of my own free will and phasure, I 
agree ; from this time I will not make auy dispute or 
depredation in the territories of the Honourable Company, 
the Gaikwar, Kajpipla, or any other district, bat will., live 
quietly, performing service according to the oVders ^ of 



Government; if any infraction of t&is agreement arises, I 
shall be an offender against Government, and if- fcr my 
offence Government should confiscate my wafctan ( entire 
estate) and Giras, I relinquish my claim to the same. I 
agree to this stipulation for the satisfaction of Government 
and for my acting in conformity to this engagement, and 
pursuing a peaceable course of life, the seouritios given to 
my former engugements are in force. They cause me to 
answer for myself or give an answer for me. 

(Sd.) WUSSAWA, COOVEBREA OWED. 

Witness : 

(Sd.) Abdullakhan Ballochi, 

Jamadar. 



CHHOTA UDEPUR. 

Translation of an Agreement entered into by the Raja of 
Chhota Udepur, Kartich Sud 7th, November 21st 1822. 

The Raja of Udepur acknowledges that under the 
protection of the Honourable Company's Government, he has 
subscribed to the yearly payment of ghasdana to the 
Gaekwar Government, and that the following are the articles 
for regular and systematic proceedings in future :— ■ 

ARTICLE 1. 

The Bheels or Kolees of the aforesaid taluka shall in 
no case com oi rt any injury to the Sankheda or Tiiakwara 
or any other parganah3 belonging to His ^ Highness the 
Gaekwar, or to any taluka or town under the protection of 
the Honourable Company. This engagement is to be kept 
{n.ost rigidly, and in case of any depredations being committed 
and proved, the Udepur Chieftain to answer accordingly. 
40 



3|f KBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

ARTICLE 2. 

The irregular, quarrelsome Mewaasis, disobeyers and 
ratels against Government, incendiaries ( Birwattia ) and 

others of such character, shall nob be sheltered, nor allowed 
to be sheltered in the Udepur parganah nor any assistance 
be afforded them. 

ARTICLE 3. 

No private quarrels shall be allowed to be prosecuted; 
but if any talukdar has any difference with any Z*mindar, 
the same shall be referred to the Honourable Company's 
Government, and the decision thereupon be final. 

ARTICLE 4. 

The public roads through the limits of the Udepur 
Taluka shall be protected from all interruptions of commence 
or risks cf personal safety, 

ARTICLE 5. 

It is most strictly agreed to for this Taluka that, ia 
conformity with the orders of Government, no opium shall 
be allowed to be smuggled, without the seal and pass of the 
Honourable Company, in the baggage of any travailing 
merchants ; and if any opium is found attempted to be 
smuggled, the said opium shall be seized and reported fr> 
Government and disposed of agreeably to the orders then 
received. These are the five Articles of Agreement, by 
which affairs are in future to be guided, and in case of any 
breach of these engagements the Udepur Caiafcaia biuJs 
himself to answer the claim. 



Translation of a Paper addressed to the Sircar by the 
Chieftain of 'Udepur, Jiaja Rawal Pirthiraj, dated As* 
Sud 10th Samwat 1878, 28th June 1822. 
Of my own free will and inoliustion I have agreed to 

make good yearly and pay through the mediation of tha 



TBBATIES — CHHOTA UDEPUR. 



3l« 



British Government the sum of rupees ten thousand five 
hundred (10 ; 500) to the Gaikwar Government, in the same 
manner that this ghasdena has been hitherto paid in Baroda. 
From this agreement there shall be no departure, and 
everything that concerns the above taluka, either good or 
bad, shall be transacted through the mediation of the 
British Government, and I will remain a servant of the 
Company, nothing contrary to this shall be done; to this I 
affix my signature. 

Translation of the Parwanah given by His Highness Siajee 
Rao Gaehwar Sena Khas Kheyal Shamsher Bahadoor to 
the Raja of Chhcta Udepur Maha Rawal Firthiraj dated 
the 2nd of the 2nd Aso Vad, or 15th of the month of 
Suffer {October 31st. 1822.) 

Ghasdana is due from you to the Baroda Government, 
and it i9 agreed, under the mediation of the British Govern- 
ment and through the intervention of Mr. Williams, the 
Resident at Baroda, that the above bo the amount of Rs. 
ten thousand five hundred yearly shall be paid by instalments 
as hitherto, and if at any time you suffer through the 
inclemency of seasons cr foreign invasion, then the Baroda 
Government shall exercise protection in the same manner 
that is agreed upon for Kathiawar and Mahikantha. 

Therefore remain at ease in your mind that no injustice 
shall be attempted against yon, and attend to the improve- 
ment of your taluka, and your Agents, and Earbbaris 
Gokal Bakshi and Sadaram Dubba and ,B*b& Mathur and 
Parbhoodas Vanravan Parekh and others, when comin^ or 
going on business connected with your .government, shall 
suffer no kind of interruption or injury; for this protection, 
which is binding year by year for ever, ' the Honourable 
Company is guarantee. 

Signed with both the seals of the Gaekwar Govern- 
ment. 



01$ REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Translation of a letter from J. P. Willoughby Esq, First 
Assistant in charge of the Residency, to Maharawal 
Pirthirdj, Raja of Mohan, dated 11th December 1822. 

After compliments: — Your letter of Bhadarwa Sud 
the 13th sent to Mr. Williams, the Resident, was delivered 
by your agent Moro Pant, and its contents are understood. 
The yearly payment of Ghasdana to the amount of Rs. 
(10,500) ten thousand five hundred the aforesaid Karkun 
has paid for the year 1878, and has received receipts for the 
Warats, which will be delivered to you, and respecting this 
said sum of Rupees (10,500) ten thousand five hundred, you 
have agreed to send your Agent yearly to pay the same 
in Baroda under the mediation of the British Govern iient, 
as it has been paid hitherto, and pledges of good behaviour 
have also been given by you, on which account the Gaekwar 
Government has given the Parwanah for the perpetual 
guarantee of the British Government; therefore, be confident 
that so long as you fulfil your engagements, you need apprehend 
no failure of these promises ot protection. 

(Sd.) J. P. Willoughby. 

BARIA. 
Agreement between the British Government and Maharaja 
Pirthiraj, Kaja of Baria, his heirs and successor s, concluded, 
in March 1824, by Captain A. Maconald on the part of 
British Government and by Rawed Jeejeebhai on the part 
of the Raja of Baria. 

ARTICLE l. 

The Raja Pirtbiraj having agreed to pay the British 
Government an annual tribute for its protection will make 
do delay or evasion in fulfilling his engagement. 

ARTICLE 2. 

The British Government, in consideration of the debts 
of the petty State of Baria, will accept the sum o£ Shalito 



Shaee Rs. 12,000 annually as tribute for six years, from 
the year Samvab 1880 (corresponding with A. D. 1823 24) 
to Samvat 1886 (corresponding with A. D. 1829-30). 

ARTICLE 3. 
This tribute shaU be paid by instalments as follows :~- 
For the year Samvat 1880 (A. D. 1823-24), 
Shalim Shaee Rs. 12,000. 

First instalment, Shalim Shaee Rs. 6000, to b9 paid 
in Asad Sud, Samvat 1881 (corresponding with July 1824) % 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rs. 6,000 f to be 
paid in Kartik Sud Samvat 188 i (or November 1824). 

For the year Samvat 1881 (A. D. 1824-25). 
Shalim Shaee Rs. 12,000. 

First instalment, Shalim Shaee Rs. 6,000, to be paid in 
Asad Sud Samvat 1882 (corresponding with July 1825). 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rs. 6,000. to be 
paid in Kartik Sud, Samvat 1882 for November 1825). 

For the year Samvat 1882 (A. D. 182526). 

Shalim Shaee Rs. 12000. 

First instalment, Shalim Shaee Rs r 6000, to be paid 
in Asad Sud Samvat 1883 (corresponding with July 1826). 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rs. 6,000, to be paid 
ib Kartick Sud SamYat 1883 (corresponding with November 
1826). 

For the year Samvat 1883 (A. D. 1826-27), 
Shalim Shaee Rs. 12,000, 

First instalment, Shalim Shaee Rs. 6,000, to be paid 
in Asad Sud Samvat 1884 (corresponding with July 1827). 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rs. 6,000, to be 
paid in Kartik Sud, Samvat 1884 (corresponding with 
November 1827). 



318 KBWA KANDITHA RECT0BY. 

For the year Samvat 1884 (A. D, 1827-28), 

Shalita Shaee Rs. 12,000. 

Fir9b instalment, Shalim Shaee Rs. 6,000, to be paid 
in Asad Sud, Samvat 1885 (or July 1828\ 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee R?. 6,000, to be paid 
in Kartik Sud Samvat 1885 (or November 1828). • 
For the year Samvat 1885 (A. D. 1828-29), 
Shalim Sbaee Rp. J 2 000. 

First instalment Shalim Shaee Rs 6,000, to be paid 
in Asad Sud, Samvat 1886 (corresponding with July 1829). 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rs. 6 000 to be paid 
in Kartik Sud, Samvat 1886 (or November 1829). 

ARTICLE 4. 
After the expiration cf the period above mentioned, 
the tribute shall be increased in proportion to the amount? 
of the revenues. 



Rawal Shri 

Prathiraj Gangadasj 

constant servant of 

Shri Ram. 



Maharaj Shree Pirthiraj Gongadasji, in 
the hand-writing of Rawal Jeejeebhai. What 
is stated above is binding. , 

Confirmed by the Governor-General in Council on the 
20th April 1824 

Signature cf Jeejeebhai, Kamdar. 



Engagement entered into by Rnjy, Ptithising, of Baria, and 
Kamdar Rawal Jeejeebhai with Captain Alexander 
Macdonald on the part of the Honourable Company— 1824. 

I agree of my own free will to pay to the Honourable 
Company, without failure, exclusive of the fixed tanka, the 
sum of Rs. 500 per mensem or R3. 6.000 per nunum, for 
the maintenance of the cavalry and infantry stationed with 
me for the protection of the country. Besides tbis sum the 
established tank* will be regularly paid by instalments. The 



TREATIES — BARIA^ 319 

pay of the horse and foot, am ranting to R*. 500 par 

mensem, to commence from 1st January 1824 or Samvafe 

1380. 

Dated 24th February 1824. 



Articles of Agreement concluded between the British Government 
and the Stxte of Baria for the remission of the tribute 
payable by the Baria State — 1892. 

Preimble. — Whereas the Stite of Baria is hound by a 
Treaty-, dated 20th April 1824, to pay to the British Govem- 
mant a yearly tribute of Shalim Shahee Rs. 12,000; And 
whereas the Raja, Mahar&wal Shri Mansingji, has prayed 
the British Government, bo tor9go the said tribute, and 
shown cause therefor ; And whereas the British Government 
is willing on certain conditions tj accede t:> tie Rajt's 
prayer; the following articles are, in this vie*, agreed upon 
between Maharawil Shree Mansiajfji, Raja of Baria, on 
behalf of himself, his heirs an! successors en the on* part, 
and A. C. Logan Esq., Political Agent, Raw* Kantha, for 
the time being, on behalf of tae British Gjvernm^nt on the 
other : — 

ARTICLE 1. 

Transit dutm are for ever abolished throughout the 
Baria State, and no duties under the name oi export or 
import or any other designation, sftiil be exacted from 
goods which enter, pass through, and leave the State limits 
without any material trade traiuaation taking placa in regard 
to them. 

ARTICLE 2. 

The road from the Railway station at Limkheda to 
Jhalod, as far as the frontier of the Baria State, remains 
in charge of the British Government for maintenance and 



320 BEW4 KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

repair, and will so remain until the British Government see 
fit to hand it over to the Baria State. 

ARTICLE 3. 

The British Government will levy tolls on the road 
described in the preceding article in accordance with the 
British Law, regulating such levy at such rates as it shall 
think proper. No cese of any kind shall be levied by the 
Baria State on this road, and the tolls of the British 
authorities shall be restricted to the amount required for 
purposes of maintenance and repair. 

ARTICLE 4. 

The Baria- Asadi road, and the Baria portions of the 
Godbra, Dohad road, not forming part of the Jhalod-Limkheda 
road, as described in article 2, all of which have been 
hitherto maintained by the British Government, are made 
over to the Baria State, subject to their being maintained 
and repaired to the satisfaction of the Political Agent. 

ARTICLE 5. 
The Batia State will institute a fund to be called the 
Baria Public Works Fund, to which all road-tolls collected 
throughout the State will be credited. The Baria State 
will also make a yearly assignment to the fund of Rs* 
12,500 (British currency) out of its general revenues. 

ARTICLE 6. 

From the aforesaid fund the State will pay annually to 
the British Government, the amount by which the tolls 
levied on the Jhalod-Limkheda road, as described in Article 
2, fall short of the upkeep of the road within the limit of 
Rs. 1,500. The fund will also provide for the maintenance 
of the roads described in Article 4. 

ARTICLE 7. 
The balance of the fund, after meeting the aforesaid 
charges, will be spent exclusively on objects beneficial to the 



TBBATIKS— BABIA.' 3fcfc 

subjects of the Baria State, such an roads, wells, tanks, 
revenue survey, and the construction and repair of buildings 
of general utility. 

ARTICLE 8. 

Wherever road- tolls now exist or may hereafter be established 

in the Baria State, they will te regulated by a law in 

accordance with the British L*w on the subject of road-tolls. 

ARTICLE 9. 

Tolls will in no case be levied in excess of the amount 

required for the repair of the road on which they are placed. 

The full rates of toll permitted by the British Law will be 

levied only on roads which have been both metalled and 

bridged. For bridged roads not metalled, or for metalled 

roads net bridged, the tolls wi'l not exceed one half of those 

rates. No toll will be levied on roads which are neither 

metalled nor bridged. No second tolls will be taken on any 

road, the length of which is less than 20 miles. The looatioa 

of the tolls and the rates to he levied at each will bs notified 
in a manner to give them fall publicity. 

ARTICLE 10. 
The British Government releases the Bari% State from 

its obligation to pay tribute so long as these several condition* 
are observed. 

ARTICLE 11. 
On the same terms tbe Baria Tiibute Fund is abolished. 

The Chauth, which is due from the Panch Mahal District 

to the Baria State and has hithertD been credited to the 

Tribute Fund, will be paid to the Baria State and may be 
credited to its general revenues. 

Executed at Godhra, this 12th day of September, one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

(Sd ) Mansinoji Prathirajji. 

Raja of Baria. 
(Sd.) A. C.'-Lcxmn, 

Political Agent. 
Approved and confirmed by His Excellency the Viceroy 
and Governor-General <f lidia. 



Simla, 
2he^4th Mctober\ 
1892. 
41 



(Sd. H. M. Durand, 
Secretary t'6 the Gdvenmetit 
of India, Foreign Department 



$2$, KBWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

LUNAWADA. 

Engagement of protection from the British Government given 

to the Chief of Lunawada by Major Alexander Walker, 

Resident at Baroda, under date the 27th September 1803. 

This is to certify that the Rana Pratap Sing, Chief 

of Lunawada, having applied for the Honourable Company's 

protection, and having, by the friendly intercourse of letters, 

declared that all his means shall be employed to promote 

the destruction o£ Kanuji, I have, at his request, and in 

consideration of the above circumstances, granted to him 

this writing, which will entitle him to the friendship of the 

English and of their ally Anand Rao Gaekwar. 

Should the English troop3, in prosecution oftha war 
against Kanuji, enter the territories of the Raja of 
Lunawada, they will refrain from doing the inhabitants any 
injury or molestation : on the contrary, they may be assured 
o£ protection, the Raja on his part ordering his subjects to 
furnish provisions and whatever may be required, which will 
be punctually paid for, according to the custom and good 
faith cf the English. 

This writing is on tbe opposite side translated into 
Maxathi, that the officers of tbe Gaekwar Siroar may also 
extend their friendship to the Rana Partabsing. 

Done at Baroda, (Sd.) A. Walker, 

27th September 1803. Resident at Biroda. 

Approved by the Governor in Council of Bombay oa 
,5th October 1803. 



Treaty concluded with the Raja, of Lunawada, 1803. 

In virtue ot the authority which has been vested ia 
Colonel John Murray, commanding the British forces ia 
Guzerat Attaveasee, and districts conquered from Dowl&t 
Rao Siadhia, to ratify and conclude a treaty of amity wibb 



TfcEAUlES— LTOAWAD A/« 



U& 



we, on the basis of friendship, and on those terms 6t 
reciprccil benefit "which had been previously acceded to 'cm 
my part, and recommended in my behalf by Colonel Murray 
during his continuance in the Lunawada district, and anxious 
to profit by the friendly protection which the Honourable 
Company Bahadoor bas been graciously pleased to extend 
towards tine, I do, of my free will, and in conformity to the 
terms previously agreed to, hereby erter into or confirm the 
following conditions, namely : — 

ARTICLE 1. 

First, as tributary to the % Honourable Company 
Bahadoor, I hereby engage in consequence of their gracious 
concession, in my behalf, of the tribute hitherto usually paid 
by me to the late government of Dowlat Rao Sindhi*, to 
maintain, at my own expense, devoid of ev^ry claim to 
remuneration from the Government of the Honourable 
Company Bahadoor, a military f ;rce for the defence of my 
territories, the services of which shall be at their command, 
in repelling every attempt hostile io their interests, by an 
invasion of the Guzerat through my districts; and I hereby 
engage to relinquish all claim to indemnification for any 
injury myself or subjects may sustain, in our persons or 
property by these efforts agiinsfc the ominon enemy, 
Considering, en all occasions, the enemies of the Eaglish as 
my own, and pledging myself to defend my country against 
them to the last extremity; further engaging to give such 
tolen of allegiance as His Excellency the Governor-Genecal 
may be pleased to require. 

ARLICLE 2. t) 

Secondly I engage, on all occasions, to be* answerable 
for the safety of tl e property and persons 'of the British 
Government, its servants and subjects, wherever they may 
be now or hereafter ip my districts, and relinq ash all 
claim to remuneration tor their services from the governments 



324 RBWA K4NTHA DIRECTORY. 

as far as relates to them or those in their service ; bat 
with respect to their subjects, I reserve the right of taxing 
merchandize and exacting payrcnat, according to anoieab 
custom, foe the protection which I haraby engaga to give 
the merchants. 

(Sd.) J. Murray, Colonel. 
Concluded, camp Lunawxdco, November l4th t 1803. 



Translation of an Agreement passed by the Rand of ' Lurwwadu 
to the Gaekwar Government. 

1. Rana Pateh Sing, of the Taluka of Lunawada, do 
of my own free will admit that whenever the army of the 
Sircar came into these parts, the ghasdana and khirajab 
used to be discharged according to the running account. My 
villages were in this way distressed and the population 
decreased. Therefore, as the Sircars army having baen to 
Kathiawar has made an equitable perpetual settlement 
according to the amount of the former payments, I, in like 
manner, for my own tranquility, hive passed a writing in 
which the sums due for ghasdana and khirajat are included 
in one item. A separate bond for ten ye>trs on this subject 
has been passed to the Sircar. Aooordiug to the condition 
of it I will send a Kamdar every year to Baroia and 
discharge the amount. Tuare saa'l b3 no daviatian from 
this agreement. I, my sons, and their demandants fiooa 
generation to generation, as rnaiy as shall tmuaj;a Lranawaia, 
will for ever abide by the above wr<ttan agreement. A 
separate perpetual security band has been passai which is 
to be abided by. Tnere is to be no deviation frooa Dais If 
a deviation shoull take place, I am an offender against the 
Sircar. This writing is true. Simvtt 1869, Chaitar Sui 

14th. 

Rana Fatteh Singjee, 

Signed by the hand of Mehta Nana Iohharauu 



TREATIES — LUNAWADA. 32* 

"Translation of a bond passed by Jassu Phtdjee BhcU y of 

Moonda, to the Gaekwar Government. 

I, o£ my own free will, pass this agreement to the 
Sircar on the subject of the ghasdan* and khirajat of 
Futteh Singjee, Rana of the taluka of Lunavada, from 
Samvat 1868, for ten years, viz., the ghasdana and kharajat 
together are fixed at Rs. 7,001 for one year. The Kistbandi 
has also been settled, and according to this I will every 
year settle at Baroda, and will pay the money according to 
the Kistbandi. If by tha will of Gjd the payments shall be 
made four days sooner or later, interest shall be given at the 
rate of 1 per cent per month. 

Particulars of the Kistbandi. 

1st Kist to be paid on 2nd Magsar Sud I Rupees. 
2nd do do. 2nd Maha Sud J 7,001 

According to this arrangement the money will be paid 
year by year. I will pay it regularly for ten years. If the 
periods of payment be extended, interest to be paid as 
above mentioned, and if a Mohsal come from the Sircar* 
Mohsuli and Kharch and tha pay of a Kassid to be 
discharged. This writing is true. 

(Sd.) Bhat Jusu Phuljee. 

Sarnvobt 1874, Chaitar Sud 14th. 
The above written is true. 



LUNAWADA AND SUNTH. 

Agreement concluded with Mansing Patunkur $ dated the IQtk 
August 1819. } 

As Mansing Patunkur haa repeatedly and earnestly 
entreated the aid of the British Gtavaramant to effaco a jush 
settlement of his tributary claims from taa patty stitat of 



326 RBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Suntti-Rampur, and Lunavada, in consideration of th© 
friendly relation subsisting between the British Government 
and the Maharaja Dowlat Rao Sindhia, and with a view to 
the preservation of peace and tranquility, and the restoration 
to good order and eventual prosperity of the principalities 
of Sunth and Lunavada, both of which have been and are 
Btill so distracted by intestine commotions, and so harassed 
by foreign troops as to be in danger of utter desolation. 
Brigadier General Sir John Malcolm offers to the consideration 
of Mansing Patunkur, the following conditions, assuring him 
that upon these terms only will the interference of the 
British Government be exerted in his bbhalf: — 

ARTICLE 1. 

The British Government will guarantee to Mansingrao 
Patunkur, as long as he is authorized by his Prince Dowlafc 
Kao Sindhia to receive it, his annual tribute from the States 
of Sunth and Lunavada, amounting to Babashaee Rupees 
19,000 per annum, of whieh sum the State of Sunth pays 

Babashaeo Rupees 7,000, tnat of Lunavada Babashihee 

Bupses 12,000, This tribute will commence with the year 

Vikramsjit 1876 or A, d. 1819-20. This tribute, the total 

sum of which is Rupees 19,000, shall be paid in two 

instalments, viz , iu Magh Sud Poorun Masee corresponding 

with December A. D. 1819 Rs, 9,500 and in Jesth Sud 

Poorun Masee, corresponding with April 1820, Rupees 

9,500. The British Government will also guarantee to 

Mansing Rao Patunkur bis arrears of tribute for the year 

1875 or a, D 1818-19, from the above mentioned State of 

Lunavada, amounting to Rupees 700, if, on inquiry, the 

demand prove just. This arrear to be paid by instalments of 

which the dates will be fixed hereafter. The period of 

liquidation nbt/ however, to exc&ed two years. 



TREATIES— BALASINOIU 3iT 

ARTICLE 2. 

Mansing Rao Patunkur must immediately withdraw all 
his troop3 of every description, as well as all his Karkuns 
and offioer3 ; from these states, and on no acaount for the 
future exert any interference, either directly or indirectly 
with the affairs or with the government of Sunth aud 
Liunavada. 

ARTICLE 3. 
Mansing Patunkur must relinquish, in fav>ur of the 
Raj*s of Sunfch and Lunavada, all chims to the villages he 
now demands, viz. 70 from Lunavada and 42 from Sunth, 
which villages, it is acknowledged, have been forty years in 
their possession. 

The above Articles have been agreed upon and settled 
this 10th day of August 1819. 

BALASINOR. 
translation of a icriting from the Chieftain of Balasinor to 
the Collector of Kaira, dated 30th August 1820. 

The Sircar has been pleased to furnish me with copies 
of the Opium Regulations, viz., Ragulation I, 1818, and 
Regulation II, 1820. According frj these enactments, I shall 
iu my villages regulate the opium. Should any person, 
however, in breach of thu H^nourab e ompiuy's R*gulatioas, 
import opium, I conseat th*t any one on tha pirb of ths 
Honourable Cxupany rruy sszj ths sams in my t*luka. 

I shall make the Honourable Company's Regulations 
known to my ryote and take care that they are respected. 

Besides, as to the opium required for the internal 

consumption of my country, the people of my taluka shall 

bring it from such depot as the Sircar may prescribe, and 

sell it by retail, according to such rule3 as may ba ia Fore* 

in the Honourable Company's districts. ^ 

(Sd.) by Wusoo Maxmuiwlr. 
on the part of Babi Abad Khan jSalabtit &haBL ' 



328 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTOBY. 

Adoption Sanad granted to the Nawab of Bala&inor— 1890. 

Her Majesty being desirous that the Governments of 
the several Princes and Chiefs of India who now govern 
their own territories should be perpetuated, and that the 
representation and dignity of thsir houses should be continued, 
I hereby, in fulfilment of this desire, convey to you the 
assurance that, on failure cf natural heirs, any succession to 
the Government of your State which may be legitimate 
according to Mahommedan Law, will be upheld. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement 
thus made to you, so long as Your House is loyal to the 
Crown and faithful to the conditions of the treaties, grants 
or engagements which record its obligations to the British 
Government, 

Simla, (Sd.) Lansdowne. 

The 23rd June 1890. Viceroy and Governor- General 

of India* 

SUNTH. 

Treaty concluded with the Raja of Simth, dated the 15th 
December 1803. 

Trusting and believing in providence — 

I hereby declare that, desirous to embrace the very 
amicable offer made to ine by Colonel Murrey, conmanding 
the BritUh forces in the Gujarat Attavhesee, and conquered 
districts, on behalf of the Honourable Company Bahadoor, 
and to cement the friendship which afc present so happily 
exists between me and the Honourable Company's Government^ 
I have, in testimony thereof, of my free will and consent, 
entered into the following engagement with the Honourable 
Company Bahadoor, under whose protection it has pleased 
the Almighty to place me: — 



r TBEATIES-— SUNTH, 3£9 

ARTICLE 1. 

As tributary to Pawagad ard the Honourable Company 

Babadoor, I hereby engrge to continue the payment of the 

sume annual tribute as it ha8 been usual for me to pay to 

the late government of Dowlut Rao Sindhia ( namely Rs. 

2,700): but should it please the Honourable Company's 

Government graciously to release me in future from the 

payment of the aforesaid tribute, then I engage to present 

them annually with such nazsrana in token of my allfgiance 

as they may te pleased to direct, which shall be in lieu of 

all other sums whatsoever ; and as long as I continue faithfully 

to adhere to the interests of the Honouiable Company, this 

concession of the tribute to be paid by me, if ncceeded to 

by His Excellency the Governor General in Council, shall 

not be liable to be revoked. 

ARTICLE 2. 

I eagage, on every occasion to consider the enemies of 
the English as my own, and to the last extremity to defend 
my country, and oppose every attempt of a hostile nature 
which may be made by a foreign power for the passage of 
troops through my districts, and relinquish all claims to 
indemnification for any losses mjself or subjects may suffer 
on the occasion. 

ARTICLE 3. 

On all occasions when my country is threatened by a 
foreign force, either on account o£ my attachment to the 
British Government, or by people of my euemies, I shall 
receive assistance from the Honourable Company's Government 
to enable me to resist the enemy ; unless it should appear 
the invasion is intended merely to puni'sh ins a e ordinate 
subjects of mine, who may have violated my neighbours' 
boundaries, when I agree to adopt -such measures a$^ may 
satisfy the aggrieved. - r --. , V. > i ^ ; v^ 

42 



330 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

ARTICLE 4. 

I engage, on all occasions, to be answerable for fcte 
safety of the property and persons of the British Government, 
its servants and subjects, wherever they may be, now or 
hereafter in my districts* and relinquish all claims to 
remuneration for these services from tho Govemmant as fat 
as relates to them or those in their service. But witfi 
respect to their snbjects, I reserve the right of taxing 
merchandize and exacting payment, according to ancient 
custom, for the protection whLh I hereby engage te give to 
the merchants. 

(Sd ) J. Murray, Col n*i* 
Concluded, Camp Kaliban, 
December loth, 1803. 



MEWAS SETTLEMENT. 

Translation of a Fael Zamin Bond taken by J. P. WUloughby^ 
Esqr., for the Gaekwar Government, from Bajee Daima 9 
Vajao Daima, Me washes of Tilluckuiara, including their 
families , relations, and dependants , dated the 14th of 
Falgoon Sud 9 Samvat 188 1 corresponding with the 18th 
March 1825. 

In consequence of our improper conduct earning to the 
notice of Government, a force was equipped against us which, 
inflicted pnnishment upon us. Now fchroagh the beneficence 
of Government,, we have been . directed to reinhabio oar 
villages, and to conduct ourselves properly for the future, 
according to the orders of Government, after the manner of 
ryots, Agreeiug to this order, we, of our free will and 
pleasure, and in our right senses, sabsoriba to the under- 
mentioned articles of agreement :— 



TREATIES — MEWAS SETTLEMENT. S3l 

ARTICLE 1. 

We will reside in the country belonging to the 
Government, after the manner of ryots, and transact our 
business in an equitable way. We will not commit any 
depredations, or make any dispute, with any one residing in 
the districts of the Gaekvar Government, of the Honourable 
Compauy, of Rajpipla, Chhota Udeypur, Gad or any other 
Talukdar ; we will act in obedienca to the instructions of 
the thanas of Government which at present exist or may 
in future exist. 

ARTICLE 2. 

We will pay whatever revenue is due on account o£ 
the viPa^es of Tilluckwara belonging ta Government, and 
will pay according to the custom of the district the levies 
put upon Uparwaria land, beside salami and babtis 
according to annual custom. 

ARTICLE 3. 

We have given to Mr. Willoughby a written paper 
giving an account of our just rights lands and claims upon 
persons residing in the districts of the Gaekwar Government 
«nd Rajpipia. In whatever manner Governtosnt may arrange, 
such of these as on inquiry shall appear to be just, we will 
agree to the same, for ourselves and posterity from generation 
to generation ; according to this settlement we will abide, 
and receive whatever Government may choose to give us. 

ARTICLE 4. 

In several villages, we have lent money and taken 
writings for Giras in lieu thereof; we admit that we have 
no claim for the Giras in question, and we will agree to 
whatever arrangement Government may take for the repayment 
cf euch sums we have lent as on inquiry, may be found to 
bo jusb. From this time we will not make any dispute ion 



332 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

this subject with the inhabitants of the villages in question* 
In future, if any dispute arise? with any one regarding 
money transactions, we will petition the Government, and 
act according to its order respecting the same; we will not 
directly make any dispute in future with the inhabitants of 
the villages, and not take more than that awarded to us 
by tne Government arrangement, mr will we cause expense 
to fall upon any villaga ourselves direct. 

ARTICLE 5. 

We will restore whatever villages and lands, situated 
in the districts of Government, or id those of the talukdara, 
we may be found to have unjastly possessed ourselves o£ 
when Government gives an order to that efiect. In future, 
we will not, without the permission of the Government!, either 
take on mortgage, buy, or receive as a gifr, villages, lands, 
Pasaita, or Giras from any one. 

ARTICLE 6. 

We will not associ&te w th rebels and disturbers of the 
public place of the districts of the Gaekwar and the 
Honourable Company, ot Kajpipla, and the othsr talukdara ; 
we will nob afford them an asylum, or permit any one bo 
harbour tfcum in our villages, or give them food, or alloi? 
any cne to do so. If we &rj aole, we will seiz3 aud deliver 
them over to the custody of Government. If it is proved 
that we do associate with any person of the above description, 
we will become answerable for iha claims upon him, anl for 
a fire for doing so ; it any robber is tracad to our villages, 
we will carry on the trace to tue next village, and establish 
the same upon it, otherwise we will produce the criminal 
and resiore the property stolen. 

ARTICLE 7. 
To satisfy Government for the due performance of the 
above-written Articles, Bajae Daima agrees to reside at 
Jfo-oda for a period of fiva years from this date, living upea 



TREATIES — MEWAS SETTLEMENT. 33$ 

his own means; if ifc appears to the satisfaction of Gbver nmenfr, 
in the course of five years, that we act in conformity to the 
above-writtsn agreement, and no infringement of the same 
occurs, then whatever orders Government may issue regarding 
releasing the hostage, will be obeyed by us. In conformity 
to this writing he will remain as a hostage. 

In this manner seven articles of agreement have b3ei| 
written. It any infraction of the same takes place from this 
time, whatever punishmsnt Government mty award, we will 
agree to. For this agreement our Wattan (estate) andGiras 
is security; Rowjee Bawa, Genial Sing Bhirot, inhabitant of 
the village of Tanjoola, of the Baroda pargannah, h perpetual 
security both for our good behaviour, according to what is 
written above, and for our personal appearance ; and Rana 
Abhe Sing, of the Kasbah of Ahinod, and Rathor Saheb 
Khan, of Vajiria, are counter securities tor the same. In 
conformity with what i3 written abjva, they will act and 
cause us to act, they will be answerable for claims upon us 
and cause us also to be go. 

(3d ) For Bajke Daima. 

by the Mehta of Thalor of Ahmod. 

(Sd.) Veejjo ditto. 

„ Rowjee Bharot. 

f> Rana Abhe Sing # 
by his Karbhari Mehta Hurry Ram 
Dayaram and Rana Kesrea Sing 
Sajan Sing. 

(Sd.) Saheb Khan, 

Thakor of Vajiria. 



4*34 BEWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

Translation of a Memorandum from the Gaikwar Government 
being arrangements for the Settlement of the Metcasts of 
the Reiva Kantha, without date. 

1. The following is the list of the Mewasi Zamindam 
in the districts : — 

1. The parganah of Sihor contains Shanor and the 
three Mandwa towns', Mandwa, Nanderia, and half ths 
town of Chanod. 

2 The parganah of Sankhaira, Naswari, having 
twelve towns and four villages dependant, and Agar, consisting 
of Agar and Seisana. 

3. The parganah of Tillackwara, containing nine 
towns, as shown in the statement of the Kamavndars, 
Wajiria, Oochad, Chureswar, Palasani, Para, Biloria, Nallia* 
Balodra, Seeral. 

4. The parganah of Scwly. No statement has beea 
sent by the Kamavisdar of the district of the Zamindars or 
;the Mewasi villages ; therefore, when the return shall be 
made, the Zamindar and Mewasi villages therein shall be- 
included in the arrangements, to be coLtrclled in conformity 
to the five following artfclss. 

5. The ten Girasia villages termed Das Gam. 

For the abovementioned villages b • longing to Mewasi 
Zamindars, or if on inquiry, others should be found which 
have been overlooked, that is to say, for all villages that 
from any distant period have paid fixed revenues through the 
Zaminrlars, the following artichs are agreed to for the 

investigation cf their rights and their better Government; 

, AR1ICLE 1. 

In whatever town shall be found Talpat and Wanta. 
lands, and fremt any remote period the fixed revenue has 
been paid through the medium of the Z miodar, it is t> be 
understood that, from the circumstances of their being Talpat 
JancP, the town belongs to Government. 



TREATIES — MBWA.S SBTTIiBMENT. 335 

ARTICLE 2. 

If in any town Talpat ianJ shall be found which the* 
Zamindars hava united from any remote period with Wanta 
lands, and the revenues for past generations have been paid 
it* one sum, such towns are to remain in possession of the 
Mewasis, and the settlement of future revenue fco bo made ia 
the present investigations. 

ARTICLE 3 

In such towns as have been let on farm* by Kamavisdars 
to Zamindars, and retained by them without their having 
any just right to the same, and the fixed revenues paid by 
the Zamindars as fixed by the Karrnvisdars, such towns are 
not to belong to Girasias but to Government. 

ARTICLE 4. 

If any town has been from a very remote period ia 
possession of a Zamindar, and such town held by his 
ancestors or other Girasias, then, in consequence of such 
long possession, he shall be confirmed therein, and the 
settlement of the future revenue to be made in the present 
investigation. 

ARTICLE 5. 

If in any town the Zamindar shall possess Wanta 
lands, and hold also Talpat lands by the grants of forty or 
fifty years standing, or by grants from former Governments, 
by the production of such grants the town shall remain in 
possession of the Mewasi, and the settlement of future 
revenue to be made in the present investigation. 

In this manner is the revenue of the Mewasi Zamindars 
to be adjusted, but the half of Chanod now consigned bjr 
Government to the charge of a Kamavisdar is fe> remain aa 
at present. 



336 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

In settling the revenne from the Mewasi villages, a» 
Everage of the last ten years, including Kharajat, babtis, 
&c., must be fixed for a perpetual tribute, but in forming* 
the ten years average, no year of famine or invasion, must 
He reckoned, for if they be, it cannot be expected that in 
future years of calamity, a reduction can be consented to; in 
this manner the Agent is to make the settlement in 
communication with Gcvernment. 

When any Zsmindar is completely impoverished, then, 
in communication with Government, a five years agreement 
is to be made with him, commencing with smaller payments 
suited to his meats, until the fifth year when the lawful 
tribute is to be paid. 

If, however, any Zarnindar is so situated as that his 
affairs cannot be comprehended under either of the above 
previsions, then the Agent, in communication with Government, 
shall make the best arragements th t circumstances will 
admit, for a fixed perpetual revenue for the future. 

TJae following is the manner in which, in conformity 
tp the .settlement, the Mewasi Zamindars of the several 
parganas shall yearly give security to the Kamavisdars of 
the same to pay the revenue without any reduction : — 

1st. The Thakor towns belonging to respectable 
Zamindars, Wajiria. Sinor, Mandwa, Agar, Naswari, 
• • Falasani, : and Das Gam, total seven towns, and 
any other place held by any respectable Thakor 
shall pay revenue as fixed by the present settlement 
thioiigh the medium cf the Resident, year by year, 
to the Katnavisdar. : 

2nd. Tl?e EinaMcr Me*8see- villages must pay their 

;; ,: rev ; eru es as fixed by t^e present settlement to the 

Kamavisdar, and if any one <^elay payments, the 

Kamaviedar is to ; make it known to the Agent, and 

raise the money in cortmnnication with him. 



BBBATIES— MEWAS SETTLEMEKT. $3T 

2. The following are the articles of arrangements to 
be entered into with the Mewasis : — 

A. Whatever claim the Zamindars may have on the 
respective villages* under the several Jheads of Giras 
or Wanta or Dahu or Protection Money (Rakhopa), 
shall continue to be paid by Govemmert as they 
are now established ; they shall not be added to, 
and if any old or frivolous claims are advanced, if they 
are founded on precedents within the last ten years , 
they are to be admitted for investigation, and the 
Agent giving them due examination shall decide 
upon them ; but if the claim be of anterior date to 
ten years. Government! is not to be required ta 
answer them, and in whatever village the Zamindar 
receives the protection money, he is to protect it, 
and if the village sustain injury, he is to make 
good the loss according to the local customs in such 
cases. 

B. Arrangements for the protection of the villages ii* 
the districts from Mewasi Girasias :— 

(a) No Mewasi Zamindar shall afford protection to 
plunderers or robbers, and if thieves belonging 
to any Zamindar's village commit depredations* 
or outrages in the districts, and bss be thereby 
sustained, then the Zamindar guilty of having 
sheltered them shall make gr.od the losses so 
sustained agreeable to the custom of the country* 
unless he can prove that the thieves have passed 
on beyond his lands; if he can not do this, he 
must make good the loss. 

lb) The sums at present paid under t^e denomination 
of Giras are to be continued at the present 



" * For further measures taken for the, protection of these 
g^atanteed rights 'see Baroda Engagements. >. ,. , ..-,;„,. 
43 



338 RBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

rate; no exorticn or violence to be practised on 
the ryots on that account and reparation will 
be enforced for injuries, if any injury be done 
to the ryots. 

(e) In whatever towns belonging to Zamindars any 
Girasias may have fixed their residence, it is 
optional with them to remain and enjoy their 
rights at present enjoyed such as Giras, 
Ranwatta, Wechan and Pasaita; but they are 
not under these pretexts to advance additional 
demands or give vexation or alarm to the 
villages ; and if any injury be done by them to 
any village, the Zamindar who protects them 
wiil be compelled to make good the name and to 
deliver up the persons of the offenders. 

(d) The Mewasi Girasias having hitherto been 
constantly in the practice of carrying on private 
wars, one with ancther, this is to be discontinued, 
and the injuries to the peaceable villages 
consequent on such hostilities are not to be 
allowed ; no infringement of public peace will be 
peimitted to pass with impunity. 

(e) If people of disorderly habit3 belonging to 
Zamindai's villages enter peaceable villages for 
purposes of deprecation and any affray ensue, 
and any of the offenders fall, the villagers are not 
answerable for what is done in self-defence, and 
no compensation to be demanded from them, 

(f) The Zamindars in their respective villages are 
independent to entertain or discharge Rajputs, 
Kolis or others, or give then* Pisiita lands or 
monthly pay, or to invite settlers into their 
villages, bub if they discharge people o£ disorderly 
habits, their being let loose o& the country may 



TREATIES — MEWAS SETTLEMENT* 35$ 

be injurious to the peaceable distriots ; such 
people therefore, previous to being discharged, 
are to be bound over under double security to 
good behaviour, and in case of this being 
omitted, and their committing depredations, the 
Zaraindar, through whose neglect this befalls* 
will be made answerable for the consequences. 

3. The limits of the several towns in the districts as 
now received are to be continued, and if at any time or in 
any place, there should be boundary dispute* batwixt the 
Zamindar and Government villages, the oliims on both sides 
are to be made known to the Agent, who will settle them, 
after careful examination ; but if they can by mutual 
arbitration of Panchayat settle the dispute amicably, there 
will be no necessity for his interference in nutters of this 
kind. No injury or oppression is to be allowed against the 
Government villages, and if it shall appear that the Z*mind»rs 
have in any cass encroached or appropriated land * belonging 
to Government villages during the last five or ten years^ 
the enc r o%chments are not to be permitted and claims or 
complaints are to be adjusted by the Agent. 

4. The Zemindars shall continue in undisturbed 
possession of the Wanta rights they at present enjoy ia 
Government districts, nor Buffer any molestation on account 
of counter claims of Talpat, &c, but whatever villages pay 
Wanta are to pay the same to tho customary amount only,, 
for lands actually under the plough, and fees due to 
Government from l*nds of that tenure are to be paid as 
heretofore, and on all Wans a lands, whatever has been 
hitherto paid by the cultivating tenants respectively shall 
continue to be paid and no increase permitted, and in case 
of Girasias incurring debts to inhabitants of Government 
villages, or Zamindars dependent on government or merchants 
or others, and for the settlement of the Bame, or as 



340 BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

compensation for publio offences, shall assign their rights of 
Wanta, or the produce of Wanta or Giras, such shall be 
confirmed and no opposition offered to the arrangement* 
Precedents of former customs to be received as law, and 
if, on the other hand, Government Katnavisdars or villagers 
have encroached on lands belonging bi Zemindars within 
the last ten years, on their showing pr3ofs of the same, the 
Agent, in communication with Government, is to restore 
the same ; and if in the manner above described any 
Zamindars shall have assigned over Giras or Wanta rights 
to the government ryots, and cause molestation to the present 
possessors, the Agent is to examine into and decide on the 
claim. 

5. The Zamindars in their respective villages hold the 
government over the population of the same, but i£ they are 
guilty of oppression or injustice to respectable persons or 
Saukars or Brahmins, the same agreeable to custom is 
subject to investigation and to be settled. 

6. Whenever the royal retinue of this Government 
proceeds for religious ceremonies to the banks of the Narbada, 
the customary tribute (nazarana) and preparations are to 
ba expected from the Ztmindars, but if they are impoverished. 
Government will take it into consideration and demand less. 

7. The Zamindars are not in future to be allowed to 
obtain lands without approbation of Govarnmeat under the 
different denominations of Wichan or P<i3*ita or any other 
term, the Mewasi Girasias are a turbulent race, and their 
increase is to be deprecated ; this is to be made known on 
the part of G3vernmenfc to 4 the villages, 

8. The Zamindars are independent in their several 
villages, respecting Brahmins, Bh*ts f and other religious 
mendicants, as to their Pas ait a oralm3 to give or withhold 
the same, but they are not to deprive them of any ancient 
possession bestowed for charitable purposes. 



TREATIES— -MBWAS SKTtLfcMBIfrT. 341 

9. Sundry Brahmins and other traders in Chanod are 
wont to send woodcutters to the hills to cut timber, which 
is brought down the Narbada in rafts ; on this timber the 
Mewasis are to levy no more than the customary duties, 
for if additional duties were put on, the timber could not 
be brought, and injury would accrue to this Gavemment; 
therefore the Mewasee Zamindars are to be warned on this 
head. 

10. The Jamabandi dues leviad every alternate year 
by the Rewa Kantha Mulkgiri, including Kharajat, Babtis 
(extra levies ) of every description, are to b9 fixed in 
perpetuity upon those by whom they have hitherto been 
paid; respecting these written proofs shall be separately 
furnished. 

11. If any Mewasi Zamindar, being without offspring, 
wishes to adopt a child as his heir, he may do so according 
to law established, paying the customary fees to Government, 
and when any Zamindar dies, his heir, near or remote in 
relationship, may succeed, as has hitherto been the custom, 
the same being duly made known to Government. 

12. The district of the parganah of Sowli is given 
to Meer Umeenal Deen Hussain Khan as his jaghir for his 
Kisala, and the pargana of Tillackwara to Kam Rao Anajee 
as his jaghir for his Pagah, both districts being thus 
assigned to special purposes by Government in Dumala ; in 
case the Jaghirdars may show the wish to exchange their 
districts in consequence of the arrangements etc., with the 
Mewasis being in future to be transacted through the 
Agent, this will not be attended to; the respectable 
Zamindars are to pay their tributes through the Resident to 
these Jaghirdars, and the inferior Mewasi villages to pay 
theirs as already provided for. 



'«i ■»! 



•342 KEWA KANTHA DIBKCTOBY. 

KANJHAKI SETTLEMENT. 

Tra?islation of a Fael Zamin or Security Bond for good 
behaviour entered into with the Sircar Alijah Bahadur 
{Government of Dowlat Rao Sindhia) through the mediation 
of J. P. Willoughby, Esq. Political Agent on the pari of 
the British Government in the Province of Reiva Kantha 
and the Zillah of Pawagarh by Thakcr Kesri Sing Abhe 
Sing and his son Dip Sing, Proprietors of the Meivasi 
village of Kajnhari, of the Halol Parganah, dated 8th 
Mahc* Sud, Samwat 1882, 15th February 1826. 

We, of our free will and in perfect possession of our 
faculties, have entered into a bond with the Sircar, containing 
the under-mentioned Articles of Agreement, the same being 
binding in perpetuity on ourselves, our brethern and 
relations, on all inhabitants or persons bearing arms, residing 
within the jhampa or gates of the village or villages 
belonging to us, or outside in ( or their ) suburbs usually 
designated Mowada, Wara or Was: — to wit. 

ARTICLE I. 

We will conduct ourselves as peaceable ryots, observing 
respect to the ( Umal) authority of the Sircar (government) 
which has hitherto been established over the above mentioned 
village or villages, or lands under our management, and 
paying implicit obedience to its ( the government's ) orders. 
Whatever settlement the Saheb (or Agent) may make of the 
Jamabandi, babtis, ghasdana or other just claims hitherto 
paid by us to the Government, we will agree to the same, 
and in conformity thereto pay the amount year by year. 
We will, moreover, pay annually whatever Dan (taxes) it 
may have been the ancient custom to levy on Uparwaria 
land (situated in other villages) cultivated by us, or any 
salami which may be due upDn our Wanta or other la ids. 
We will also pay ( hakdar na hak ) the rights of individuals 
according to ancient custom* 



TREATIES — KANJHARI SETTLEMENT. 34& 

ARTICLE 2. 

We will reside in the country belonging to the Govern* 
ment after the manner of ryots carrying on each his owa 
proper trade or occupation and cultivating the soil. We will 
not live in enmity or entertain any dispute > or commit any 
breach of the peace with any one residing in the district* 
belonging to Government, to any talukdar or Zimindar; 
neither will we quarrel nor make disputes with one another* 
We will pay implicit obedience to the orders we may receive 
from those thanas ( detachments or troops ) of government 
which are at present or may hereafter ba established. 

ARTICLE 3. 

We will furnish to the Agent, a detailed account of 
all our just and ancient rights, Giras, Wantas, Dan and 
JRakhcpa dues, as well as of any claims we may possess upon 
any person or persons residing in the districts belonging to 
Government, to any talukdar or Zimindar, specifying the 
place or places from whence they may be due. We stipulate, 
for ourselves and brethern and descendants in perpetuity, to 
abide by whatever settlement the Agent may maka of such of 
these as on investigation may appear to be founded on 
equity; whatever proportion (of these rights) the Government 
may grant to us we will thankfully receive. If at any tima 
a boundary dispute shall arise between us and any one, wa 
will make the same known to the Agent and abide by any 
settlement of the same, which to him mny seem good and 
equitable. 

ARTICE 4. 

If we have obtained possession of any village or laud 
or Giras by advancing money on loan, we will abide by any 
settlement, which the Government may prescribe For the 
liquidation of such portion of such debt) as on enquiry may 
be found to be justly due. We renounce all olaim to such/ 
villages, lands, or giras, and will nob enter into any directs 



344 BBWA KANTHA DIBECTORY. 

discussion or dispute with their inhabitants or proprietors. If 
any dispute shall hereafter arise in our dealings and transactions 
with any cne, we will make Government acquainted with the 
same, and consent to abide by whatever settlement it may 
mediate. We will not enter into any direct disputes with 
the villages nor demand more from tbem than the award of 
Government, neither will we cause any extra expense to fall 
on any village. 

ARTICLE 5. 

If it should be made known to Government tLat \v$ 
have unjustly possessed onrselves of, or forcibly occupied. 
any village or land, we stipulate to make restitution of 
tho same on receiving directions to that effect. In future 
we will not possess ourselves of or receive any written 
deeds making over to us by sale, by mortgage, or by gift, 
any village or land or pasaita or giras without obtaining the 
previous sanction of Government. 

ARTICLE 6. 

We will net associate with criminals ( Apradhi ) or 
outlaws (Barvatias) from any of the districts belonging to 
the Government or to any talukdnr or Zamindar; we will 
not afford any asylum to any robber or disturber of the pnblie 
peace nor will we permit any one belonging to our village 
or villages to do so. We will neither ourselves give them 
food or a resting place, nor allow any one to do so. If 
perchance any persons of this description fall into our power, 
we will seize and deliver them over to the custody of 
Government. If we are proved to hold intercourse with them, 
we hold ourselves responsible for their persons and crimes, 
and liable to such fines as may be imposed on us. If 
thieves be tifac^d into our villages or within our boundaries, 
we will carry on the trape to another village and establish 
the theft oq it; otherwise we will produce the thieves and 
cause restitution of the property stolen to be made. We will 



BBKATIBS— KAKJHABI SETTLEMEHT. 34? 

neither assooiate with thieves, nor ourselves commit thefts. 
If any robbery or misdemeanour committBd by any other 
village comes to our knowledge, we will immediately inform 
Government of the same, or on failure of doing so answer 
for the omission and be subjected to a fine. If perchance 
any one belonging to our village proceed (with the intention 
to commit theft or any ether crime) to any village belonging 
to Government, to any Talukdar or Zamindar, we will answer 
for the same ; and should he be caught in the fact and 
happen to be slain, we renounce the claim called Ranwatia 

(blood-money) on that village, and will neither ourselves 
raake it nor permit any one to do so. 

ARTICLE 7. 

Should the Giras, Ranwatia, Wechan, or Pasaita rights 
of any Girasia who may be now residing or may hereafter 
come to reside in our villages, be interfered with or prohibited 
by any one, we will represent his case to the Government, 
and prevent his making any direct disturbance on the subject. 
If we fail to do so, and any injury ensues, we hold ourselves 
responsible for the same or to deliver up the Girasia offending 
into the hands of Government. We will also make such 
arrangements with all Rajputs and Kolis, who are now or 
may hereafter be in our employ as will prevent them making 
any disturbance in any place under pretence of any claims 
they may have on us so long as they may continue in, and 
after their discharge from our service, otherwise we will be 
espensib!e for the consequences. 

ARTICLE 8. 

Should we have appropriated any of our hereditary 
lands or pr>perfcy or coparcener's share, Giras, Wanta, or 
Pasaita rights, either in liquidation of debts, in Ranvatia or 
by fre6 gift, we promise not to resume such (assigned) without 
previously coming to a fair settlement of that debt or 
making a fair exchange. We bind ourselves not to interfere 
44 



346: BBWA ^ANTHA DIRECTOBY. 

with Or trcnoh upon such Giras or Aujda (provision or 
assignment), lands &c , whioh may in conformity to ancient 
custom belong to our brethern or other persons. In this 
respect we will make no change, but should any dispute arise 
in either of the above cases, we will represent the same to 
the Agent, and will conform to and abide by any orders we 
may receive on the subject consonant with justic9. We will 
not, moreover, injure or oppress unjustly any respectable 
bankers, Brahmins, or poor persons who reside in our villages. 

ARTICLE 9. 

We will not in any way molest merchants or travellers 
frequenting the country, but will efficiently preserve and keep 
the peace of the high way. Should any injury be sustainei 
(by them) within our limits, we will produce the person or 
persons who occasioned it or be responsible for the sama. 
We promise not tj levy more Gudhai, or other dues, from 
merchants than those which are sanctioned by long and ancient 
usage. Oa this point we will not enter into any further dis- 
cussion hereafter. 

ARTICLE 10. 

We will afford protection to any person dependent on 
or in the service of Government or to any detachmeats of 
Government troops (Sarinjam) who may halt within our limits, 
and will furnish guides to escort them in safeby bayond our 
boundaries. In this matter we will not fail to act in con- 
formity with the custom of the couatrp (Mulk Sirashta). 

ARUCLE 11. 

We will discharge any Si bandy, whether of horse or 
foot, Siudhis, Arabs, Makranis, or Pardesis who may at 
present be in our empljy, and will not hereafter entertain 
in our service any such descriptions of foreign mercenaries^ 
either of horse or foot, nor will we permit any one to do sow 
If from this time it is proved that we acu contrary to this 
stipulation, we hold ourselves responsible for doing so and 



TREATIES--KANJfiARi SETTLEMENT. Z&t 

liable to be fined, or to undergo any other punishment thfr 
Government may inflict. 

ARTICLE 12. 

In conformity with the wishes of the government of 
the Honourable Company, we will nob permit the open or 
concealed import or export of opium unaccompanied by a 
permit or seal (Chh&p). On this point we will adopt efficient 
arrangements within our limits, and should we discover any 
illicit opium, we will seize it and report the circumstances to 
the Government. We will, moreover, act upto any arrange- 
ments adopted in future by Government for regulating the 
trade in opium, 

ARTICLE 13. 

We will conduct ourselves in conformity to any orders 
we may receive from the Government, independent of the 
above Articles; and should Government require the presence 
of any one for the purpose of giving evidence in any 
matter of transaction under investigation, wa promise to 
produce the person so required. 

ARTICLE 14. 

Should a Mehta and peon be stationed in our village 
on the part of Government for the purpose of observing and 
reporting the due observance of the present agreement, we 
promise to make them acquainted with every occurrence, and 
to furnish them such accounts faithfully as it may be 
usual for Government to demand. 

ARTICLE 15, 

This engagement is binding on us and en our descendants 
from generation to g3neratioi, in" perpetuity, Wherefore on 
our decease should a son survive us, we stipulate that ha 
succeed to the management of our estate with the knowledge 
and sanction of Government. In case of our having no son 
and heir, arid wa wish to 'provide ourselves with one by 



818 BKWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

adoption y we promise to represent onr wished to Government 
and abide by its orders on the subjeet. 

In this manner we have eLtered into these fifteen 
Articles of Agreement a#d will conduct ourselves in conformity 
to the sama peaceably for ever and ever, or submit to any 
punishment Government may aw&rd for any infraction 
thereof. We pledge our Wattaa lands, Giras, and other 
property as security far their due observance. We also 
furnish as perpetual securities for our good behaviour and 
personal appearance, and that we will act in strict conformity 
to what is written above, the Barots Hamir Sing Devi 
Sing, and Mehtab Siug Kalida3, inhabitants of the village 
of Kanjhari of the Haloi Parganah, and as our 
perpetual securities Pagi Jit Sing Patubhai (proprietor) of 
Surnej, of the Wangdra parganab, Pagi Naranbhai Udesing 
(proprietor) of the village of Bakrolle, of the same 
parganah, and Baria Unadsing (proprietor) of the village of 
Sakurda, of the Baroda parganah; they will observe their 
part of this contract and oblige us to do so for ever and 
ever in perpetuity, for which their property is held 
responsible. 

(Sd.) Thakor Keskisino Abhesing, 
(what is written is genuine). 

For himself his son Deep Sing, brethern, 
dependents, and all under his authority. 

Declaration m*de by the Barots becoming securities. 

We declare that of our own free will and accord we 
become security for the good behaviour and personal bail for 
4he parties entering into the above engagement. 

(Sd.) Babot Hamirsing Devising, 
(Sd. Barot Mehtaesing Kalidas, 

of the Tillage of Kanjhari. 



TREATIES— KANJHARI SETTLEMENT. ^£9 

Declaration made by the persons becoming 
counter-secwrities. 

We, of our own free will, and in perfect possession of 
our senses, become counter security, in perpetuity, year by 
year and from generation to generation, to the Government 
lor the peaceful and proper observance of what is subscribed 
to above. We will abide by the same and cause it to be 
duly kept. If our principal doe3 not act in conformity with 
what he has subscribed to, and does not afford the satisfaction 
demanded by Government, we either collectively or individually 
-are responsible for him, and pledge our possessions and 
property as security for being so. 

The declaration is sincere and true. 

(Sd.) Pagi Jitsing Pathubhai, o£ Surnej. 
„ Pegi Naranbhai Udesirg, of BakrolIe % 
v, „ Baria Bawabhai Umedsiog, of Sakurda. 




350 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

PANDU MEWAS. 

Security bond oe sixteen articls taken by Lieutenant Colonel 

Ballantyne on behalf on the British Government from 

the Chiefs of the Mahi Kantha in the yEAR 1812. 

Agreement entered into by the Thakor of Bhadarwa, Um-etha, 
Angadh, Dodhi and Rayha along with the Chiefs of 
Mahihantha in 1812. 

We Thakor Kunwar... .. t . brothers, nephews 

and inhabitants of together with those bearing arms and 

dependent on the Ziila. 

According to the custom of the country we have 
received the orders of Government as subjects to^be obedient, 
and to live peaceably and orderly. We agreeing thus do of 
our own accord write the articles of Zamin, fa 'el Zamin^ 
Arr Zamin, Hazir Zamin and Mai Z*min as follows : — 

ARTICLE 1. 

We will not be guilty of any violence, theft, etc, nor 
will we instigate others to such acts in any part of the 
country. We will not associate with, nor instigate others to 
associate with outlaws, whether Kolis, Rajputs, Mu ; alman 
soldiery, Kathis, or other cflenders. We will not give them 
shelter nor food, nor huka, nor water ; i£ these come into 
our villages, we will seize them and give them up to 
Government ; if they should be passing through our boundaries^ 
we will pursue, seize, and deliver them up, and then act as 
Government shall order. We wilf not in any way assist 
disturbers. Should we be detected in having any thing to do 
with them, we will be answerable to Government. 

]£ the footsteps of thieves are traced into our boundaries, 
we will carry tliem forward, and deliver them over to the 
next village ; if the thief should belong to our village, we 
^vill hand him over to Government, and tha property stolen. 
Should we know thst the people of the next village are 



TREATIES — PANDU MEWAS SETTLEMENT. 351 

engaged in any unlawful acts, we will make it knowq ; if 
we do not, we will answer for it ourselves. If any of our 
people go into the Company's districts, or into any other 
talukas, to steal, we will be answerable ; if the thief should be 
killed in the act, we will not make any claim, nor raise any 
feud on that account. 

ARTICLE 2. 

The management of our taluka and land shall always 
be conducted in obedience to Government as hitherto. 

ARTICLE 3. 

We agree to the arrangement of Government regarding 
the dues of ghasdana, Jamabandi, khichri and other lawful 
demands : in that manner we will p*y them annually. The 
Government dues and certain dues to Zimin'ars are payable 
by us, and we have given banker's security tor their payment; 
in that manner we will pay without fail. 

ARTICLE 4. 

Should we have taken possession of any Zamindar's 
land or village through his weakness, we will give them up 
at the Government order on reasonable term^. Should we 
have obtained any one's hand or villages by a loan of money, 
we agree to its being redeemed in any reasonable way 
Government may decide on, and lay no claim on the land, 
nor will we dispute with the owner of the village about it. 
Should there be any dispute on mon9y transactions, either 
cow or hereafter, we will refer it to Government and abide 
by its decision, but will not quarrel direct) with the parties f 
nor accumulate any expanse on them, nor without the consent* 
of Government will we purchase or take in pledge or 
present any land, Giras or village. 

ARTICLE 5. 

We will not quarrel nor fight, nor instigate others ia 
cur taluka, with our relatives or among ourselves, If them 



332 OTWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

should bo any disturbanse of this kind, we will refer it to 
Government and abide by its decis'on ; we will not acb for 
ourselves in any thing. If any villages quarrel or collect a 
mob, we will have nothing to say to it. If there should be 
a Government Thana now or hereafter, as they shall tell us* 
so will we do. 

ARTICLE 6. 

Oar lawful dues, Giras, Wanta, Woledan, Rakhopa* 
whatever we have always enjoyed, and claim either in the 
Company's districts or in talukdar's or Zamindar's land, we 
will give a detailed account of such to Government ; and 
as Government shall provide for its payment, we and our 
children, to the latest posterity, shall abide by. Whatever 
Government will give, we will receive with gratitude. Should 
there be any boundary dispute, it shall be referred to 
Government ; what shall seem reasonable to Government to 
decide, we will agree to. 

ARTICLE 7. 

If any Girasia shall come to live in our taluka and 
shall not receive his Gir%s, Ranwatia, Fasaita, we will inform 
Government, but will not allow him to proceed to violence 
direct ; if we fail in this, and anything happens in consequence, 
we will be answerable, or we will hand over such Girasia to 
Government. We will [take care that no servant of ours 
while in our service, being discharged, shall, under pretence 
of claims on us, create any disturbance, be he Rajput, Koli, 
or other, or we will be answerable. 

ARTICLE 8. 

We will not impede any merchant or traveller going 
or coming; we will protect the roads. If any loss is 
incumd in our boundaries, we will expel and hand up the 
author to Government and be answerable. We will not levy 
more than ordinary transit dues on any persons. 



TOEATIBS~*AHDU MBWAS SEOTLBMCTT. 35£ 

ARTICLE 9. 

Should there be any Sibandy, horse and foot, in oar 
service, whether Sindhis, Arabs, Makranis or oth9r foreigner^ 
we will discharge them; and we will not maintain foreigners 
in future, nor allow others to do so. If we shall be proved 
to do so hereafter, we will be answerable, and we agree to 
aDy punishment Government may inflict. 

ARTICLE 10. 

Should we have given to any one from our paternal 
estate or shares of our brotherhood . any Giras, Wauta, 
Pasaita, in payment of loan or compensation of blood or 
inam, we will not resume without repayment, or compensatioa. 

Any Giras or land given for the maintenance of our 
brothers or relatives which they have always enjoyed shall 
not be resumed ; if in these things there should be any 
dispute, it shall be referred to Government and any 
reasonable order obeyed. 

ARTICLE 11. 

If any one in the Company's service, or any troops, 
be coming or going, we will guard and watch them while 
in our boundaries, and, according to the custom of the 
couatry, will give them guides and guards to e3cort them 
beyond our boundaries. 

ARTICLE 12. 

If the Kclis of our boundaries have any horses, it shall 
be made known to Government, and as orders shall be 
received, they shall keep them or not. If we offend Govern* 
ment, and Government take our horses from us, we can lay 
no claim on that score. > 

ARTICLE 13. 

We will not allow auy one to smuggld opium without 
a parwana from Government sealed. Should it be attempted, 
45 



354 *' RBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

we will seize it and report it to Government, and as 
Government shall order, so will we do. 

ARTICLE 14. 

If any Mehta or sepoy shall come to superintend at 
our villages, we will show all our papers and accounts and 
will not refuse. 

ARTICLE 15. 

For any past robberies, if any footsteps have been 
brought to our village, or the thief is proved to be in 
our village, or the stolen goods are proved to be in our 
village, we will restore the whole and be answerable to 
Government, 

ARTICLE 16. 

Besides the above articles we will obey any orders of 
Government. If for any money matters, or any business, or 
to give evidence, any person is required, we will produce 
him 

In this manner we have written sixteen articles, and 
we and our posterity will abide by them ; if we fail herein, 
we will abide by such punishm nt as Government may 
itflict. For adherence to these articles our country and 
lands, giras and revenue, are our securities for our good 
conduct. Barot + + + of the pargana + + is fa'el 
Zamin, Hazir Zamin and Mai Zamin and Thakors + + + of 
4- + + are our counter securities, together with their villages* 
As above written, every year and for ever these shall be 
answerab e and make us so. 



HARTXKOT SETTLEMENT. 355- 

NARUKOT ( JAMBUGHODA) SETTLEMENT. 



Translation of a petition from Jagta Baria, Chief of Narukot, 
to the address of Mr. Malet, 1st Assistant Political 
(Jovfimissioner y Gujarat, in charge JRezvahantha. 

I petition that my Jamabandi to the Gaekwar Sirkar 
is Rs. 41, which I pay; and if at any time I am required 
by the Sirkar, I attend. Mr. Wilbughby's Svvari came t& 
Sankhed8, at which time the arrangements for all the 
Mewases were made, and I was called, and my settlement} 
also was made and my tribute was settled at Ha. 41, and a 
Thana for the repression of the Naikdas was placed in my 
country for some years. At this time the Naikdas were 
well settled. After this the Thana left, and the Naiks 
again became troublesome, and my villages were deserted: 
therefore my wife went to the Manager at Sankheda, and 
petitioned that " The Saheb took tribute from me, and 
protected me properly, but now that you take the money, 
you must protect me : I will attend you, and you must 
settle the Naikdas." He did not make any settlement but 
imprisoned my wife. Therefore I went to San iheda, and 
petitioned that " you are my lord ; why do you imprison 
my wife? This trioute has fallen on ms; where can I 
represent it ? " Not attending to my petition, he imprisoned 
me, and I remained in ccnBnament a month and a half; 
after which the Mamlatdar be^an to say, " Write over to 
my Sirkar half of your Parg*na ; and you shall ba released/' 
Being helpless, I wrote over the share, and was released. 
After that, the Gaekwar sent a Thana, and begin to cQllecfc 
half the revenue. All villages had baen deserted, and Rs. 
500 of produce only remained ; I h ^d no means of procuring 
food ; therefore do you, as my lord, protect me, and majse 
arrangements similar to those formerly effected by Mr. 
Willoughby, when I shall be alls to exist. The Naikdas 



*366 RBWA KANTHA DIBECTOBY. 

iiave become powerful; I am weak; I cannot afford to keep 
two sepoys for the protection of my house ; therefore do 
you befriend me. The Gnikwar has placed a Th*ria, but 
there has not not been the least settlement with the Naikdas. 
Since the Thana has baen here, my house has been plundered. 
I have many times gone to the Thana, and petitioned the 
Mamlatdar, but be does not attend to me ; therefore, when 
Mr. Stockley and his Karbhari, MoU Bhai, came to Baria, 
I repaired thitber, and petitioned that fi Formerly the 
Saheb protected me ; now the Gaekwar has oppressivtly 
imprisoned me and has taken a share, and placed a Thana 
in my Zilla, and ha3 not made any arrangements with the 
Naikdas." At that time the Saheb gave me a Parwana to 
Jadow Rao, to wgrn the Mamlatdar to remove the Narukot 
Thana ; and to make a settlement with the Naikdas. Jadow 
Rao warned the Mamlatdar to do so. He, attributing this 
as a fault to me, after two months imprisoned me, with my 
urife, and my Sepoy Duria, for eight months, and took a 
fine of R&. I,u00, and ordered me not to complain to the 
Sahe u . He fl gged my sepoy, and fined him. Thus I have 
teen oppressed. My wife, being greatly injured by the 
confinement), returned home and died. The Naiks burnt 
my house, and some of my cattle, and took away many, so 
that I am injured in every way. Now your sowar came to 
call me, but the Gaekwar Sirkar's Meht* would not grant 
me permission. Beiug stopped four or five days, I sent my 
younger brother to the H&zur. At last by contrivance I have 
come to you. I am in want ot food ; therefore protect me. 

Received the 16th March 1838, at Simalia. 



^translation of a Letter from the First Assistant, Political 
Commissioner to Nana GanesW Kumavisdar of Sarikheda, 
dated t4th May 1838. 

The Baria of Narukot has petitioned that the Thanadar 
-of Sankheda has greatly oppressed him, and has imprisoned 



NARUKOT SETTLEMENT. $57 

his wife, and has taken a writing from him for a share of 
his revenue, and agreed with him to make arrangement with 
the Naikdas, but has not made any, but has received the 
share of revenue annually, and once imprisoned him, and 
taken a note for a fine. Thus he has petitioned, and a 
copy is sent to you: therefore do you send a detailed reply, 
and remove the stwar which has been placed on the Baria's 
security. It is necessary to inquire into this affair; therefore 
whatever writing you have taken from Jagta Baria, quickly 
send a copy to me. 



Translation &f a latter from Nana Ganesk to the address of 
the First Assistant Political Commissioner, dated 1st Jwat 
1838, Jambughoda. 

I send to you Baria Jugta's security bond, and the 
note on the marriage of his son. 

To the Gaekwar Sirkar, &c. This writing of rae, 
Jagat Amra, for brothers and nephews, &3. fjr my subjects, 
villages and Taluka, with all inhabitants from generations : 
perpetual security to the Gaekwar Government for Fyl 
Fitur, Sankheda Birot Karshan, Dijee Barot, Bahadur 
Waju, are given for good or bad, that I will not myself 
commit any crime or rebellion, nor cause it to ba committed 
by any other, and that I will not rob nor cause others to 
rob, nor plunder on the high road nor cause others to do 
so, nor will attack villages in gangs, nor steal cattle nor 
cause them to be stolen, nor protect criminals nor harbour 
them, and if any one living in our country should co nmib 
Jhinsa in the Sirkar's Mahals, I will produce him ; if the 
Sirkar's Sowari come into my districts, I will not behave 
improperly, nor, without the orders of the Sirkar will I 
keep Sibandis ; whenever the Sirkar orders, D will come and 
perform service, and will not injure the Sirkar's country, 
nor will I cause any annoyance to tha Sirkar's Thana; and 
the moiety which I have written over to the Sirkar* 



$58 RBW A KANTHA DIRECTOBY. 

according to it let the Sirkar collect. If I make anjr 
difference, my securities will be answerable, and will produce 
me before the Sirkar ; and if not, they will answer for my 
faults. Besides these, the following are my Arr Zamin: — 

Dama Pradhan, Naik of Muthree. 

Mehta Roopa, Patel of Beehrajee, Pargana Sankheda* 

Naik Umed Govind of Jhank&poora ditto ditto. 
These three persons will be answerable for everything; and 
if the Sirkar sends Mohsals, they will pay the amount. 
These Arr Zamin will answer whatever the Sirkar or its 
officer may ask. Asbad Sud 2nd, Samvat 1889. 

(Signed) Baria Jagatsing Umarsing. 

(What is written above is trne.) 
Securities Signatures. 

Barot Karshan Daji [ what is 
written above is true ). 

Barot Bahadur Waju (What is 
written above is true.) 

Patel Mehta Bupa, Arr Zamin. 

Naik Umed Govind. 

Naik Dama Pratbasti. 
Witnesses. 

Desai Bhugwan Mehta, 
Desai Haribhai Uderam, 
(Signed in presence.) 
( Desai Nathubhai Ambaidas, 

by the hand of Desai Haribhai. 



NARUKOT SETTLEMENT. 35* 

Translation of a note of Jogta Baria, dated Ashvoin End 2n&\ 

Samvat 1893. 

I have received Rs. 490 -1.0 at the monthly interest of 
Rs. 1 per ceat. This sum I have received in ready cash for 
the marriage o£ my son, and when my lord requires, I will 
pay it: — Thus, I will pay it: — 

Posh Shud 2nd Rs 151-0-0 

Maha Wad 2nd fl 151-0 

Chaitra Shud 2nd „ 158-1-8 

Thu3 I will pay the money ; and besides this, I will 
pay separately whatever interest there triiy be ; and my 
securities for this sum are Patel Nathu Partab, Moje 
Wurali; Patel Kuber Sundar, Moje Alladpur ; Patel Grokal 
Kastur, Moje Khandil. If I do not pay it, they will. 

Agreed, — Baria Jagatsing Umarsing. 

(What is written above is true.) 

Baria Wakhat. 

Patel Kuber Sundar. 

Patel Gokal Kastur. 

Waman Bhut Anandran* 
(In the presence.) 

Patel Jagjivan Tulsidas. 
(In the presence.) 



Translation of a Yad from His Rignness the Gaekwar to 
the Political Commissioner, dated Baroda, 28th Sutur Sun 
J 254 Hijri; received 1st June 1838. 

Your Yad of the 9bh Cbaitra Wad 1838, No. 215, 
haa been received. Its contents are that the gentleman ia 
the Rewa Kantha has wribten that JagH Barifi/ of Narukofc 
paid Jainabandi to him, but now that the Sankheda 
Knmavisdar takes it, as the arrangements with the rest of 
the Mewasis were made, ao will Jagta &*rU p*y< This ia 



W : .' ion ■ 

360 MWA KAKTHA DIBBCTOBY. 

written for my information. My reply is:— 'the Narukofc 
Baria Jagta in the year 1889 petitioned the Kumavisdar of 
Sankheda to plaoe a Thana and make arrangament3 for him x 
and persuaded him of his poverty. On this the Kumavisdar, 
raising a new Sibandi, made the arrangements far Narukot ; 
therefore there has been an expense of Rs. 8 824 for Sibandi 
from this Sirkar, and a Thana has been placed in ; $hanpura 
for the protection of Narukob. After t|is the Narukob 

Baria of his own accord agreed to pay to the Sirlra* half 
of the produce of his estate, and gave a writing to that 
effect. According to this, for the year 1889,, the accounts 
of the Rewa Kantha, which cume from the Company Sirkar, 
state that the NUrukot tribute is collected bv the Gaekwar 
Officers. Now the Saheb w/ites that the Narukob tribute 
will be kept in the Mulakgiri accounts. Formerly the 
Narukot Baria paid Rs. 41 ; when the Sirkar arranged hi* 

country, he agreed to pay half his revenue by a writing of 
agreement. The copy of that agreement is sent with this 
Yad; from which you will become acquainted with the 
business. For five years, the half share has been received 
by the Sirkar. Let the arrangement b3 continued, that in 
future this Sirkar's Jamabundi may nob diminish. The 
management of Narukot has remained with that of my districts, 
which does nob cause any annoyance to the Rewi Kanbha 
Mulakgiri. Therefore, takihg all this into consideration let 
theiproduce of 1894 be paid to the Kumavisdar of Sankheda, 
according to the written agreement, and according to ib let 
it remain with him, and give orders to the Baria aforesaid 
to this purport ; do you therefore write an order to this 
effect to the Rewa Kanbha Saheb. A Yad, dated Vaishak 
Wad 5th, of th? same year, No. 292, has been received by 
the Sirkar, in which ib is written — Let the Bhanpura Thana 
be removed, as long as that Thana remains, no settlement 
can be made with the Naikras; nor will the people return 
to the country/ On 'this Business,* also/ another Yad of the 



«IStJK0* 8ETTLfittBHT. 361 

9th Vaishakh Wad, No. 301, arid a third Yad, Vaishak Wal 
3rd, No. 324, have been received. The Thana at Bbanpura 
is stationed for the protection of Narukot ; the reason is 
above detailed, from which you will understand that on 
account of the Thana at Bhanpura there is no annoyance 
from the Naikras. 



Translation of a Note for the half share of 
the Revenue. 

To Shrimant R*ja Shri Sayaji Rao Gaekwar Sena Khas 

Khel Sbamsher Bahadur, District Pargana Sankheda. 

Jagatsing Atnarsing Baria, of Tokalpur, as formerly named, 

cow Narukot, and Bechar Atnarsing, and Nara Amarsing, 

and son Anandsing Jagatsing and the rest of the brotherhood, 

&c. I, of my own accord, and in the full possession of my 

faculties, and my brothers and the whole of mr family and 

relations, and Patels of my Pargana, with one accord, having 

come to the Sirkar in the presence at Sankheda, and with 

clear heart write to the Sirkar. Let the Sirkar, befriending 

me, place a Thana in my Pargana, and make arrangements 

for my Pargana. There a r e four villages in my Pargana, 

and the Naikras have ruined my estate, and the Udepur 

Wala R&ja molests me ; therefore my country does not 

flourish; and I have not for the last four months remained 

in one place to eat bread ; my children weep for food: thus 

the time has come upon me. Therefore the whole of our 

family with one acoord write to the Sirkar, that we all 

before wrote to the Sirkar, on which the Sirkar place i a 

Thana, and protected us greatly. We are poor people, when 

can we obtain money to pay Sibandi ? Therefore wa all, 

having consultei, have written over to the Sirkar the half 

share of the Jamabandi, customs and all revenue. With one 

heart We have all uaited and written it As the Sirkar 

has hitherto protected us, thus let it henceforward protect} 

46 



368 BBWA E4NTHA DIBKCTORY. 

us by this, which I have written in the public Kachert* 
This halfshare which I have made over, is made over for 
as long as the moon and sua endure. Whit I hwe written 
is true. I swear by my father. Dited 1889 Waishak Sud. 

(Sd.) Baria Jagatsing Amarsing. 

Baria Bechar Amarsing. 

Baria Uana Amarsing. 

Baria Anandsing Jagatsing. 

Signed by all the brothers, nephews, &c 

Baria Uka Dama. 

(What is written above is true) 

Baria Harkha Vira. 
Witnesses, 
Baria Mowjae Nagar. 

Patel Daanka Gadna Clioolaf, of Jotwarkur. 
Pat9l Churwu, of Jotwar. 
Patel Rupa Nutwa, of Dharampnree. 
Naik Umed Govind, of Amrapur. 
Patel Jeta Narayen, of Maloo. 

True translation. 

(Sd.) A MALET. 
First Assistant Politick Comnissioner. 



Extract from Letter No. 2096 <*f 31st October 1838 from the 
Secretary to Government, Political Depxrtmmt, to the 
Political Commissioner for Gujarat. 

* * # 

8. No doulit can exist of the right of the British 
Government to insist that the Giekw*r sh*ll abstain froia 
all interference with the Naikda* of NArukob, aqd that the 
Th*na established by him at Baanpura stall be withdraw 



NARUKOT SBTTLEMEOT. 36$ 

His Highness possessed no right to establish this post/ in 
direct violation of the arrangement effected by Mr. Willoughby, 
while in charge of Panch Mahals in 1826. The measure 
ought to have been resisted in -the first instance, and the 
Governor in Council therefore directs that th3 Gaekwar be 
called upon to withdraw the Thana in question within the 
period of one month, aftsr which measures should be adopted 
to remove it without further reference to Governm9nt. 

9. The cession by Jagta Baria to the Gaekwar, of 
half of the Pargana of Narukot c*n hardly be respected. 
Hie Highness has failed to perform the conditions under which 
it was made; added to which, as Narukot came under the 
control of the British Government in 1826 ( although the 
same has been very imperfectly exercised), the sanction of 
Government was required to render such cession valid. It 
further appears that the cession was not voluntary, but was 
extorted from the Chief at a time when himself and his 
wife were under restraint. Under these circumstances, His 
Highness can have no claim to be indemnified for his alleged 
expenses, for during the last five years he has received half . 
the revenues of the Pargana. 

10. In the concluding part of the 16th paragraph, 
Mr. Male t states that Jagta Baria is willing to transfer 
the cession in question to the British Governimnt, aid 
recommends that this offer should be accepted. Were this 
measure to ba sanctioned, the motives of Government, in 
calling on the Gaekwar to -u linquish it> would certainly ba 
liable to miaihtepretation; and the Governor in . Ccunoil . 
considers that it would be a preferable plan* to- receive -&4 
moderate tribute -Annually from ■, the Chief, >io< indemnify* 
Government for its expenses, the revenues^ of the propuosqidj 
cession bebg held in mortgage for the same. ' On this point, 
however, you are requested to call upon Mr. Malet to favour 
Government with his opinion. 



364 BBWA SAHTfiA DIBBCTORT. 

-Extract from the letter of 16th November 1838 from Jtfk 
Malety 1st Assistant Commissioner for Gujerat in charge 
Bewa Kantha, to Political Commissioner and Resident^ 
Barodx. 



8. That my proposal of agreeing to Jagta Baria'a 

cession to us [of a moiety of his revenues might not be 

considered to originate in a grasping spirit, I proposed, at 

the end of my 16th paragraph, that such portion of the 

Government share as might not be required do p*y for the 

superintendence of his estate, and for any outlay advisable 

for its improvement, should be paid over to the Baria j but 

as our motives migat be misconstrued, the modification 

ordered by Government is preferable; but in no case should 

more than the moiety be retained. It will be necessary for 

many years to maintain a karkua at Jambughoda; and 

the management of the estate for its own goo J, and indeed 

for the peace of the country, must for soon time remain 

with us. i think that this method is preferable to raising a 

certain tribute, for if my expectations are realized, the estate 

will rapidly become valuable, and the transit of merchandise 

by Jambughoda instead of by Sankheda and Dabhoi, may 

require some species of police, which would cause a fluctuating 

expense. Other reasons for money disbursements might 

also arise, so that I consider a fixed tribute unadvisable; 

vthile the knowledge that from a state of actual beggary he 

has become the head oc a rapidly improving estate, half the 

revenues of which w 11 afford him a fully sufficient income, 

will bind the Chief to us by ties of interest, which *loa* 

-can be considered binding. 



NABUEGT 8ETTLBMEKT. 30& 

Extract from the letter dated 10th January 1839 from the 

Secretary to Gonernment, Political Department, Bombay t to 
the Political Commissioner for Gujarat. 

* # * 

4. The Governor in Council is farther pleased to 
approve o£ the arrangement} proposed in paragraph' 8, relative 
to the cession to the British Government by Jagta Baria 
of half of the revenues of the district of Narukot, and you 
are requested to instruct Mr. Malet to submit to Government 
an annual statement, showing the receipts and disbursements 
on account of the district in question. 




366 BEWA KANTHA DIBECTORY. 

..,.,.. TRIBUTE (1820). 

Translation of a Treaty beiiceen the British and Gaektcar 
Governments dated 3rd April 1820. 



Gaekwar 
seal. 



With the view of promoting the prosperity, peace and 
safety of the country, and in order that the Gaikwar 
Government shall receive without trouble and with facility 
the amount of tribute due to it from the provinces of 
Kathiawar and Mahikantha > it has been arranged with the 
British Government that His Highness Sayaji Rao Giikwar, 
Sena Khas Khel Shamsher Bahadur, shall not send his 
troops into the districts belonging to the Zamindars of both 
the above provinces without the consent of the Company's 
Government, and shall not refer any claims against the 
Zamindars or others residing in those provinces except 
through the arbitration of the Company's Government: ( on 
the other hand) the Company's Government engage that 
the tribute, including Kharajat, as fixed by the settlements 
of 1864 a. D. 1807 and 1008; and of Samvat 1868, A. ix 
1811 and 1812, shall be paid by the Zamindars to the 
Gaekwar's Government free cf expense, If in consequence 
of the misconduct of any Zamindar or TaUikdar it becomes 
necessary to incur any considerable expense, the same, 
without any addition thereto, shall be defrayed by the said 
Zamindar. \ 



RAILWAY AGREEMENTS. 

B. B. & C. I, Railway-ANAND to RATLAM section ( BARIA.) 
No. 100, dated Devgad Baria, the 17th July 1891. 
From t 

Maharawal Shri Mansingjee, Raja of Baria. 
To, 

H. T. Ommaney Esqr. 

Political Agent, Rewakantha, 

With reference to your latter No. 986, dated the 6fch 
instant, I have the honour to inform you that, in order to 
meet the wishes of Government, I heraby grant on bahalf 
of myself and my successors, to the British Government, the 
right to occupy and administer, and to exercise full civil and 
criminal jurisdiction over the lands of my state, occupied and 
traversed or hereafter to be occupied or traversed by the 
Godhra Rutlam Railway, including lands required for Railway 
purposes. 

It is to be understood that the authorities exercising 
the jurisdiction granted as aforesaid will liberally afford to 
the servants of my state all reasonable & practicable facilities, 
in view to the prevention of crimes, the apprehension of 
criminals, the seizure of stolen propsrty, and in view generally 
to the maintenance & promotion of peaca and order. 



ANivLESHWAR— NANDOD Railway. 

I, F. W. Snell, Lieut. Colonel, I. S. 0., Administrator 
of the Rajpipla State, do hereby agree on behalf of the 
Rajpipla Stale, as follows:— 

(a) That I am prepared to assign and cede to the 
British Government the lands th&t may be required 
for the purposes of the branch line of Railway from 
Ankleshwar to Nandod, including stations and 
outhouses, and any additional lands that* may hereafter* 



358 MWA KANTHA DIRBOTOBY. 

be required bonafide for such purposes, to be occupied' 
and administered by that Government for the term 
of their occupation for the purposes of the Railway, 
together with full civil and criminal jurisdiction 
thereon. 

{b) That I am prepared to bear and pay all Police 
charges which may be incurred during construction 
in respect of the portion of the aforesaid branch of 
the Railway that runs through the limits of the 
Rajpipla territory, and after the said line of Railway 
is declared open for traffic, the Rajpipla State will 
bear and pay 3/10ths of the Polioa charges, including 
the charges for watch and ward as well as for those 
of law and order in proportion to the length of the 
line passing through the Rajpipla State, the remain* 
ing 7/10th of the said Police charges for the entire 
branch line of Railway from Ankleshwar to Nandod 
being borne as working expenses by the Railway 
administration. 

Sd./ P. W. Snbll, Lieut.-Col ? 

Nandod, 1 Administrator, 



j 



27th March 1896.) Rajpipla State. 

GODHRA^I^JNAVADA Railway. 

I, Maharana Shri Sir Wakhatsingji, Rajaji of Lunavada, 
hereby cede to the British Government full and exclusive 
power and jurisdiction of every kind over the lands in the 
said state, which are, or may hereafter be, occupied by the 
Godhra-Lunavada Railway and any extensions thereof, 
(including all lands occupied for stations, for out-buildings and 
for other railway purposes), and over all persons and things 
whatsoever within the said lands. 

Sd./ WAKHATSINHJI, 

2nd October 1912. Rajaji of Lunavada. 



Section IY B 

GOVERNMENT 

HOLES AND REGULATIONS 

WITH 

EXPLANATORY MEMORANDUM 

ON 

PROCEDURE ETC. 



OOVEBKBIENT RULES AND BEGXJLA.TIONS. 



371 



SECTION ff. 

Government Ifnles aqd Regulations litb 

Explanatory Hen}orandum on 

Procedure k. 



Memorandum on the Classification and Jurisdiction 
of States and Agency Courts. 

There are three descriptions of States and Talukas 
in the Rewa Kantha Agarcy; viz (1) those which exercise 
plenary jurisdiction, (2) those which exercise limited jurisdiction! 
and (3) those whfch do not exercise any jurisdiction. 

The follcwirg list shows the Jurisdictional States and 
the jurisdiction exucised by each. 



Names of States 
and their Class. 



Jurisdiction. 



Civil. 



Criminal. 



1 Rajpipla (1) ... 

2 Chhota Udepur. (II). 

3 Bariya. (II) ... 

4 Lunawada* (II) 

5 Ealasinor. (II) 
6^nntb. (II 



Unlimited. 



Unlimited, except that 
Rajpipla may not try 
British subjects for 
capital offences with- 
out permission of the 
Political Agent; and 
the otfcterr may "not 
with o it such pennisj 
sion try any but Jheir 
own respective subject* 
for such offences. -'• - 
...■■■ t 



372 



MEW A KANTHA P1RECTCRT. 





Jurisdiction. 




Name* of States 








and thtir Cla*a. 


Civil. 


CriminuL 


7 Kadana (UI) 


Upto Rs. 20,000. 


7 years' rigorom 
imprisonment and 
fine Us. 20,000. 


8 Bhadarwa. (IV) ... 


Rs. 10,0C0 
I nlimited (pergonal) 


3 Do. Do. 5>00Ql 


9 Sanjeli (V; 


5,000 Do. 


2 years' rigorous 
ira|iri8onmeut-2,000L 


10 Umetha (V) ##t 


5,000. 


2 Do 


Do. 


11 Jambu^boda (V) ••• 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


12 Mandwa (V) 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1j Vajiria (V) 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


14 Gad Boriad (VI) ... 


500 


*3 mcnths rigorovs 
imprisonment-20Q» 


15 Agar (VI) ... 


500 


• Do. 


Do. 


16 JIaswadi (VI) 


It 


• 

. tt 


tt 


17 Sihora (VI) 


It 


t# 


»• 


18 Cbfaaliar (VI) 


at 


tt 


t> 


19 Shanor (VI) 


tt 


tt 


tt 


20 Uchhad (VI) 


tt 


?t 


tt 



• The Chief a o! Gad Boriad, Agar and Naswadi have been granted 2nd 
<JU** Hjk{ist rial po* rs as * personal distinction. 

* In the town ot Chanad, which is held jointly with the Barodfat 
State, t u* R*aa of Min Iwi exerjues unlimited civil jurisdiction, eaoepd 
ibat elaims relating to monetary transactions are tried by the Uaroda State. 



GOYFRNMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS. Zl% 

The ncn juris Jicion*l state* ar<* 43 in number. 

Residua* y Jurisdiction. 

2. The par m » rr power exercises jurisdiction it* 
IbtM States as sp^oifwd bel< w : — 

(a) In j \\\* Jiction*! States resiiaary j KH iietrro, 
u e. t» at vhich is not vested i 1 tha siiJ States 
respectively; 

Notr: — In the Ft%tes whi ?h exercise plenary 
juried iction (na nely 1st an 1 2nd class J, tha 
Agency has m rely genera! snoer vision. Tivsa 
Stat?* however cannot try Eiropsan British 
bu jects for cipiul ofieuces. The Sesmd CUss 
Statt-8 Cin not try any but their own subjects 
for such offences. The jurisdiction in such 
cases devolves on the Agency. In the StataS 
uhici h*ve li nited jurisdiction all the remaining 
jurisdiction rests witu the Agency. 

4&) In nrn jurisdictional States and Talukas, entire 
jurisdiction, civil and eriaiinil. 

NoTi.-Thi8 is exercised through the Political 
Ag n\ Assistant Political Ag< nt, Deputy 
Political Agent and Thanaars. There are two 
1 liana Circles, comprizing sooae jurisdictional 
ani lun jurisdictional falukas T> each Than* 
Circle thtro is appointed a "ThanaUr, " who 
is tin officer invested with the lowest jari&lictbn 
(civl and criminal). Tae two TUan* Circles 
ire:— 

1. Sankbeda Mewa*. * 

2. Pandu M^w*8. 

(c) T^mp»r«ry jirisdiotion in States under Qji&ot 
mmi management. 



374 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Note.— -The Administrators or Managers are given 
partial jurisdiction and the remaining jurisdiction 
is exercised by the Agency so long as the State 
is under manfg> ment. 

3. The ft llcwirg is a synopsis of important Govern* 
ment orders en the exercise of Agency Jurisdiction and 
procedure in Bewa Kantha. 

European British Subjects. 

4. Criminal Jurisdiction in respect cf European British 
Subjects. 

(a) The High Court cf Brmbay is empowered to 
exercise original aid appellate criminal jurisdic- 
tion over European Bntish -Subjects of His 
Majesty, residing in the States in the Rcwa 
Kantha Afercy. (Government; of India Notifi- 
cation No. 953 I. B. of 16th April 1913). 

(fe) The Political Agenf, Bcwa Kantha. is appointed 
a Justice cf the Pe*ce, wit'in the li aai s of his 
charge (Government Notification No 4£7l. I of 
18th December 1888)* and as such is diiect^d tz 
commit European British sulj ct3, being 
Christians, for trial t^ the High Court of 
Bciubay {Government Notification No 2616 J, 
cf 6th August 18^0 and GovVromeit Norification 
]So. 319 D. of 13th Ftbruaiy 1917). 

Administrator General's AcU 

% 

No. 855 dated Simla, the Kith April 1913. 

5. For the purpose of the Administrate r General's 
Act, the States in the Rewa Kantha are included in the 
Presidency of Eombay (Government Notification No. 101 J. 
cf 18th July 1878) and the Political Ageut is invested 
wth the powers of District Judge. (Govetnmant NotificAlioa 
No. 3542 L of 27th August 1891). 



GOVERNMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 37$ 

Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages,, 

6. The Political Agnb is appointed Registrar of 
Births and Deaths under Sicfcion 13 Art VI of 1836, for 
the States within the Agaicy in respect of ths cU*333 of 
persons indicated in Section II, subsection (1), clause (6)^ 
c£ that Act. 

For the purposes of Section 24, subsection (2), ofthfr 
Act, the tf, gistrar General of B>noay is appunfced R)gtstrar 
Genera! for the said Stats* (Government Notification No. 
4227 of 3 1st October 1889;. 

The fees leviable are prescribed* by Government ir* 
Notification No. 1586 E. of 19th August 1832. 

Civil Jurisdiction. 

7. (a) The Civil Courts of Government for the exercisei 
of the jurisdiction vesting in it in the Raw i Kantha Agency 
are as follows : — 

(I) Subordinate Courts, viz. tho ThandarsV and 

Managers Courts ; 

(II) The Assistant Political Agent's and Deputy 
Political Agent's Courts. 

(III) The Political Agents Court; > 

(IV) The Court of Jfche Governor in Council. 

(b) Toe revised rules defining the jafisdkrtion &c. <rf 
these sweral Coarts and regulating the rtgh!) of appeal, 
payment of coqrt fees, ani the discharge o£ judicial business 
were promulgated in Government Resolution No. 3817 of 
lbt Jul} 1915. 

(c) The following Cmrts have beau declared to be* 
coarts established or continued by the Governor General ion 
CouiiciJ, vz:~ :*,,.. 

f lhe Court of the Political Agsnt % 

Do. AesisUnt Political Ag^nt. ' ' 



876 KEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Do. Dtputy Polit'cal Agent, 

Do. Sptikket'a Thanadar. 

Do. Pandu Thanadar. 

(d) Degrees of B i*ish ?nd*an Courts may be sent 
to anv cf the fiiet tlreeof tie *h>v* Court? under the Civil- 
Procedure Cede for execution and Vice Versa. 

(c) Th* ah va Cmrts aerva. free of coat, processes 
issued by Civl Courts in the B»mt-a/ Piesidensy. 

8. Se*viee of Processes and Execution of Decrees. 

Noti6c*tions cf tie Government of India are published 
from tm- to time fur reg dating the reciprxjtl service of 
processes and execution of decrees of B iti<?h laiii and 
Agency Courts and those of Nati?e St tss under the Agency 
*s required by the Civil Procedure Code. 

Criminal Jurisdiction. 

9. (a) Criminal Courts established by Government in 
the Rewa Kantha Agency are; — 

(1) The Court of the R litiosl Agent, exeroisi g 
the powers cf a Sessions JuJgi, %nd also of a 
District Magistrate. 

(2) The Court of the Assistant Pjlitical Agent, 
(1st Class Magistrate.) 

(3) The Court of the Deputy Political Agent ( 1st 
Class Magistrate). 

(4) Courts of the 1 hanadars (2nd class Magistrates.) 

(5) The Court of the Head Karkuo Dodka ( 3rd 
Class Magistrate. 

(b) The Governor in Council has d* legated to the 
Go&tn s»i< ner, N. D, powers to dispose of all appeals fr >m 
the deo'sions cf the Political Age tit and all applications 
for revistou in oriminnl cases otbfr than murder otses. With 
t€g»td to applbftfet tob for revision, Govt r amen b has reserved 
* right to rtverse or nudity the # CoaiiuUdioa$r'd orders it it 



GOVERNMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 37T 

should appear necessary ( Go vernm ant Resolutions N03. 5852 
of 16fch Daceinber 1878, para 4, and 770 of 18th February 
1880 ). 

Authority of the Commissioner, N. D. 

10. (a) The Commissioner, Northern Division, is 
charged with the supervision of the administrative proceedings 
of the Political Agent, but so a3 to interfere as little as 
possible with the influence of the Polit'cal Agent, as the 
representative of Government, in diplomatic ccutitora. ( Gov- 
ernment Resolutions Nos. 3376 of 28 bh November 1877 
paras 7 and 9, and 5852 of 16th December ,1878, paras 2 
and 3). 

(b) The Commissioner's jurisdiction in criminal matters 
has been 3tated above; in civil judicial business he has no 
part. (Government Resolution No. 5852 of 16bh December 

1878, para 4). 

(c) Correspondence relating to civil judicial matters 
is addressed by the Political Agent to Government direct; 
correspondence on all other subjects except in case3 of 
emergency is submitted to Government through the Com- 
missioner (Government Resolution No, 3483 of 5th July 
1854). 

Appeals. 

11. The Appellate Courts are the Courts of Deputy 
Political Agent or Assistant Political Agent, Political Agent, 
Commissioner N. D. and Government in regular succassion. 

Appeals from the decisions or orders of tha Governor 
in Council to th9 Government oE India or t>)the Secretary 
of State in Council are governed, respectively, by the rules 
regulating the submission (i)'of patitions to the G >v3rnmefrfc 
of India and (ii) of memorials to the Secretary of Ss&ta for 
India. 
48 



378 BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY* 

Police. 

12. The Police Superintendent, Panch Mahals, is ex> 
officio Saperintendeat of the Agmcy Polio:?, Rrw* Kan&ha, 
and controls fie force employed in th3 Thana Cycles. This 
forcn has taken tha place of the G lekwar's contingent, which 
wa3 disbanded in 1885, aud is paid from a subsidy contributed 
by laroia oat of the tribute. 

Laws, 
13, The laws in force are :— 

1. Tha Civil Procedure Code. 

2. The Indian P<mal Code. 

3. The Criminal Proceluro Code. 

4 The District Poliea Acts (act 17 of 1890). 

5. The Revenue Recovery Act of 1890, 

6. The O^ium Act. 

7. The Abkari Act. 

8. The Epidemic Diseases Act. 

9. Daccan Agricultural Relief Act. 

Special. Regulations. 

1. Alienation Rules. 

2. Arms Rules. 

3. Border Court Rules. 

4. Boundary Settlement Rules. 

5. Civil Court Riles. 

6 Encumbared Estates Rules. 

7. Limitation and Court fee Rules. 

8 Registration Rules. 

9. Waltar Rules. 

10. Wanta Rules. 

Border Court Rules were fratnid in 187T for ff v t$ 

-disposal of cases of .birder riids by wild triba3 oa thai 

frontiers of Kajpufcana aid Ceatril India States ami ara 
still in force. 



GOVERNMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 37 fr 

Waltar Eules are rules regarding compensation for 
injury done by outlaws or highway robbers. The Kathiawar 
Waltar Rules, with the modifications approved for the Mahi 
Kantha, are to be taken by the Political Agent, Kewa 
Kantha, for his guidance in the settlement of chims to 
compensation of the above nature ( Government Resolution 
No. 2343 of 26th May 1881). But these are very rarely 
enforced. 

The Wanta Rules are rules defining the powers of 
petty Talukdars who own Wanta lands in Baroda territory 
for the management of their Wanta estates or rights r 

In all other matter?, the spirit of the British laws is 
followed, so far as they are suitable. 

Extradition. 

14. (a) Extradition icith British India. No special law or 
treaty provides a special procedure for the extradition of 
offenders between British India and any of the States in 
the Rewa Kantha Agency ; the general law and rules 
therefore apply (Government Notification No. 31 J. of 12 bh 
March 1875 and 87 J. of 16th August 1876 and G. R. 
No. 5557 of 9th September 1873). 

(b) Extradition ivith other States subject to the Govern* 
ment of Bombay s political superintendence.— See Government 
Itesolution No. 5235 of 22nd Augubtl873, para 3, and G. 
K. No. 258 of 14th January 1891. 

(c) Extradition ivith Rajputana States — See Government 
of Indies Letter No. 140 J. cf 8th September 1877. 

(d^ Extradition iciih Boroda — See Government Circular 
No. 250 of 14th January 1891. 

Salt. 

15. There is no production of salt in Rjewa Kantha. 
British salt is consumed. The importation of any other 
salt is prohibited, States are enjoined to keep a strict watch 
on the traffic and smuggling of salt is rare. Government 



380 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Resolution No. 1911 of 31st March 1876 directed that one 
half of the proceeds of smuggled salt seized in nativa 
state territory should be handed over to the State concerned* 

Opium. 

16. Engagements have been taken from the States 
in this Agency to prevent the cultivation of the poppy 
and illicit importation of opium, and the rules for possession, 
sale, and transit of opium framed by the Government of 
Bombay for adoption by Native States have been introduced 
into the States with the consent of the Chiefs. (G. R. Nos* 
31 73 and 3124 dated respectively the 21st May and 20th 
August 1885). 

Under these agreemants all States under this Agency 
are given the full duty on opium consumed in their respective 
limits. The Opium Regulations are thus in force in all 
Native States uniformly and are enforced by the Agency in 
6he Thana Circles. 

(b) Government Resolution No 3520 of 10th July 
1879, prescribed the manner in which opium C3nfhc*ted in a 
Native State in Gujarat siiould be disposed of. But as 
there is no opium warehouse of Government in this Agency* 
the con&sca&ed opiu n is disposed of by the State* themselves. 

Abkari. 

17. The First and SecDnd Class States have their 
own Abkari arrange uents; they hive adopted the central 
Distillery System, anl all off sue 33 are dealt with according 
to the provisions of the Abkari Act by thjir Magistrates. 
In the gmiller estates, Kadana, SanjMi and Jambughoda are 
the only States wiaiea hava separate arrangement, wada all 
the rest have give i over the mana^emant to the British 
Government receiving in return compensation on parcentage 
basis. The Abkari shops of the i^aniu Mawas including 
Bhadarva and Umetha have been amalgimued with those 
of the Panch Mahals District for the purple of the farm 



GOVERNMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 331 

and a separate contract is given by the Agency for liquor 
shops in the Sankheda Mewas. The separate shop system 
has been introduced in both the Mewases. 

Custom duties on imports into and exports from 
British India. 

18. Transit duties have been abolished by all States 
throughout Rewa Kantha. But import and export duties 
still continue to be levied by a majority of the States. Their 
tariffs vary, and Government do not interfere ia this matter. 
For the purposes of the Indian Tariff Acb as well as for 
those of opium and salt, the States in the Rewa Kantha 
have been declared by the Governor in Council to be foreign 
territoriee. 

Revenue Recovery. 

19. Under the Governor General in Council's Notification 
No. 1415 I. of 30th April 1890, Act I of 1890, the 
Revenue Recovery Act, applies to the Thana Circles of 

Kawa Kantha, and under it, revenue accruing in any part 
of British India may be recovered in those circles. As regards 
Native States of the higher classes, reciprocity of recovery 
without compulsory process is observed between Native 
States inter se, and between Native States and British 
Districts, in some cases only. 

News-papers. 

20. Rules regulating the editing, printing and 
publishing of newspapers &c, in any local area administered 
by the Governor General in Council, but not forming parti 
of British India, have been laid down in the Governor 
General in Council's Notification No. 2651 I of 25th June* 
1891, and apply to the Thana Circles. , 



GOVERNMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS* . 383> 

Rules and Regulations* 

Abkari* 

The principal States ia Rewa Kantha bava their owat 
Abkari arrangements, while the petty States, such a* 
Bhadarwa, Umetha and others forming the Smkheda and 
Pandu Mew^s hive handed over the control of abkari tc* 
the British Government. The Abkari Act and rules there- 
under, as may be promulgated for the neighbouring British 
Districts of Panch Mahals and Broach, are therefore appli- 
cable and a dministered in these areas. 



No. 3187 of 1913. 
Ahkari-Exemption from duty. Rewa Kantha Agency Office,, 

Godhra, 2nd August 1913+ 

NOTIFICATION. 

The Political Agent, Rewa Kaatha, is hereby pleased 
to exempt from duty country liquor which has been manifac- 
tured at the Jhari distillery in the B*ria Stata ani which 
is transported through the intervening territory of tha 
Jambughoda State to the shop3 of Bikrol, Jhijh*ri, Mi, 
Gamani, and Godali in the Rijg*ih Mahil of the Bum 
State, under permits issued by the Distillery Iaspacfcor, B*ria* 
subject to the following conditions : — 

(I) The liquor shall be conveyed by the under- 
mentioned route, 

From Baria to Piplod by road. 

From Piplod to Champ iner Road Station 
on the Godhra- Barodi Chord Railway* 

From Champaner Roa i Station to Shivrajpar 
Station by the Shivrajpar Light* 
Railway. 



384 BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

From the Shivrajpur Station to the afore- 
said villages by road through the 
Shivrajpur and Jambughoda States. 

(2) Each permit shall specify 

(a) the number and date thereof. 

(b) The nsme of the transporter. 

(c) The number and description of the vessel 
containing liquor. 

(d) The quantity and strength of liquor 
contained in each vessel- 

(e) The names of the places from and to which 
liquor is to be transported. 

(f) The mode of conveyance. 

(g) The date upto *?hich the permit shall hold 
good. 

(3) Liquor shall be taken in casks or kegs, and 
each such cask or keg shall be securely closed 
and sealed and shall have marked on it the 
quantity and strength of the liquor contained 
therein. 

W. GRAHAM, 

Acting Political Agent, 
Bewa Kant ha, and Collector, 

Panch Mahals* 



Masala liquor* 

Rules for the sale of Masala (sweetened and flavoured) 
liquor in SanJcheda Mewas in the Beica Kantha Agency* 
{sanctioned in Political Agenfs No. 2565 of 14th July 1915.) 

1. Masala liquor shall be issued from the Wadia Depot 
in bottles only, each bottle being ccrked, sealed and 
labelled. The se&l used should bear the words 
€i Wadia Liquor Depot." It shall ordinarily be kept 



GOVERNMENT RULES AKQ REGULATIONS. 3j^5 

with the Distillery Inspeotor, W*dia f and shall bp 
obtained from him when required. ',".," 

X. MasaU liquor shall be sold at tin following shops 
only:— 

I. Wadia. 2, Mianor. 3 Mandwa. 4. Bhiiidia. 
5. Rarrpura. 6. Vohrra. 7. Raninppura. 8. Agar. 
9. Naswadi. 10. Boriad, 11. Aiwa. 

3. Masaia liquor shall be sold in sealed bottles of 8 
drams and 4 drams capacity only. 

4. Eich bottle of maaala liquor shall bear a lab 1 showing 
clearly in Gujtrati the price quantity and strength of 
its contents & the flace cf manufacture. 

6. M-isala liquor shall be sold at prices not less than the 
sanctioned fates of excise duty and not exceeding 
Rs. 0-11-0 per bottle of 8 drams or Rs. 6 per 
bottle of 4 dr*ms. 

€. A sepnrate account of masaia liquor thall be kept at 
the shop in the £ rra used for ordinnry country spirit. 
The appar nt as woll as the real strength of m Hila 
liquor issued from th-a Widia U p>t shall be ah >wa 
ca the Transport permits under which it i& 
transported. 

C. HUDSON, 

Political Agent, 
Kewa Ktintha. 



Administrator General's *cw 

No. 855 dated Simla, the 16th April 29 3. 

In exercise ot the powers conferred by ,Secti<iQ 3 of 
the Administrator General's Act, 1874 (II of 1874), & in 
supercession of the noti6oati n of tie Government ot h\U% 
in. the Foreign Departmu.t No, 101 J. d aed 19 a J xly 1878* 
a^ subsequently amended and. No 812 E dated 19 ti Afjr4 
4890, except so far as they lelaieUo tLe Baluchistan Agoncy 
49 



3f6 BEWA KANTBA DIRECTORY. 

territories, and to the Parganas of Todgarh, Diwail, Saroth* 
Ch»ng and Kot Karana in Merwara, the Governor General 
in Council is pleased to direct that tha territories, save the 
portions aforesaid and Berar, of the States in Iniia named 
below sh^Il, for the purposes of the said Act, be include! im 
the Presidencies of Bengal, Madras & Bombay respectively 
as follows:— 

In the Presidency of Bombay. 

Baroda. 

Kalat, Las Vela. 

States in Central India. 

,, in Raj pu tan a. 

„ in political control of the Government 
of Bombay. 

Alienation Rules ♦ 

Rules for enquiry into alienated lands in the Ticwa-Kanth% 

Agency sanctioned in Government Resolution No. 3400 
of the t6th May 1896: — 

1. In the case of any land sold or granted in gift or 
any other description of inam before A. D. 1825 ( Simvafe 
1881 ), in which the sale or gant is supported by a djcumsutj 
which is proved, or about the genuineness of which no doabfc 
exists, tbough it can not be proved by evidence owin * to 
lapse of time, suca sale or grant shall be cjnScmed subject 
to the paytnsnt of the if 8aUmi" or quit rent which is no*r 
paid, or which may be leviable under the term* of tho 
document conveying the sale or grant. 

2. In the case of any land sold or granted in inam 
of any description before A D. 1823, in which the sale or 
grant is not supported by any document, but the undisputed 
possession ol the land for upwards of 6 b years ia proved* 
euch sale or grant shall be continued subject to a Battleuuafc 
*f 2 annas in the rupee cf the amount of assessment But 



GOVERNMENT EULES AND REGULATIONS. 38f 

if *ny ft Salami * be now paid on it And exceeds the amount 
of such settlement, the " Salami >y fchall be continued and' 
do settlement levied. 

3. In the case of any land mortgaged before A. D. 
1825 or thereafter, if the mortgage ia supported bv a docu- 
ment which is proved, or if no document exist?, if the 
undisturbed possession of th9 land prior to the n >ti5oibi>Q 
of A. D. 1848 be established the mortgage shall be rade^nai 
by the pavment of the m< r gage inoae/; if no docummt be 
fortbcnmiig rr other evidence to prove the mortgage or 
possession as aforesaid, the land shall b$ resumed. 

4. In the case of any Nnd sold after A. D 1825 and 
before the notification of A. D, 1848. in which the sale is 
supported by a document which is proved, or regarding the 
genuineness of which no doutt fxists, though it can not be 
proved by evidence ow:ng to lapse of time such sale shall t 
by virtue of the guarantee cf the British Government for 
the payment of the Gaekwar s tribnte f be considered a 
mortgage, ard the land cnve^ed by it redeemed by the 
payment of the puichnse money, pending which any "Salami" 
which is paid shall be continued. 

5. Any land s^>ld after the date o£ the notification of 
A. D. 1848, under a deed which is proved, shall be redeemed 
by the payment ot the purchase money. If there ba no 

I documentary evidence of the sale, but the undisturbed 
possession of the land be proved to have existed before A. D. 
1848, the land shall be resumed on the payment* of the 
purchase money. Pending redemption of the lana as afore- 
said, the *' Salami " on it shall be levied as heretofore, la 
the absence of any dicumeituy evidence or proof of 
fossessicn piior to A. D. 1848, the laud shall be resumed 
without any payment. J 

6. In tbe case of any land granted in gift or in any, 
other kind of in^m afier A. D. 1825, but before tin notification 
of 1848, in which the grant) is suppoited by a document. 



388 KEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. ' 

which is proved or regarding the germ'nenes3 of which no 

doubt exists though it can not be proved by evidence oaring 

to lapse of time, such grant shall be continued on the 

pavraent of a settlement of annas 2 in the rupee of ths 

amount of assessment. If there be no document regarding 

such land, but the undisputed posse*sioi of the land for 

Uf wards of 60 years is proved, such g a>t shill be continued 

subject to the payment of a settlement oc 4 annas in the 

rupee of the amount of assessment. In the case of lands 

the possession of which was « cquirod after 1848 without the 
sanction of the Political Agent, thi land .shall. b^ resumed* 

7. Any land or produce of land dev>tel t3 religious 

institutions or purposes shall be continued rent-free so long 

as it is applied to the purpose f>r w lich it wa* granted, 

and if it was granted to the devotee of any religious 

institution for service, it shall be continued to him subject 

to a settlement of 2 annas in the rupee of tie amjuat of 
assessment so long as he performs such service. 

8. In the case of any Jiwai land held by B hay ads 

for maintenance, which was sold before A D. 1825, such 

sale oeing supported by a document which is prwei, the 
land shall be continued subject to the p*yaie it of 4 annas 

in the rupee of the am »unii of as^essme 10. It' such lanJ 

was mortgaged before 1825, or sold or m>rtgtged after 182S 

and the sale or mortgage is suppartad by a d>3un3at which 

is proved, or if no dojument exists, the undisturbed pjs^eesba 

of the land prior to A. D. 1843 ba esta>lisiiei. the laai 

shall be redeemed on tae payment of th) amxiat fo: waica 

the land was sold or mor gag^d. In the ahsauje of any 

document or possession as aforesaid, the laad shall ba 
resumed. 

9. Land granted for service to village servant* useful 
to the holder of (ihe Estate, suca as RiVama-Daer-Baaug a- 
Pahauiara-Koombaar-Hakna-fclajain, etc., shall be oou&miad 
to t iem so long as the service is performed according to tua 
exigencies of the village from time to time. 



GOVERNMHNT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 380 

10. Land granted to other village servants useful to 

the community, suih as Uhamiria ( tanner), Lw*rs ( black- 

smiths), Sutars (carpenters), s-hall be continued to them so 

long as they continue to perform the service as heretofore,. 

on payment of a settlement of 2 annas in the rupee of the* 
assessment. 

11. Hadia land given as compensation for a murder,, 
the grant being supported by a document or by undisputed 
possession (for upwards of 60 years), shall be continued. 

12. Land given acording to custom to provide* 
clothing tor the daughter of an estate-holder, the grant of 
which is supported by a document or by possession, shall bfr 
continued during the life time of such daughter to such 
extent as is deemed reasonable in cDnsideiabiou of the status 
of the Taluka. 

13. Land granted in dowry before A. D 1848* tha 

grant of which is supported by a document, sh*li be continued 

to such extent as may be deemed reasonable upon consideration 

of the status of the Taluka. But in the absence of any 

document supporting the grant, it the possession of the land 

or the right to its revenue has been enjoyed by the claimant 

prior to A. D. 1848 ; the land shall be continued during her 

life time. Any such grant made after 1848 shall not be* 
upheld. 

14. Any land or village granted to < : Patawats" for 
feudal service before A. D. 1825, the grant of which is 
supported by a document or by undisputed possession for 60 
years shall be continued rent free to lineal male descendants 
of the original grantees on their agreeing t> continue to 
render such service, subject to the continuance of the paymentt 
of any 'salami 5 ' winch may now be paid. In the case of 
any such grants made after A. D. 1825 but (> before A. D* 
1848 and supported by documentary evidence oc by proof 
o£ possession betore A. D. 1848, they shall be continued 
under the same conditions as aforesaid (viz. to lineal mala 
descendants of the original grantees on condition of service]^ 



?90 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

en the payment of a settlement of 4 anna? in the rupee of 

the assessment. Where there is no document to surp rb thfr 

gfrant r>r nroof of possession anterior to A, D. 1843, suoh 
grant shall be resumed. 

15. Any land or village, claimed to he held on griras 
tenure and proved to have been acquired before A, D. 1825, 
shall be continued on the paj merit of a settlement of 2 
annas in the rupee on the assessment or the ,c Snlarai " i,ovv 
pad, whichever may be the greater. Claims on s : m'»lar 
tenure in which the land was acquired after 1825 but before 
1848, if supported by documentary evidence or by proof of 
possession before A. D. 1843, shall ^e admitted on paym<nfe 
of a sett era en t of annas 4 in the rupee of the assessments 
In the absence of documentary evidence or if the grant wer* 

acquired after 1848! the claim shill be rejected, and the land 

resumed. 

16. In the cases of estates other than those of the 
Sankheda and PanHu Mewas, the >ear in which the 
Political control over the estate was vested in the British 
Government, which in the case of estates oiignally included 
in the Mahikanth* arrangements was A. D. 1320, should 
be substituted for ' A. D. 1825' wherever ths words occur 
in the aforesaid rules. 



Appeals in Alienation Gases. 

No. 2381 of 1906. 

Godhra. 14th December 1906. 

CIRCULAR 

Government have directed that fcr purposes cf appaal 

in Alitnation Enquiry cases, a period ot 90 days thauld ba 

t fixed as in revenus matters, and that such appeals are to be 

disposed of by the Commissiouer N. D. under the orders 

contained in oa^as 2 and 3 of G. K. No. 5852 dated 16t>h 
December 1878, 

K. C. BROWN, 
I I ohtioai Agent. 



GOVERHMEHT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 301 

Arms Rules; 

Fees from marriage parties not to be levied. 

To, 

The Chiefs, Thakors and Thandars of Rewa Kantha. 

A letter was some time back addressed to ycu to 
abolish the custom of taking Par van a fees from marriage 
parties parsing through your territories, because such custoa 
appears inappropriate. The matter was reported to thfr 
Bombay Government, who in its order No. 3183 dated 23rd 
June 1 8 f 6 directs that you should not take par wan a fees 
from the subjects of the Company Sircar or any other State> 
and that* you may take parwana fees from your subjects, if 
you like. You should therefore act accordingly. Dated 30th 
June i856 A. D. 

Arms* — Pancana should be taken for armed men 
going beyond State limits. 

No. 979 of 1857. 

To. 

The Chiefs and Thakors op Hewa Kantha* 

If you have need of keeph g any of your sepoys outside 
your territories, or of sending any armed sibandy beyond 
your territories on any business, you should take English 
Parwana from me. If any persons are found wandering or* 
pretence of service or with arins without EngLsh Parwana* 
under my signature, they will be arrested ani punished. 

This letter is written in pursuance of an English letter 
of the Political Cammissioner, Gujarat dated 14th August 
1857 camp, D*hod. 

Note. — Similar instructions was repeated by Notification 
No. 1208 of 23rd September 1857. 



GOVERNMENT BULKS 4ND REGULATIGHS. ^3?$ 

Arms Rules. 

NOTIFICATION. 

No. 524 o£ 1903. 

Camp Chanod, 24th March 190$. 

The following Rules relating to the control of arms 
and ammunition in the Thana Circles in this Agency have 
been approved and sanctioned by Government and are 
published for general information. 

Similar Rules have been introduced in the States under 
the Agency. 

G. CARMICHAEL, 

Political Agent, Rewa Kant ha. 



REWA KANTHA AGENCY ARMS RULES. 

Section 1. — These Rules may be cited " the Rewa 
Kantha Agency Arms Rules/ 9 and 
Short Title. &ppty to th Q Thana Circles under the 

Agency. 

Section 2. — Arms cr ammunition may be imported into 

the Thana Circles under the Agency 
Import oE arms and t , ,. , . ., 

ammunition. on, y und ^ r » license and in the mannar 

and to the extent permitted 1 thereby, 
and in strict conformity with the Rules regulating export in 
the area from which the arms or ammunition are to be 
imported. 

Section 3. — No arms or ammunition shall be exported 

from the Rewa Kantha Agency into 

EXP — r n. and British India, cr any Native State* 

adjoining, except under a license and in 
the manner and to the extent permitted* thereby and in 
strict, accordance with any law or rules in force there for 
the- regulation ct possession anct import of irms and 
ammunition. 
50 



L BEWA KAKTHA DIBECTOBY. 

Secticn 4 # — The transport of arms or ammunition 

within the limits of the Rewa Kantha 

irTniUol 8 ™ 3 A &™y wil1 ^ subject to such rules 

or limitations as the Political Agent 

Cod it necessary from time to time to prescribe. 

Section 5.— Nothing in Section 2 or Section 4 shall be 
deemed to extend to arms or ammuni- 

^^tsT*™ 7 tion im P° rt9d <* transported in reason- 

able quantities for his own private w a 
Iqp e*iy person lawfully entitled to possess the same. 

Section 6. — No person is allowed to sell arms or 
ammunition in ths Rewa Kantha 

Sako£ arms ond Agency except under a license (Form 
«n&unihon. , . . 

A) and m the manner and to the 

extent permitted thereby, and no arms or ammunition shall 

fee sold to any person not entitled to possess the s.me 

wider this law or any rule made under it. 

Provided that nothing herein contained shall be 
^teemed to require any person to t*ke out a license for selling 
mmj arms or ammunition which he lawfully posseses for his 
«wa private use to any person entitled to possess the s^me, 
wu&et this law or any rule made under it. 

Motion 7. — No person is allowed to manufacture arms 
cr ammunition except under a license 

mfacture of arms ( in Form A) in the manner and to tihe 
ammunition. N ' 

extent permits d thereby. 

Section 8 (a}. — Subjects of the Thana Circles may 
&8 arms other than tire-arms and ammunition for private 
_ w and go armed with the same as hithert?, but ths 
JRoiitical Agent reserves complete po.ver : — 

(i) to regulate the wearing or use of arms by 
special classes or at special times or in particular 
localities; and 



GOVERNMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

(ii) to prohibit any particular person fro n poasessw^ 
or going armed with particular kinda ef 
weapons in the Agency or in any part of iK 

(b) Subjects of the Thana Circles, except thoaa 
speci6ed in Schedule A, are prohibited from fira- 
arms or ammunition, or going armed with th* 
same, except unJer a license and in the rmrmer 
and to the extent permitted thereby. 

(c) Foreign subjects, except those specified in Schedtafe 
A, are prohibited from possessing arms or a>inra- 
nition of any kind whatsoever or going arnaai 
except under a license and in the manner and too 
the extent permitted thereby. 

Provided that bride-grooms going to marry s&sB 
not be compelled to take out licenses for tlw 
arms usually carried by them on sush occisiaas^ 

(d) Licenses nnder this Section shall be of tw& 
kindp, viz ; — 

(1) permanent, coloured green, which imy bs 
granted by the Political Agent ( Form B|> 
and 

(2) temporary, coloured red, which may be 
granted by the Ufc Class Magistrate, awl, 
shall not extend to a period exceeding vim 
year (Form C.) 

Section 9.— Only temporary licenses may be grantedL 

to foreigners an! only with the pre vie tsm 
Licences to foreign . c -n.-.t * 

subjects. sanction cf the Political Agent. 

Section 10. — Licensees to possess arms or amm initios* 

or to go armed shall, on demand, $&%>m 

Inspection of: their licenses and the arrbs and aromaa- 

licenses 

nition covered by the license to aogpr 

Magistrate or Police officer not below the raiik of Foujdar«. 



zii" 



REWA KANTHA EIBECTOR^ 



Section ll.—The 1st Class Ma- 

egis er o icenses. gi s trat^ shall keep registers showing: — 

(i) Licenses granted by him, and 
(ii) Applications for licenses which he has refused. 
Section 12.— Applications for licenses to go armed oa 

T .. a journey through British India must 

Journey licenses. , , . , , ^ ,. 

be submitted to the Political A^ent. 

Rewa Kantha, throagh the Thanadars. 

Section 13. — Consistently with the provisions of this 

law the Political Agent may make 
Power to make . , -. , r 

ru ] es< rules and afterwards may, from time to 

time, repeal, alter or amend the same, 

as occasion may require, regulating the grant of licenses, the 

form in which and the terms and conditions subject to 

which licenses may be granted; the fees to be charged 

therefcr ; the mode in which such fees are to be recovered ; 

the Officers by whom particular licenses maybe granted; and 

*>11 other matters connected with the purposes of this law^ 

., Section 14.— It will be entirely in the discretion of 

„ P1 . _. the Political Agent to grant, refuse 

(xi ant of license dis- , , . , 

erefcionary. or r©vcke any license under this law. 

Section 15.— A license granted under this law may, 
for sufficient reasons to be recorded in 

Cancellation or sus- writing, be cancelled or suspended by 
pension ot licenses. ~L . 

the officer by whom the same was 

pranted or by any authcri&y to whom such officer may be 

subordinate. 

Section 16.— All licensees under Section 6 or 7 of this 

;. •;, Jaw will be bound to conform strictly to 

Obligations on licensees. , . . /» ., • ,- , ' , • 

< the provisions or their licenses and this 

kw, to obey ail orders issued under this law, to store arms* 

ammunition or gunpowder as directed, to keep correct* 

accounts of all receipts and issues with full particulars of 



GOVERNMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 387 

purchases : and 'to keep their promises open for inspection 
and search at any time by any officer generally or specially 
authcriz9d by the Political Agent in that behalf. 

Section 17. — All purchasers are hereby declared to be 

legally bound too give full information 
Obligations on n , , c 

purchasers. to uiauutacburars or vandsrs ot arms, 

ammunition or gunpowder whan called 
upon to do so- 

Section 18. — A brief but complete annual return of all 

fire-arms in the Agaacy shall be prepared 
Return of fire-arms. 

annually by the Superintendent of Police 

as soon after 30fch Juae as may be, and submitted to the 

Political Agent. All persons are hereby declared to ba legally 

bound to furnish correct information as to fire-arms in their 

possession, when called upon to do so by a Police officer not* 

inferior in rank to an officer in chirge of a Police Station 

cr by a Magistrate. 

Section 19. — Whoever is guilty of any act or omission 
in contravention of this law, or fails or 
Punishment for guilt refuses to ■ information which he 

or deiault in giving ° m J 

information. is bound to give by this law, or givea 

any information which he is bound by 
this law to give as correct, which he knows or has reason to 
believe to be false shall, on conviction before a Magistrate, 
be punished with imprisonment, of either description for a 
term which may extend to six months or with fine which 
may extend to one thousand rupees or with both, but in the 
case of licensees the previous sanction of the Agency and in 
other casas that o£ the 1st Class Magistrate will be necessary 
to any such prosecution. Nothing contained in this section 
shall bar a prosecution under any ether latf for an act or 
ommission which is an offence under ttiat law, but no ona 
fchali be punished twice for the same offence. 



$95 BEWA KANTHA D1BECT0RY. 

Section 20.— In addition to any penalty inflicted under 

Section 19, aDy arms or ammunition in 

Power to confiscate. respecfc of ' ^ hich 8n offence haB been 

committed may be confiscated under the orders of the trying 
Magistrate. 

Section 21,— The Political Agent may, by a notification, 

exempt any per3on by name or in virtue 
Power to exempt. rf ^ ^^ cr any c]ftas of person ^ or 

exclude any description of arms or ammunition from the 
operation of any prohibition or direction contained in this 
law, and may cancel or modify such notification. 

Section 22. — The expressions " arms and ammunition " 

bear in this law the meaning which 
Definition of terms. they ^ defined tQ haye in thQ Britigh 

Arms Act, but nothing contained in this law is to be con- 
strued as prohibiting the repair cf arms, or as relating to 
bows and arrows, or to the manufacturing of powder for 
fireworks. 



SCHEDULE A. 



List of persona or classes of persons exempted from the 
operation of the prohibitions contained in tho rules of the 
Bewa Kjintha Agency relating to arms and ammunition 
other than those referring to cannons, articles designed for 
torpedo service, war rcckets and machinery for the manufacture 
of arms and ammunition. 



1. All persons, wr.o, if in British India, would be 
exempted from the operation of the Indian Arms Act. 

2. All jurisdictional and non*jurisdictional Taiukdats 
of Rewa Kantha whose names are on separate tribute-payer's 
list 



GOVERNMENT BULBS AND REGULATIONS. 



39» 



3. All travellers carrying arms or ammunition, bo far 
as their arms or amniunitioi may ba covered by a permife 
in due form signed by a duly qualified British Officer, or 
any competent offiser of a jurisdictional State. 

4. Any persons oE approved loyalty and good poaitioa 
who are specially exenpted by notification issaed by the 
Agency from time to time. 

FORM A. 

License to manufacture, convert, sell or keep Arms. 
Ammunition and Military Stores. 



Name, &c, of 
license holder 


Place of 

business, 

factory and 

shop. 


Description of Arms. 


Description of Ammuni- 
tion & Military stores. 


© 

§88 


and place of 
residence. 


To be manu- 
factured. 


To be kept 
and sold. 


To be manu- 
factured. 


To be Kept 
and sold. 

















( Signature of) 

Officer granting the license. 



Note :— 



For conditions of this license see reverse. 



Thh license is given subject to the provisions of the 
Rewa Kantha Aganoy Arms Regulations. 

The license holder stall keep records ktid accounts of 
all arms made or converted, of all ammunition manufactured* 
of all stock in hand, and of all salos in saoh form aa th* 
Political Agent may from time to time direct. 



400 REW4< KANTHA MBBCTORY. 

The license holder shall exhibit; his stock and his books 
of manufacture and sale to any Magistrate or to any Police 
Officer not below the rank of Foujdar, when such officer may 
call upon him to do so. 

The license holder shall affix to his shop or place of 
business a sign board intimating his name and the nature of 
his license. 

The license holder shall, at the time of the purchase-, 
endorse upon the license of every purchaser holding a license 
under Forms B and C the following particulers : — 

( 1 ) The name and address of the person who takes 
delivery of the articles sold, 

( 2 ) The nature and amount of the articles sold, 

( 3 ) The date of sale, 

and shall append his signature tp the endorsement. 

He shall maintain at his shop a similar record of every 
sale of arms or ammunition whether the purchaser is a 
licensed holder or is exempt under the rules. 




GOVEBNMENT KCIiES AND BEGDLATIONS. 



4Q1 



ft 

o 

&4 



s 

;-• 
s- 
<*• 

o 

a 

GO 

OB 
00 
<D 
09 
CO 

O 



<D 
w 

a 



c 

a § 
Jk. d_ 



51 



Particulars of Arms. 


•s^xnag 


1 


•pdnQ 




•OOU^rj 






®JI a H 




•J9d3«(J 




•pao^g 




a 
O 


CO 

»■-< 

a 

_£ CD 

o S 






05 
P 




Description of 
his person. 




Inhabitant 
of. 




o 

-4-> 

CfJ 

o 




c3 
< 




CD 

B 


) 




6 




i 

1 ! 



.2? 

GQ 



4 



402 



EBWA KAMTHA DIBECTOBT. 



O 

a 

o 
•ft) 



a 

S-4 

CO 
>> 

»-■ 

CO 

o 



CO 

m 
m 

» 

08 

o 



act 
G 

S 

t~3 



a 

o 
H 



© 



•sqiBraa-g 




to 




no _js 
_ °* 

O o 

PR 




Purpose for 

which license 

is given. 




Description 
oi: his person. 




-*3 

S3 

if 

cti O 

a 




a 
o 

CU 

S-' 
o 

M 




i 

Q 








Name of the person 

to whom license 

is given. 




d 
53 





0/ 

ft* 
CO 

c 

55 






GOVERHMIJNT BULES AND REGULATIONS. 4Q3 

Boundary Disputes* 

Rules for the settlement of boundary disputes between the 
Baroda State and the other adjoining Native States and 
British Districts {sanctioned by Government in 1877-78 ) 

1. A representative from each State or District 
concerned shall attend the Boundary Officer at the disputed 
boundary. Such representative shall be provided with full 
written authority to acb on behalf of trie State or District 
in all matters relating to the boundary settlement, ani his 
acts and proce3dings in relation to the settlement shall be 
conclusive and binding upon the State or District which he 
represents. 

The written authority, with which eaoh representative 
is famished, shall be taken by the Boundary Officer and filed 
in his records. 

2. The Boundary Offioer shall give written information 
to the States or District3 concerned of the boundary disputes 
which he proposes to taka up, with the approximat3 dates 
on which he proposes to comnence the inquiry or inquiries. 

3. The Boundary Officer, in addition to the general 
notica given in accordance with Rule 2, shall, ten days 
before taking up a dispute, warn the representatives of the 
exact date on which the investigation will be commenced. 

4. On the arrival of the Boundary Officer on the 
ground in dispute, he shall call upon the representatives to 
show their claims. Each representativa shall mark out his 
claim by flags in the presence of the B>uudary offioer and 
other representatives. When they have done so, they shall 
be allowed to have some reasonable time to understand fully 
and completely each other's claims in view to determine 
accurately the points of dispute between them; and if they 
so wish, to amend the lines they h*d marked out to show 
their plaiqas. After this the representatives shall ba warnad 
that no fresh chim will after this be permitted, nor any 



404 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

change in the ground, nature, or extent o£ the claim. Ther 
claims shown shall be mapped, and the map, attested by 
the signature of the Boundary Officer, shall be filed with 
the record ; and a copy of the map shall be given to each, 
representative of the States or Districts concerned. The 
map shall be drawn t> scale, and shall show accurately the 
lines or boundary claimed by the C3nt9nding parties, the 
cultivated and waste ground in the vicinity of the disputed 
b3undary, and any other natural features which may tend 
to facilitate the understanding of the case. 

5. The authorized representatives of the Native States 
and British Districts deputed to attend on the Bauudary 
Officer shall not, oa any pretext, leave him without hi3 
permission. Such permission, if givea, shall b3 fo: a strictly 
stated period ; and if the Boundary Officar thinks propar, he 
may, before granting such permission, require the rep resent *tiv3 
to be relieved by another representative furnished with the 
authority described in Rule 1. 

6. In cases in which the boundary in dispute lies 
between one village on tha one side and more than one 
village on the other, or between more than one village oa 
either side, a separate reoord shall be prepared for each 

village concerned. 

Examples: — (a) A boundary is in dispute between 
village A in the State of X, ani villages B., G. f 
and D in the State of Y; a separate record shall 
be prepared for the dispute betwaen A, and B, and 
A. and 0., and A. and D. 

(b.) A boundary is in dispute between village D in the 
btite of X, and villages B and C in the State of 
Y, aud between village D in the State of X, and 
villages C and E in the State of Y. A separate 
record shall be prepared for the dispute between A 
*nd B, A and C, D and C, and D and E. 



GOVERNMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 405 

7. Pending sobtlement of the dispute both parties 
shall be forbidden to perform in the disputed tract any act 
involving proprietorship, and the Boundary Offisor shall mike 
such temporary arrangements as may S9em to him suitable 
for the preservation of properoy on the Und, or for the 
cultivation of the land, or for the preservation o£ the produce, 
or the proceeds of the sale thereof. 

II. — Of Settlement by Agreement. 

8. The disputing parties shall, in the first instance, 
be allowed a definite time, usually one or two days, and in 
no case, more than a week, within which to agree on the 
boundary between themselves. 

9. If an agreement be thus effected, the Boundary 
Officer shall cause the fact to be recorded, and shall file with 
his record the original agreement signed by the represent- 
atives of the States or D stricts concerned, and attested by 
him. He shall then map the boundary so agreed upon, ani 
cause it to be demarcated with masonry pillars. 

10. The Boundary Officer shall prepare and file with 
the record a full statement in narrative form of his proceed- 
ings in the case aad of the settlement effected; and shall 
furaish to each representative a copy of this statement ani 
of the map referred to in the preceding rule as soon as 
possible. 

11. There shall be no appeal in the case of a settle- 
ment effected as above by mutual agreement. 

III. — Of Settlement by Arbitration , <$fc. 

12. If the parties fail to effect a mutual agreement p$ 
above, the Boundary Officer shall record tha fact. The dis- 
putants shall then be allowed a definite time, usually one or 
two days, and in no case exceeding a week, vjjithiu which to 
agree to the settlement of the bomdary, 

(a) by a panchayat of men agreed to oa both sides; or 

(b) by & single arbitrator similarly agreed to; or 



406 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

(c) by one or more men agreed to on both sides- 
walking the boundary under an oath; or 

(d) in any other way agreeable to the customs of the 
District to which both parties give their consent. 

18, The agreement to settle the case by one or other 
of the modes described in the preceding rule shall be in 
writing. It shall be signed by the Bundary Officer, as also 
by the representatives of the States and Districts, and whenever 
practicable by the Zamindars concerned, and filed with the 
record of the case before any step3 are taken to effect the 
settlement under the terms thereof. 

14. The settlement shall be proceeded with in tha 
manner agreed on as soon as possible after the agreement is 
filed under Rule 13, and the Boundary Officer shall fix a, 
reasonable time within which the settlement shall be concluded. 
Such period may be extended by the Boundary Officer for 
good and sufficient reason shown. 

15. If a settlement be effected by any of the methods 
provided by Rule 12, no evidence shall be adduced or recorded. 
The Boundary Officer shall record the mode by which the 
settlement was effected, and shall then proceed as provide! 
for in Rules 9 and 10. 

16. There shall be no appeal from a settlement effected 
under Rule 12, except on the ground of corruption or 
misconduct on the part of one or more of tha persons 
whose proceedings were material to the settlement. Any 
application to set aside the settlement shall be made to fetie 
Boundary Officer within ten days after the settlement has* 
been accorded. 

IV.— Of Settlement by the Boundary Officer* 

17. If the parties do not agree to the boundary as 
provided in Rule 8, cr to the settlement of it by any o£ 
the modes described in Rule 12, or if, having agreed, the 
settlement be not effected within the time allowed under 



GOVERNMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 407 

Rule 14, the Boundary Officer shall record the fact and shall 
then proceed to settle the case him^lf. He shall call upon 
tihe representatives of each Sbate or District concerned to 
i3tate whether they agree to abide by his decision, or desire 
to reserve to themselves the right to appeal. He shall record 
their replv, and then call on them to give in, within a 
reasonable time, which is to be specified, a written statement 
of their claim, a list of the witnesses they propose to call, 
and an abstract of the evidence. At the same time the 
parties shall be called upon to give in, as far as possible, 
all the original documents they may wish to pat in as 
evidence; and on the application of a party, copies of the 
documents tendered by the opposite p*rty shall be given, and 
every opportunity afforded to inspect the originals. He shall 
then proceed to settle the case on its merits, unless inter- 
mediately the parties tender a written statement under Rule 
8, or unless, in cases in which a written agreement to settle 
under Rule 12 has not already been made, the parties tender 
such a written agreement. 

18. If, on the date fixed under Rules 2 and 3, or on 
^ny other day to which the ease may be postponed under 
these Rules, the accredited representative of either party 
does not appear; or if, during the investigation, the repre- 
sentative of either party takes his departure without the 
the permission of the Boundary Officer, the Boundary Officer 
shall record the feet, and investigate and determine the case 
^m parte. 

19. The Boundary Officer shall hear and record the 
evidence on both sides. Tha parties shall be allowed to 
produce rebutting evidence. They may also be allowed to 
produce new or additional evidence, if sufficient cause be 
shown for its non-production at first The Boundary Officer 
may call for evidence in addition to that produced by the 
parties, and shall particularly inquire for, and have regard 
to, old records or previous settlements bearing on the disputed 



408 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

7 • », ... . . ..,,.. ... 

boundary. He is, in short, to adopt every practicable means* 
for arriving at a just decision, 

20. The decision of the Boundary Officer shall be in 
writing and signed by him. It shall 4 contain in narrative 
form a full statement of his proceedings in the case, and 
feball set forth the grounds advanced by each party in support 
of its claim, and the grounds on which his judgment is- 
based, and it shall be delivered by the Boundary Offieer in 
the presence of the parties. 

21. At the time of giving his decision the Boundary 
Officer shall invite the authorized representatives of the 
States or Districts concerned to signify in writing their 
acceptance of it. If they accept it, the acceptance shall be 
attested by the Boundary Officer and filed with the recoid. 
The decision shall thereupon be final and there shall be no 
appeal from it. If either or both decline to accept it, the 
Boundary Officer shall record the fact. 

22. 0n giving his decision the Boundary Officer shall 
cause the line as settled to be carefully mapped, and shall 
file with the record a map showing the claims of each party 
and the line settled by him. 

23 # The Boundary Officer shall furnish to each repre- 
sentative, as soon as possible, a copy of his decision, and of 
the map, and of the acceptance thereof, if such has beea 
given and filed. 

24. When the representative of both sides accept the 
decision of the Boundary Officer, ho shall cau3e masonry 
pillars to be built demarcating the boundary settled. In cases 
in which boih parties do not accepb the decision of the 
Boundary Officer, temporary marks shall be made, and pillars 
built after the decision has been confirmed by higher authority; 
or, in the event of an appeal not having been preferred, after 
the t me for appealing is past. 



GOVERNMENT BULES AND REG^pUATlONS. 40& 

25. During the investigation of the case the Boundary 
Officer may grant such postponement from time to time as 
be may consider necessary. 

26. If either party causes unnecessary delay, or in 
any way wilfully obstructs the proceedings of thi case at 
any stsge, any additional expense that may be caused 
thereby shall if the Boundary Officer so determine; be 
charged to, and recovered from, the party causing delay or 
obstruction. 

V. — 0/ Appeal from the Settlement by the Boundary Officer 
in cases in ivhich his decision has not been agreed as 
final (Rule 17). 

27. An appeal may be made by either party 
to the Revenue Commissi ner of the Northern Division of 
ibe Bombay Presidency, excejt where parties have agreed 
to abide by the decision of the Officer as provided by 
Rule 17. 

28. If the Revenue Commissioner of the Northern 
Division confirms she decision of the Boundar/ Officer, the 
decision shall be final, and there shall be no further appeal. 
If the Revenue Commissioner of the Northern Division 
modifies or reverses the decision of the Boundary Officer, an 
appeal may be made to the Governor General of India in 
Council, whose decision shall be final. 

29. A certified copy of the decision of the Revenue 
Commissioner of the Northern Div,sion shall be given to> 
«ach party or transmitted to them as soon a9 practicable. 

30. Appeals shall be in the form of a memorandum, 
which shall set forth, concisely and under distinct heads, tha 
grounds of objection to the* decisions appealed against without 
any argument or narrative; and shall, it the decision 
appealed against be that of the Boundary Officer, be delivered 
to the Revenue Commissioner of the Northern Division 

52 



i4lt) ' BBWA KAKTHA DIBHCTORY. 

within sixty days from the date on which ths Boundary 
Officer gave the representative a copy of his decision and of 
the map; and that ot the Revenue Commissioner of the 
Northern Division within sixty days from the date on which 
the copy of the decision was given to the representative. Ip 
the case pf appeals to the Governor General in Council, th^ 
memorandum of appeal may be accompanied by a statement 
of the arguments of the appealing party. It shall ba compe- 
tent to the Appellate authorities to extend the period allowed 
for appeal on sufficient cause being shown. 

VI —On the preservation of the Boundary. 

31. After the permanent pillars have been erected on 
a boundary, if any be destroyed or injured, inquiry shall be 
made into the circumstances. The Sta,te, to the subjects of 
which the damage is traced, shall be liable, on the judgment* 
of the Agent to the Governor General, to a payment not* 
exceeding Rs. 1000 by way of penalty for the offence of its 
{subjects. It it is impossible to trace the actual culprits, the 
fctate against which the decision was given, shall be held 
responsible, and be liable to the said payment. [ 

32. If'fiiuch inquiry be done after the expiry of te«n 
years irom the date of the completion of the pillars, tfcie 
case shall be dealt witn as the A^enfc of the Governor 
General may at the time determiue on a consideration of 
the circumstances of the case. * 

VII. — Miscellaneois. 

33. These Rules shall, mutatis mutandis, apply, to .e$s$3 
in which the dispute is not regarding the actual boundary 
between one vilhge and another, but whether a particular 
Village or villages, the boundaries of which m*y or m*y nob 
be disputed, belong to one Stake or ano:her. 

34. In oases referred to in the preceding Rule^ 
possession in the ease ot disputes between Mahi K%nfcaa and 



GOVERHMHNT BUMS AND BBGULJLTIOHS. 411 

Baroda, and Palanpnr and Baroda, in the year 1820, and in 
the case of disputes between Rewa Kantha and Baroda in 
thp year 1825, and in the case of disputes between British 
District^ and Baroda in the year 1826, shall, determine the 
right, unless subsequently the matter have been otherwise 
determined ,by competent authority, or unless uninterru ;ted 
adverse possession for a period of 25 years be pr ved. 

35. The Boundary Officer shall submit an Eaojli^h 
report on each case settled by any of the preceding Rales, 
with copies of the vernacular papers given by him to th^ 
representatives, to the Revenue Commissioner for the 
Northern Division. 

Boundaries at rivers* 

To be fixed in the middle of permanent banks. 

( Translation from Gujarati. ) 

No. 59 of 1886. 

Where rivers are situated on the frontiers of dis^riots 
of the British Government and Native States, the boundaries 
have hitherto been fixed at the centre of the m*in stream 
of rivers, whioh is highly inconvenient. In Gjjirab, ths 
rivers are flooded upto banks in the rainy season and these 
banks are constant. But for the greater p*rb oE trie year, 
rivers flow Zigzag through the sandy bed, an i the main 
course is undoubtedly subject to fluctuations; so ib is mora 
convenient to fix boundaries in the middle of the permanent 
banks. This has been sdopted by the Rev3nue Survey 
Department and pn a dispute arising in 1878, the Gaekwar 
Government has also agreed to it;. A Resolution from 
Government No. 7490 of I9ta Dicembar 1885 has now been 
received asking that the States of Rewakanoh* may be 
advised as to the convenience o£ fixing t bo&ndary. midway 
between the permanent banks. Ypa are ttiarefore. informed 
that the principle above-mentioned is worthy of approval, 



4J# 5 ,,. BBWA KAHTHA DIRECTORY. 

and thereby the constant change and dispute regarding 
boundaries would be avoided. Sometimes disputes arise owing 
to the change in the flow of a river, or when the stream 
divides itself into two courses. Thi3 woild also be removed; 
and there is no disadvantage in adopting this CDU'se. There- 
fore looking to all these fact?, I hope you will kin 11 7 agree 
to the boundary being fix id for the sake of convenience at 
the middle point of the two opposite banks of the rivar. 
Dated 4th February 1886. 



No. 3656. 

Political Depabtment, 

Bombay Castle, 6th June 1887. 

Memorandum from the Commissioner, N. D., No. 314 
dated 4th May 1887,:- Submitting for consideration, a letter 
to his address from tbe Political Agent, Raw* Kanfcha, who 
brings to notice the serious diflnukies tint woald be exoerincei 
in the Rewa Kaatha in giving effect to the orders of 
Government, 

(1) that the line mid-wa7 between permanent rivar banks 
is to be the boundary of riv<>r-30parated stttes, and 

(2) that this mid-bau'c boundary is to be enforced not 
only in present or future disputes but in previously 
settled oases ( Government Rjaolutions Nos. 749$ 
and 3243 dated respectively the 19 sh December 
1885 and 7th June 1886), states ( parag-ap^i 10 ) 
that he is of opinion that if Government decide to 
enforce the mid-bink line, that two points should be 
noticed, viz, (1) the change should be declared to have 
no back effect/ and (2) the proviso should ba added 
that to whatever side of the midbmk line the flotf 
of water may press, e ich river tank vdlaga ha* aa 
equal claim to the use of the water making ram irk ^ 



GOVERKMBNT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 413 

Resolution. — Th9 only two States in the RewaKantha 
m respoot ot which there is any objection to the acceptance 
of the proposal that between river divided States the boundary 
should be hence forward deemed to be the mid— bank line 
instead of the mid-stream line are Rajpipla and Bhadarwa. 
In the case o£ the former, the British Government would 
lose very largely by the adoption ot the proposal; in the 
case of the latter, the Thakor would lo3e a yearly revenue 
of Rs. 178, and he therefore objects to the change. 

2. These two States being excepted, it may b9 taken 
to be the rule for the future in the Rewa Kantha, that by 
consent of all parties the boundary between states separated 
from each other or from British territory by a river, shall 
be deemed to be fixed mid-way between the permanent banks; 
but this rule is subject to the proviso that each village on a 
river bank has an equal claim to the use of the water of the 
river, whether the stream flows for the time being on one 
side or the other of the mid-bank boundary line. 

3. The Political Agent should communis ite the purpor 
of this Resolution to all the States in the Agency except} 
Rajpipla and Bhadarwa. The boundary line between the 
excepted States and British territory will remain as hereto* 
fore. . , 

Nos. 384 to 388 of 1887. 
To, 

All Chiefs of the Rewa Kantha. 

Some time ago a circular letter was written to you 
with regard to considering the middle point of rivers which 
separate one state's limits fr>n another as the boundary 
between thorn, and replies to the same were received. All 
the circumstances were submitted to the Bom boy Gtavemmant, 
who have now passed Resolution No. 3656 dated 6th June 
1857, wherein it is directed that) the following rule should 
be observed as regards Rewa Kantha. 



414 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

By consent of all parties the boundaries between Statas 
separated from each other or from British territory by or 
fiver shall be deemed to be fixed midway between the per* 
manent banks, but this rule is subject to the proviso that 
each village on a river bank has an equal claim to the qse 
of the water of the river, whether the stream flows for the 
time beicg on one side or the other of the mid-bank boundary 
line. . Dated 21st July 1887. 

Note — This was not communicated to the states of 
Rajpipla and Bbadarwa, because they did nob agree to th© 
rule, and the boundary line between them and British territory 
has ben held to be as heretofore. 




BOBBER COUBT BULBS* 41& 

BORDER COURT RULES. 



Rules for the guidance of Courts for the settlement of claims 
between border states of Rajputann and Gujarat (sanctioned 
in Government Resolution No. 5469 of 29th September 
1877.) 

The Courts shall consist of the two British offisera 
who may be in Political charge of the States concerned ; 
they shall be aufcborizsd to dispose of all ca^es which may 
be brought before them, witn power to rafer any case or 
cases to local Panchayats composed of persons on the spot. 

2. Complaints brought by persons against the State, 
or the subjects of the State to which they belong, shall not 
be heard by the Court. 

3. Complaints brought by persons against the State 
to which they do not themselves belong, shall not be heard 
by the Court, if at the time of the act complained of, the 
complainant shall have resided in such state for six months 
ooniinuously. 

4. Subject to the exception in Rule 3, the Court shall 
have power to hear all complaints of offences, including 
abduction of married women, or forcible abduction of unmarried 
women, brought by one state or its subjects against another 
8tat9 or its subjects. 

5. The Stat9, in whose limits a orim9 is ayamitted, 
should be held primarily responsible for the arrest of the 
offender, and for the restitution of property 6r the piymsnt 
of such compensation to the complainant as may ba awarded 

by the Court. 



;416 MWA KAHI^A DIRECTORY. 

6. Should an offender be followed iu hot pursuit front 
the State in whose limits an offence has been committed into 
another State, or if he be subsequently discovered or any part) 
of the stolen property be found in another state, the 
reeponibility for the arrest of the offender and the restitution 
of the stolen property is thereby removed from the State 
first held responsible. 

7. In the event of offenders of different states being 
concerned in an offence, the responsibility shall rest with 
each State in proportion to the number of offenders proved 
to belong to it. 

8. Whenever stolen property is identified by the^ 
owner, it must be delivered up to the Court or the State 
to which the owner belongs, and the holder may, i£ ha ba 
a bona fide purchaser, sue the seller before tha Court. 

9. A complainant shall not be entitled to receive com- 
pensation for an offence committed against him, unless he 
gives information within a reasonable time to the authority 
within whose jurisdiction the offence was committed. The 
Court shall decide whether information was given in reason- 
able time. 

10. In cases of cattle stealing a list containing ths 
colour, age and marks of each animal, must accompany fchfr 
complaint; 

Provided that, in the event of a large number of cattle 
being stolen, it shall be sufficient if the list accompanying 
the complaint contain a description of ten of them and the 
description of the remainder be sent in a supplementary list 
as Eoon as possible afterwards. 

11. Directly a complaint is made to a SUte by any 
of its subjects f of an offence having been committed by 
foreigners within its limits, that State shall be bound to take 
the deposition of complainant and to make an investigation 



BOfeDER COURT RULXS. #fp 

on the spot as soon after the occurrence of the offenoe afc 
possible. The case when completed, as far a3 the complainant 
is concerned, must be sent to the Political Agent, in whosfr 
charge the State is». Should no action of the above nature 
be taken by the Darbar within six months of the complaint 
Ijeing preferred, the Court hh^U ordinarily not entertain any 
claim against the State to which the offenders belong op 
account of the offence complained of. 

12. If a person having committed an offense in one 
State abscond to another State and is thsre pointed out by 
the complainant t > the Game i or village authorities thereof, 
the State, in whioh hi is found, shall be b:>un 1 to mike hiria 
over at once to the complaining S:ate or to produce hi n au 
the following C urfc, and in default, bhall be liable to pay 
compensation. 

13. If subjects of one state commit an affray in 
another, and any of the assailants are killed or woun led, 

they or their relatives shall not have any claim to compen- 
sation. 

14. Travellers are bound to empl >y walawi* or 
guards to be supplied by the local authorities, and persons 
who do not take this precaution will not have any claim 
for compensation. 

15. Complainants must attend before the Court in 
-person. If, however, any complainant should be UQibl-a to 
do so from any cause satisfactory to the Courfc, a member 
of his household may be allowed to attend in his place, at 
the discretion of the Court, or the case may be postponed. 

16. A list of claims shall be drawn up annually and 
transmitted by the respectivo Political Agents »ni Super- 
intendents at least 30 days before the day appointed for the 
sitting of the Court. Ca^es which may have occurred 
within 80 days of the assembly of the Court may be heard, 

53 



4tB RBWA KAHTHA DIRECTORY. 

provided that in the first instance, the Chief against wio*9 
state or subjects complaint is brought has had an oppjrtuity 
of inquiring into the case: — otherwise their settlement will 
be postponed till the next Court. 

17. 1 he cases shall ordinarily ba proceeded with 
according to the order anl date in which they are entered 
in the lists of claims. 

18. Two months, notice shall be consider 3d sufficient 
for the states to produce all parties required. 

19. No claim sh^U ba entertained by the Cjurt, 
unless it be preferred by the complainant or the Scaoe to 
which he belongs, within one year from the date on which 
the offence was committed. 

20. When defendants and witnesses named are not 
pre3ent when required, an award may bs given agiinst the 
defendants on the oath of the complainant. 

21. In the case of a complainant not beiug present, 
should th3 defendants plead not guilty, the case may be 
thiown out. 

22. When a State wilfully neglects to produce any 
witnesses or evidence, required by tie ofc ler sid*, i& shall 
ba in the powar of the Court to award full cstnpensation, if 
the witnesses are lequired for the prosecution, and no 
compensation, if they are required for thj detence. 

23. The punishment by any Stata of its owa subject 
cgainst whom conplaint is brought shall not relieve that) 
State from responsibility for paymant of co apaa**tion 
awarded by the Court, but compensation eh ill not be awarded, 
if such Stata has surrendered its abased subjects to the 
complaining State. 

24. The evidence should be r^oried in a laa^ua^e 
which the deposing witness understands, but the rjcori aui 
dec sion should be in English. 



BORDER COURT BULBS. flfi 

25. The following shall be the scale for compensation:— 

Wounding •.. ... ... ... ^ 

Abduction of married women ... •.. I 

Forcibb abduction of unmarried women. ^ 

Unlawfily carrying off, arresting or detaining J 

a person ♦.. ... ... ... J 

Riding Camels 
Baggage do. ... 
She buffalo 
Male buffalo 

Bullock 

v>aiE ... ... *»* ... ••• 

Sheep 

VjOftfJ »m »•. *.. ... ... 

Common pcny... 

In cases of murder the offenders should be surrendered to 
the Court for trial; bat in cases when they ara not produced, 
the responsibility will rest with the S^ate or States 
concerned, which, after reason ibta time allowed, will be 
liable to such fine as the Court may direct, Any portion of 
which may be paid to the relations of th9 deceased anl t\> 
the informer. 

27. Informer's fees shall be limited in amount to 
one-quarter of the amount stolen or compensation olaimsd, 
and will not be paid at all without the proof of the claim 
being a just one. 

*27a. In cases in which the Court is convinced that 
a complaint is wilfully false, it shall, in its discretion, 
award compensation to the State in which the defendant 
resides, proportioned t) the expenses which have b^en 
incurred in connection with the defence. 



Rs. 


I 


to 


300. 




• •• 


Rs. 


80 


• •• 


ft 


50 


• •• 


f> 


3& 


«•• • 


ft 


15 


... 


it 


15 


• •• 


»' 


22 


• •• 


»♦ 


10 


• •• 


»> 


5 


**• 


># 


% 


• •• 




2 

12 



-4*0, BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

28. All compensation awarded must be paid within 
two months from the date of award; if paid by hundi payable 
after 30 days, that hundi must be despatched 30 days before 
the 60 days expire. In cases in which the award raxy be 
of lives-tock, this rule will also apply ; compensated must be 
paid at the rates given ab^vj for all such as may not be 
Landed over within the appointed time. 

' *28a. If the State which is held liable f uls to pay 
the full amount of the award within two months as provided 
above, that amount will t?e advanced by the Agency Treasurer 
under the orders of the Political officar concerned, and the 
whole sum will be chargaable to the state concerned with 
interest at 12 per cent per annum, until repaid. If not 
refunded within one year, the circumstances will be reported 
to the Governor General's Agent in the case of the States 
under Kajputana, and to the Government of Bjinbay in 
the case ot the States in Gujarat. 

29. These rules are to be considered as a general 
guide for the Courts, but they need not be too inflexibly 
applied. When any deviation may prove necessary, the reason 
and object should be recorded in the proceedings. 

30. There shall be no appeal against a decision in which 
the two Political Officers concur, but cases whan they diffar, 
should be rtterred to the Agent Governor General. 

Decisions of local Panchayats in cases referred Co theca 
by the Political Officers are final. 

A. Y. SHORTT, ColoneL 
Political Superintendent, Palanpur. 

W. CARNELL Colcnei. 

Political Superintendent, ShirohL 

c | 

•( Sanctioned by the Government of India by their No. 3637 LB. 
dated l#th November 1914 received under Bombay Government No* 
7225 dated 5th December 1913, Political Department). 



BORDER COURT RULES. 421 

Note— la Government Resolution No. 7594 of 24th 
December 1886 Government have remarked that in the 
Paneh Mahals and Khaadash, whare Bhils abound, Border 
Courts h*ve been ab^ishad, and all cases are disposed of by 
the ordinary tribunals, that in dealing with heinoas offenses 
such as murder, Political Officers should keep the same 
object in view, though it may not be possible immediately 
to attain it. But at any rate the Border Court Rules 
should uot be disregarded. These orders have bean repeated 
ia 1903. 



^fe- 



422 BSfWA KANTHA DI EEC TOBY. 

Chanod Cases* 

No. 140 
Yadi from the Political Agent, Rewa Kantha, to the 
Assistant Political Agent, Rewa Kantha, as under:— 

Suits regarding immoveable proparty &c, in Chanod 
are decided by the Rana of Mandwa according to the 
Resolution of Government, and the Political, Agent, Re^a 
Kantha, is to see that no injustibe is done therein. 

It has been the custom hitherto to submit appeals 
against the R*na's decision to the Sankheda Than*, and a 
special appeal against the Thanadar's order lies to the 
Agency. This procedure shculd cot now be followed. Hence- 
forth, any party dissatisfied with the decision of the Rana 
should, instead of appealing to the Thana, submit his appeal 
together with a copy of the said decision to the Agency. 
This should be made known to the Agency. When the 
Agency calls, on receipt of the said application, for the 
record of the case, the Thanadar should arrange to obtain 
and examine it, and if there is any deficiency, to get it 
completed, and then to submit the same to the Agency 
through you. 

You will prepare English translations o£ the Rana's 
decisions and the Thanadar's opinion and submit them with 
your remarks to this office. Dated 12th Deceember 1881. 



NOTIFICATION No. 258 of 1884. 

The Aasistant Political Agent, Rewa Kantha, notifies 
to the public that in pursuance of the Political Agent's 
Order No. 799/1 rated 10th July 1884 regarding commission 
fee on appeal^ submitted to the Political Agent's Court 
against decisions of the Rana of Mandwa regarding Chanod, 
it is ordered that the following scale of commission fee will 
henceforth ba charged on such appeals :— 



BORDER COURT RULES. 423 

Nature o£ claim. Amount of fee sanctioned, 

1. Claims regarding Haks in which the amount 

cannot be valued ... mmm ... ... 5-0-0 

18. In claims for getting possession of immove- 
able property, for redemption of houses &c, 
mortgaged; for property by right of 
succession; for partition of joint property, 
fees will be charged at the following rates 
according to the value of the property:— 

Claim of any value under Rs. 100 ... 2-0-0 
Do. more than 100 but under Rs. 500 5-0-0 
Do. do. £00 do. 1000 10-0-0 

Do. upwards of Rs. 1000 20-0-0 

3. Claims for possession of house or such im- 

moveable property given on rent ... 5-0-0 

4. On applications bringing to the notice of the 

Court tresspasses on private or public lands. 2-0-0 
Dated 15th July 1884, Godhra. 

(Sd.) Nandshankar Tuuashankar, 

Assistant Political Agent, Rewa Kantha. 



Chiefs absence from his territory to be notified to the Agency. 

No. 6317. 

Political Department. 
Bombay Castle, 16th October 1335. 
RESOLUTION OP GOVERNMENT. 
The Political Agents should bo requested to intimate 
to the Chiefs in their respective Agencies that His 
Excellency the Governor in Council desires that a Caief 
should not leave his State for more than fiftesn days without* 
informing the Political Agant of his address, so that the 
Political Aga'it may be able to communicite with him, if 
he considers that the arraugemants made for the management 
of the State during his absence are satisfactory; or th*t tjt 
*ny other reason the Chiefs return is necessary. 



424 BKWA KAMTHA DIBBCTOBT. 

Chiefs— Correspondence with. 

No. 6363 to 6372 of 1E69. 
To, 

The Princes and Chiefs of Rewa Kantha. 

After compliments — All States of Rewa Kautha, who 
have occasion to correspond with the Agency, are requested 
to see that in all letters written to the Agency the last lino 
should contain the name of the clerk writing the letter and 
the countersignature of the Karbhari. Letters tot complying 
with the above and simply having the seal or other token 
of the State will not be received in the Agency, and will 
be sent back. Therefore arrangements should be made to 
act according to these instructions in future. 

Dated 30th November 1369. 



Chiefs— 'to correspond zvith .Government throvyh their 
Officers. 

No. 2897 of 1874. 

Political Department, 

Bombay Castle, 26th May 1874. 

Resolution of Government. 

His Excellency the Governor in 
^^i^holSISte Council directs that the attention of 
^S^u^nST the Political Agents and other officers 
arLS^tlSha koldi *g appointments of a similar 
V f5i 1 w ^ ^ ^v character be called to the circular 

•* 2. The Government should be ' 

addressed through its .own letter addressed to them on the 8th 

officers and if at any time ' " ' . . . 

Native Oiiefs are dif satisfied June 1859, respecting communications 

with those officers, the Chiefs . , ~ f - T . 

shouid^write in their own names , addressed, to (Government by Native 

lfci<! sencfthier representations to ' 'm •' c _j ' 1 •' 1 '• li- i_ j • *v 

Covemment direct/: -, Qhiets, and which is republished in the 

margin. 



tmom and s&bir sohs. * H$- 

2. Any Native Chief who may ad6pt the course 

pointed out in the 2nd paragraph of that letter should, at 

the time of addressing Government, furnish the officer 

appealed against with a duplicate of his letter sigaeJ by 

himself. 

C. GONNE, 
Secretary to Government. 



Chiefs- BfetV apparents, when representing them, to be accorded 
lower status and honours. 

No. 1162-1166 of 1869. 
To, 

The Principal Chiefs of Rewa Kantha. 

I have the honour to state that I hnvi received Bsnabay 
Government Resolution No. 769 dated 8fch March 1869 in 
which the following instructions have been given. 

In the opinion ot the Viceroy and Governor General 
in Council, an heir apparent should, when acting as the 
representative o£ his father, be allowel to sib in the row 
behind ruling Chiefs of his class and be given a guard of 
honour, smaller in strength. But such honours are strictly 
limited to the occasions when the Ruling Chief is himself 
finable to attend and obtains permission to depute the heir* 
apparent in his place. Tnis mirk of respect should not be 
conceded as of right, when the Ruling Cbief excuses his own 
attendance on insufficient grounds or when the heir-apparenfc 
is not formally deputed to pay the visit in the place of the 
Chief 

Dated 17th March 1869. 

Note. — Under Government Resolution .No/ 141 of 15th 
January 1869 the heir-apparent of a first class chief, attend- 
ing to represent his father in Darbar, receives a salute tw* 
guns less than his father and his e:cort is smaller. 
54 



4|6 BBWA KANTHA DIRECTOR?* 

CbltfSf-sons of-should be properly educated. 
( Translation from Gujarati. ) 

Circulars Nos. 3215 24 of 1873. 
From, 

The Political Agent, Rewa Kantha. 
To, 

All Chiefs and Talukdars of Rewa Kantha. 

I have the honour to inform you that the following 
Notification No, 39, dated 19th August 1873, has been 
published on page 200 of the Kathiawar Agency Gazette 
dated 21st August 1873: — 

" Taukdars who cannot read or write are nob fib to 
4t perform the functions of a Judge or Magistrate. The Acting 
€i Political Agent therefore notifies, with the approval and 
" sanction of Government, that in future, as a rule, jurisdiction 
i€ will not be granted to any Talukdar who is not fairly 
"educated in his own tongue. Talukdars of one or two 
" villages who have not the means of sending their sons to 
" the Rajkumar College, are advised to send them to the 
€€ nearest school." 

The above order hass been passed with regard to the 
Talukdars of the Kathiawar Agency. Government may 
perhaps apply that Resolution to Rewa Kantha also. All 
are therefore advised beforehand to try their beat to make 
euch arrangements that their sons may be well educated and 
become smart, so that there may njt remain the least chanoe 
of any danger to their rights in future. And it is obvious 
ttial by educating their Kumars and making them efficient 
in this way, no barm will be done. Dated 29th August 
J 87 3, Camp Baroda. 



CHIEFS AND THEIR SONS. 

Chiefs— minors- to be sent to the Rajkumar College and after 
eompletion of education, to be entrusted with administeration 
of their states. 

{Republished from the Kathiawar Directory.) 
No. 3415. 

Political Department* 
Bombay Castle, 18th June 1874. 
Letter from the Acting Director of Public Instruction , No* 
899, dated 19th May 1874, submitting, with his remarks, 
the annual report from Mr. MacNaughten, on the Rajkumar 
Cdlegefor 1873-74. 

RESOLUTION. 



3- The Rajkumar College should be considered tha 
regular place of education for the C liefs of the whole of 
Gujarat, and for such of their Bhayats as can afford it. And 
His Excellency in Council is pleased to direct that, unless 
there is in any case special reason to the contrary, minor 
chiefs who are wards of Government should be sent to the 
College at the age of 9 years. There c*n* be no doubt 
that the training that the boys will thus receive will be a 
real berefit not only to themselves, but to the States they 
will afterwards be called upon to administer. Ai d th* 
Political Officers should use their beit inflaenca to the s m> 
end with those Chiefs who have sons, so that the b>ys rob 
under the immediate control of Government may also baf 
sent about the same age, 

4. It is unfortunately the custom , at present for 
young chiefs to marry at an early age, but a , boy's marriage 
need not interfere with his course of study, and His 
Excellency in Council would l*y it down as a general rule 
that the College education should be continued to the agfr' 



4S$~y BBWA KAHTHA DIKICTORY*. 

of IS, After leaving College it would b9 well that the 
young Chiefs should see something of the other parts of 
India ; and a year spent in travelling wo lid ba in every way 
desirable towards completing their education. 21 has been 
fixed by Government as the ordinary age of political 
majority, when the estate may be handed over to the 
management of a young Chief. 

O. GONNE, 
Secretary to Government. 



Letter from the Political Agent in Kathiawar, No. 105, dated 
lith March 1875 submitting, for consideration, a letter 
from the Ministers of the four First Class States, regarding 
succession of minor Chiefs of the Kathiiwar Province to 
the Gadi on attaining majority. Expressing opinion that 
when a young Chief has attained such an age and 
acguirements as fit him to begin the administration of his 
State, the full powers of the State should be made ovzr 
to be administered by him, either jointly with a British 
Officer or with such assistance and supervision as may 
seem needful, all restrictions and supervision being with* 
drawn, when twenty- one years are completed. 

Resolution. — In their Resolution No. 3415 cf 18th 
June 1874 on the Annual Heporr. of the Principal of th& 
Rajkuinar College, the Government announced that minor 
Chiefs under their guardianship should, as a rule, be senfc to 
the College at the age of 9, ani remaiu there till 18, after 
which it would be very desirable to complete their education 
by a year of travel, it was addeu " twenty-one has beea 
fixed by Government as the ordinary age of political majority, 
when the Estate may be handed over to the manage menb 
of the young Ohief.'' 

2. The interesting conference which was held on this 
•object on the occasion of His Excellency the Governor 



CHIBFS AND THEIB MVfl, , , 4^ 

visitng R*jkot in Janaary last, and the letter of the lOtfch 

March which has been addressed to the Political Agent by 
the representatives of the four principal States in Kathiawar, 
have satisfied Government that a tuller statement of their 
views is desirable. 

3. lb has been urged that "it is rather too long to 
wait til] a Chief attains 21 years before assuming the 
management of his State." Bat in fixing this age for the 
attainment of political majority the Government had in view 
the assumption by the Chief of his full authority. It was 
not intended to debar a well educated Chief from receiving 
his authority at the age of nineteen in association with, or 
under the guidance of, an experienced officer of Government, 
but on the contrary Gjvemmant think it most desirable 
that he should in this way be inducted into the difficult! 
duties of the position which he is afterwards to fill on hia 
sole responsibility. 

4. It appears, also, from the wording of the passage 

above-quoted, to be feared that the Government contemplate 

the possibility of retaining the administration of a State in 

their own hands even after the Chief should have attained 

the age of twenty-one years. Nothing, however, could have 

been farther from the intention of Government, bacause, a 

connection with the Rajkumar Collega, they were considering 

the case of young Chiefs who, they are confident, will have 

received the education and moral training waich is bacoming 

now so indhpeasab e to their high position. Tfte great* 

interest takeu by Government in the Rijfcumar College 

antes from a sincere desiro to perpecuate unimpaired the 

locai Government of ohe Chiefs, and the appreheniions that* 

hava been expressed could apply ony to those States, the 

future Chiei's oi which are being brought up ao their own 

houses in ignorance ani under iafluenc^ likely to prove most* 

prejudicial to their future career. ' 

G. GONNE, 

Secretary to Government* 



4& 



BWWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



Chiefs— Visits of Chiefs or their Agents to members of 
Government* 

No. 3063, 

Political Department 
Bombay Castle, 29th May 1886. 
* * * # 

2. His Excellency the Governor and the other members 
of Government will always be happy to receive and return 
friendly visits from the Chiefs, and to discuss with them or 
their Agents any matters affecting the position and prosperity 
of the Chiefs themselves, their families and their States. Bub 
to this general rule there are two exceptions, in the propriety 
of which His Excellency in Council feels sure that the Chiefs 
will readily acquiesce. 

The first exception relates to judicial or quasi -judicial 
matters, i. e. to matters in dispute between a Chief and 
another person, in which Government is called upon to pro- 
nounce a decision. In such cases Government occupies a 
judicial position, and must, as regards the parties interested, 
exercise the cautious reserve observed by a Judge in his 
relations towards the litigants in his Court. Provision has 
been made by the Rules which took effect on the 1st of 
January 1884> for all arguments in appeal being heard and 
noted by the Political Agent for the information of the 
Governor in Council. It is therefore nob necessary for the 
Chiefs or their Agents to make representations in such 
matters to the members of the Government, nor would it 
be becoming to do so in the absence of the other party. 

The second exception relates to claims or representations 
on which the Chiefs desire to obtain the formal order or 
decision of Government. As observed by the Government 
of India, the decisions of Government are given upon the 
record only. The record is nob complete until the opinion 



CHIEFS AND THEIR REPRESENTATIVES, . j^I 

of the Political Agent has been recorded, and antil that 
opinion has been oomaaunicatei to Government, the members 
of Government are nob generally in a position to discuss 
the matter at issue with the Caief or his Agent, even if 
they were willing (which they are not*, to ignore the 
Political A^ent, who is the responsible adviser of Govern- 
ment in all matters affecting the Kathiawar Chiefs. It is 
necessay therefore that all such claims and repreeentabiona 
should be made in writing, and through the Political Agent, 
and until this has been doue, the members of Govern neat 
must ordinarily decline to discuss such matters parsonally 
with the Chiefs or their Agents. 

3. The above was the intention of the Resolution 
complained of; and the Governor in Council regrets that it 
should .have given ike to the misconception that the 
members of Government desired in any way to curtail the 
friendly intercourse which they have hitherto enjoyed with 
Chiefs of Kathiawar. 

4. The Political Agent, Kathiawar, should communicate 
this Resolution to the Cuiefs by letter and also publish it in 
ih9 Kathiawar Agency Gazette. 

5. The otb r Political Agents should cofnaauni§ata 
the purport of para 2 of this Resolution to the Gaiefs under 
their charge in explanation of Government Resolution No. 
It 38 dated 24th March 1885. 

W. WEDDERBURN, 

Ag. Chief Secretary to Government* 

Note; — 

Purport of para 2 of the above Resolution was coa* 
veyed to the Chiefs of Rewa Kantha by the Political Agent 
in No. 862 369 dated 16th June 1886. 



43 J BKWA KANTHA B1RKCT0KY. 

Chiefs— Sanction to institute suits against— 

Bombay Castle, 13th May 1896. 

No. 3194— The following Notification by the Govern- 
ment of India in tbe Foreign Department is published for 
general information: — 

Simla, the 18th May 1896. 

No. 1503-1 — Under Section *433, sub-section (4)ofthd 
Code cf Civil Procedure and in supercession of the notification 
of the Government of India in the Foreign Department No. 
2181-1 dated the 2nd July 1880, the Governor General in 
, Council is pleased to authorize the Government of Bombay 
and any of the Secretaries to that Government to exercise with 
respect to the Chiefs below 1 specified by their titular names 
the functions assigned by the .^sub-sections (1), (2) and (3) 
of the said Section to the Governor-General in Council and 
the Secretary to the Government of India respectively. 

* See now Section 86, subsectien (4) o£ the Code of Civil Proce- 
dure 1908. 

t All JurisdictionaLCbiefs 5n tbe political control o£ the Bombay 
Government. 




CIVIL COURTS RULES. 4 3 & 

, Civil & Criminal Procedure Codes, prescribed for guidance 

. 0/ Agency CouHs.„ 

f NOTIFICATION. 

Political Department, 
Bombay Castle, 4th April 1919* 
No. 2098. In exercise of the power delegated under 
the Indian (Fcre'gn jurisdiction) Order in Council. 1903, by 
the Governor General in Council in the Notification of the 
Government of India, in the Foreign Department, No. 2859 
1 A, dated the 19th June 1903, and of all othe^ powars 
enabling him in this behalf, the Governor in Co noil is 
pleased to direct that the Courts of Revva Kantha Agency 
shall be guided generally in their procedure by the following 
provisions, mutatis mutandis, and so far as they are applicable, 
(a; The provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure 
and of Ihe Code of Civil Procedure tor the time 
being in force in British India, and 

(b) The provisions of all rules from time to tim3 made 
by the High Court of Bombay under part X cf tha 
Code of Civil Procedure, 1938, or any corresponding 
enactment for the time being in force. 



Civil Courts Rules* 

Bombay Castle, 1st July 1915. 

No. 3817-A. — In exercise of the powers and jurisdiction 

delegated by the Government of India, Foreign Dipartment, 

Notification No. 2859 LA. , dated the 19bh Jane 1903, and 

of all other powers enabling him in this behalf, the Governor 

in Council is pleased, in supersession cf all previous rule3 oa 

the subject, to prescribe, with effect from 1st August 1915, 

the following revised rules £or defining; the «.oivil jurisiietioa 

(original and appellate) to be exercised by tbe CourtJ3 of 

the Rewa Kantha Political Agency for regulating the right 

55 ; ' ' -■'•■■ 



434 BBWA KAMTHA DIBBCTOfcT. 

of appeal, and the payment of Court-fees by parties and for 
4nsaring punctuality in the discharge of judicial business. 
Nothing herein contained shall be deemed applicable to 
political suits, save as may be expressly so ordered by the 
Governor in Council :— 

1. The Civil Courts of the Rewa Kantba Agency 
-shall be classed as — 

(a) Subordinate Courts. 

(b) Courts of the Assistants to the Political Agent. 

(c) Political Agent's Court. 

2. The Subordinate Courts are specified in Appendix 
A. Their jurisdiet on shall be limited to civil suits of all 
descriptions of the values specified therein. 

3. The Court3 of tha Assistants to the Political 
Agent are specified in Appendix B. Their original jurisdic- 
tion shall at present be limited to civil suits of all descriptions 
of the values specified therein, or such values as the 
Political Agent shall hereafter, with the sanction of 
Government, from time to time direct. Tdey fchall also 
possess an appellate jurisdiction in suite tried by the 
Subordinate Courts upto the limits specified in the said 
appendix. The charges o£ the Courts may be altered under 
the orders of the Political Agent. 

4. If the Assistants to the Politic*! Agent coasidsr 
that a suit which has been filed as a political suit should be 
heard as a civil suit, or the Assistant Political Agent, 
Deputy Assistant Politic d Agent or a Thaniar considers 
tnat a suit which has been filed as a civil suit should ba 
heard as a political suit, they should rater the case to the 
Political Agant for orders. Any party to a suit may apply 
to the Political Agent for an order that a political suit may 
be heard as a civil suit or vice versa. 

5. Any proceedings pending in any civil Court of tho 
Agency in respect of any debt or Lability of a Chief or 



CIVIL COURTS RULES. 435- 

Talukdar, whose Estate is attached by the Political Agent 
on account of its being encumbered, shall, on the publication 
of the order of attachment, be stayed; and the operation of 
all processes, executions and attachments then in force fo*\ 
or in respect of, such debts and li abilities shall be suspended, 
and so long as such attachment continues, no fresh proceed- 
ings, processes, executions or attachments shall be instituted 
in or issued by any such Court in respect of such debts and 
liabilities. 

6. No suit for money against the proprietor of any 
Estate assessed for Government or Gaekwar tribute or 
holding the position of a Chief or Talukdar shall be entertained 
without the formal permission of the Political Agent, and 
no decree of an Agency Civil Court in a money suit ngainst 
the proprietor, of such an estate shall have any fierce after 
the death of such landed proprietor, unless the debt was 
incurred with the sanction of the Political Agent 

7. An appesl whether on a matter of law or fact 
shall lie from the decree of any of the Subordinate Courts 
mentioned in Appendix A to such of the Courts of the 
Assistants to the Political Agent as the Political Agent may 
from time to time direct. 

8. If the suit be of a nature cognizable in Courts of 
Small Causes, and of a value nob exceeding Rs. 500, the 
decision in appeal of the Court of the Assistant to the 
Political Agent shall be final. 

9. In all suits relating to moveable property but not 
falling under Rule 8 and of a value not exceeding Rs. 1,000, 
if the Court cf the Assistant to the Political Agent 
confirms the decree of the Subordinate Court, its deoision 
shall be foil. 

10. In all suits in which the Court of the Assistant 
to the Political Agenb reverses or modifies the decreaoftho 
Subordinate Court and in all suits relating to moveable 



436 BEWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY, 

property of a value exceeding Rs. 1,000 and in all suits 
relating to immoveable property or to any interest therein, 
a second appeal .on a matter of law shall lie to the Court 
of the Political Agent. 

11. An appeal whether on a matter of law or fact 
shall lie from the origin ^\ decree of a Court of an Assistant 
to the Political Agent to the Court of the Political Agent. 



V ? i 



12. If the suit be of the nature cognizable in Courts 
of Small Causes and of a v&lue not exceeding Rs. 1 ,009, 
the decision in appeal of the Court of the Political Agent) 
shall be final. 

13. In all suits relating to movaable property but not 
falling under Rula 12 and of a value not exceeding Rs. 
3,066, if the Court of the Political Agent confirms the 
decree of the Court of the Assistant to the Political Agent, 
its^cUcision shall be final. 

14 In all such suits in whioti the Court of the 
Political Agent reverses or modifies the decree of the Court 
of the Assistant to che Political Ageno, and in all suits 
relating t> moveable property of a valuj exc3ediag Rs. 
3,000, and in all suits relating to ium>veable property or 
any interest? therein, a second appeal on a nutter of Uw saill 
lie to the Governor in Council. 

15. All appeals preferred unior Rale 14 to th? 
Governor in Council shall be presentei to t^e Polioietl Ag3ac 
in triplicate, and shall b3 accompaniii by authenticate I 
copies of the judgment * and depress of the lower Courts, an I 
by certified trausla&iona of any documents on wrnaii the suit 
has been brought, or which may be relied on by the appallant, 
within 90 day & from the date of the decree in respect of 
of which the appeal is preferred, exclusive of the time taken 
up m obtaining copies, in accordance with the rules laid 
down in Government Resolution No. 7233, dibed th* 1st* 



CIVIL COURTS RULES. 437 

October 1900. In forwarding saoh appeals the Political 
Agent shall certify whether they ara barred by limitation 
or not. 

16. The Political Agent shall not call upon the 
respondent to submit a rejoindar (|o the appeal, until it has 
been asked for by Government. If Government call for a 
rejoinder, the Political Agent shall cause one copy of the 
special appeal to be «erved oa the respondent with a notice 
requiring him to submit in duplicate to the Political Agent 
any reply he may wish to make within 30 days from the 
service of such notice, provided that such time may be 
extended to 90 days at the discretion of the Political Agent. 

17. The Political Agent is empowered to call for 
proceedings in nonappealable cases of the Courts of his 
Assistants and the Subordinate Courts far revision and 
inspection, and to prescribe form3 of returns of civil work 
fcr each class of Court, and when such returns are to be 
rendered. 

18. Returns of the Assistants shall be examined by 
the Political Agent, and those of Subordinate Courts by 
the Assistants to the Political Agent, who shall submit 
them with their remarks to the Political Agent for disposal. 

19. In suits in the Courts of first instance and in the 
Appellate Courts of the Agency, fees will be levied as per 
annexed schedule (Appendix C)- 

20. No appeal to the Governor in Council will be 
received without payment of the fee prescribed b^low, unless 
the appellant shall have baen authorised by th3 Pjlitical 
Agent to appeal in forma pauperis. 

Where the value of the civil suit dj>es nit ex^eai R-l 
25 the fee on the appeal shall be Ks. 2. } 

Where it exceeds Rs. 2 but not Rs. 50, tha fee on tha 
appeal shall be Rs. 4. 



436 



RBWA KANTHA DIB1CT0RT. 



Where it exceeds (Re. 50 but not Rs. 100, the fee on 
the appeal shall be Rs. 8. 

Where it exceeds Rs. 100 bat nob Rs. 150, the fee on 
the appeal shall be Bs. 12. 

Where it exceeds Rs. 150 but not Rs. 200, the fee on 
the appeal shall be Rs. 16 and so on, being at the rate of 
a fee of Rs. 4 for every R?. 50 or frsnction of Rs. 50 ofc 
value claimed up to the amcunt of Rs. 10,000. 

In suits of a value exceeding Rs. 10,000, the fee on 
the appeal shall be calculated at the rate of eight per cent 
on the value, up to the sum of Rs. 10,000, and of eight* 
per cent, on each additional Rs. 100 or fraction of Rs. 10$ 
above the sum. 



APPENDIX A. 

List of Subordinate Courts of the Reiva Kantha Agencj/ 
referred to in Rule 2. 



No. 


Name of Conrt. 


Limit of 
jurisdiction. 


1 

2 
3 


Thandar of Wadia 

„ Panda 

„ Jambughoda* ... 


3,000 
1,000 
1,000 



NoTE:-The Jambughoda State has now been handed over t:> the 
Chief who has been invest 3d with the powers of a 5th Class State. 



CIVIL COURTS BULKS. 439 

APPENDIX B. 

List of Courts of the Assistants to the Political Agent % 
referred to in Rule 3. 



Ko. 



Name of Court. 



Limit of 
original 
jurisdiction. 



Limit of 

Appellate 

jurisdiction* 



Assistant Political Agent in 
charge Jambughoda* 

Deputy Assistant Political Agent 
in charge Mewas. 



1 
I 
y No limit. 

I 

J 



No limit. 



*Note. — The jurisdiction of the Assistant Political 
Agent is limited to the area comprised in the Jambughoda 
State. That of the District Depaty Assistant Political 
Agent is limited to the Thana Circles of Sankheda and 
Pandu Mewas. 



APPENDIX C. 

The fees on plaints, petitions of appeal, and applications 
presented to the Civil Courts o£ the Rewa Kantha Agency 
will be computed and levied in accordance with the following 
-rales and regulations: — 

(i) The amount of fee payable in the suits next 
hereinafter mentioned shall be computed as follows :— 

[i) in suite for money ( including suits for 
damages or compensation, or arrears of maintenance, 
or arrears of annuities or of other > sums psyaote 
periodically ) according to the amount claimed. 

(ii) in suits for maintenance and annuities or 
other sums payable periodically, according to thfe 



440 BEWA KAtfTHA DIRECTORY. 



% 



value of the subjectnoatter of the suit, and such 
value shall be deem ad to be ten time3 the amount 
claimed to be payable for one year. 

{Hi) In suits for moveable property other than 
money, where the subject matter has a market 
value, according to such value at the date of 
presenting the plaint ; 

(iv) In suits— 

(a) for moveable property where the 
subject matter has no market value, as for 
instance, in the case of documents relating to- 
title ; 

(b) to enforc3 the right to share in any 
property on the ground that it is joint family 
property, 

(c) to obtain an injunction ; 

(d) for a right to some benefit (not herein 
otherwise provided for) to arise out of land; and 

(e) for accounts, 

according to the amaunb ab which the relief 
sought is valued in the plaint or memorandum 
of appeal. 

(v) In suits for the possession of land, houses 
and garden according to the value of the subject 
matter, and such value shall be deemed to be, 

(a) where the subject-matter is land, ten 
times the gross produce arising from the hnd 
during the year next before the date of 
presenting the plaint. The rate of one rupee 
per bigha or one half part of an acre may be 
c6nsidered to ba the average annual gross pro- 
duce, unless the Court considers that the rate 
is obviously insufficient. 



- CIVIL COUBTf RULES. SfJ "* 

(b) where the subject-matter - is a house 
cr. garden, according to market value of the 
house or garden. 

(vi). In suits for vero or manu mapu or for the 
interest of an assignee of land revenue or haks 
arising cut of the lacd, ten times the gross produce, 

(vii). In suits to set aside an attachment of 
land or of an interest in land or revenue, according 
to the amount for which the land or interest 
was attached, provided that where such atmunt 
exceeds the vali e of the land or interest, the amount 
o£ fee shall be computed as if the suit were for th* 
possession of such lanl or interest. 

(viii). In suits against a mortgagee for the 
recovery of the land mortgaged and in suits by a 
mortgagee to foreclose the mortgage, according to the 
principal money expressed to be secured by the 
instrument of mortgage. 

(2). If the Court sees reason to think that the 
annual gross produce or the market value of any land, 
house or girden, has been wrongly estimated, the Court 
may, for the purpose of computing the fee payable, issue 
a commission to any proper person directing him to make 
euch local or other investigation as may be necessary, and 
to repot therecn to the Court. 

(3). If, in the result of any such investigation, the 
Court finds that the gross produce or market value has 
been wrongfully estimated, the Court, if the estimation has 
been excessive, may in its discretion, refund the excess 
paid as such fee. 

But if the estimation has been insufficient, the Court 
shall require the plaintiff to pay bo much additional fee as 
Ijrould have been payable, had the estimation been right, 
56 



442 BEWA KAKTHA DIRKCTOEY, 

la such case the suit shall be stayed, until the additional 
fee is paid. If it is not paid within such time as the Court 
shall fix, the suit shall be dismissed. 

(4). In suits tor mesne profits, or for immoveable 
property and mesne profits, or for an account, if the profits 
or amount decreed are in excess of the profits claimed or 
the amount at which the plaintiff valued the relief sought, 
the decree shall not be executed, until the difference betwean 
tie fee actually p id, and the proper fee (payable if the suit 
had comprised tbe whole of the profit or amount so decreed; 
shall have been paid to the Court. 

(5). Where the amount of mesne profits is left to be 
ascertained in the course of the execution of decree, if the 
profits so ascertained exceed the profits claimed, the further 
execution of tbe decree shall be stayed, until the difference 
between the fee actually paid and the fee which would have 
been payable (had the suit comprised the whole of the profits 
€0 ascertained) is paid. If the additional fee is not paid 
within such time as the Court shall fix, the suit shall be 
dismissed. 

(6). Every question relating to valuation, for the 
purpose of determining the amount of any fee chargeable 
under these rules on a plaint or memorandum of appeal, shall 
be decided by the Court in which such plaint or memorandum, 
as the case may be, is filed, and such decision shall be final 
as between the parties to the suit. 

But whenever any such suit comes before a Cjurt of 
Appeal, reference or revision, if such Court considers that 
the said question has been wrongly decided to the loss of 
the Mewas Administration Fund, it may require the party 
by whom such fee has been paid to pay so much addition tl 
fee as would have bee i payable, had the question beeu 
rightly decided, and the provisions of Rule (3; shall apply. 

(7). If an appeal or plaint which has been rej acted 
by the lower Court is ordered to be received, or if a suit 



CIVIL C0UBT8 BULBS. 44& 

is remanded in appeal for a second decision by the lower 
Court, which had thrown it oat on a preliminary point, tho 
Appellate Court shall grant to the appellant a certificate 
authorising him to receive back the full amount of fee paid 
on the memorandum of appeal. 

Provided that if in the case of a remand on appeal 
the order of remand shall not cover the whole of the subject 
matter of the suit, the certificate so granted shall not 
authorise the appellant to receive back more than so much 
fee as would have been or'ginally payable on the part or 
parts of such subject-matter in respect whereof the suit has 
been remanded. 

(8). Where an application for a review of judgment is 
admitted, and where on the re-hearing the Court reverses or 
modifies its former decisions on the ground of mistake in law 
or fact, the applicant shall be entitled to a certificate from 
the Court authorising him to receive back the fee paid on 
the application. 

But nothing in this section should entitle the applicant 
to such certificate, where the reversal or modification is due r 
wholly or in part, to fresh evidence which might have been 
produoed at the original hearing. 

(9 s . When any appeal is presented to a Civil Court, 
not against the whole of a decision but only against so much 
thereof as relates to a portion of the subject matter of the 
suit, and on the hearing of such appeal the respondent takes 
an objection to any part of the said decision other than the 
part appealed against, the Court shall not hear such objection 
until the respondent shall have paid tbe additional fee which 
would have been payable, had tlbe appeal comprised the part 
of the decision so objected to. 

(10). Claims for inheritance, maintenance from or 
partition of Estates which have not hitherto supported the 
jurisdictory rights of a Ruling Chief may, unless the Political 
Agent thinks fit to withdraw them, be heard as civil suits, 



444 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

(11). No document of any of the kinds specified in the 
annexed schedule as chargeable with a fee shall be filed, 
exhibited or recorded in any of the Courts of the Rewa Kantha 
Agency, or shall be received or furnished by any Politic tl 
Officer, unless in respect of such document there ba paid a 
fee of an amount not less than that indicated in the said 
ecfaedule as the proper fee for such documont. 

(12). All fees referred to in the annexed schedule shall 
be collected by Court-fee stamps current in the RewaK^nfcha 
Agency. 

(13\ No document requiring a stamp under the 
annexed schedule shall be filed or acted upon in any proceeding 
in any of the Rewa Kantha Agency Courts, until the stamp 
has been cancelled. Such officer as the Court or the head 
of the office may from time to time appoint shall, on 
receiving any such document, forthwith effect such cancella- 
tion by punching out the figure head so as to leave the 
amount designated on the stamp untouched, and tha part 
removed by punching shall be burnt or otherwise destroyed. 




SCHEDULE OF COTJB'jyFBBB. 

Schedule of Court-fees. 



445 



dumber. 



Ad valorem fees. 



Proper fee. 



1. Plain fc or 
memorandum 
Of appeal (not 
otherwise pro- 
vided for) pre-*{ 
sented to 
any Civil 
Court. 



When the amount or 
value of subject- 
matter in dispute 
does not exceed five 
rupees. 

When such amount 
or value exceeds 
five rupees, for every 
fivQ rupees or part? 
thereof in excess of 
five rupees up to 
one hundred rupees. 

When such amount 
or value exceeds 
one hundred rupees^ 
for every tea rupees 
or part thereof in 
excess of one hun- 
dred rupees up to 
one thousand rupees. 

When such amount 
or value exceeds 
one thousand rupees, 
for every hundred 
rupees or part there* 
ot in excess of one 
thousand rupees up 
to five tnousaud 
rupees. 

When such amount 
or value exceeds fiva 
thousand rupees, for 
every two hundred 
and fitty r&pees or 
part thereof in ex- 
cess of five thousand 



Six annas. 



Do. 



Twelve annas. 



Five rupees. 



Tea rup?e3. 



446 



BBWA KAHTHA DIBHCTORY* 



Number. 



Ad valorem fees. 



Proper fee. 



rupees up to ten 
thousand rupees- 

When such amount 
or value exceeds ten 
thousand rupees, for 
every five hundred 
rupees or part there 
of in excess of ten 
thousand rupees up 
to twenty thousand 
rupees. 

When such amount 
or value exceeds 
twenty thousand 
rupees for every 

One thousand rupees 
or part thereof in 
excess of twenty 
thousand rupees up 
to thirty thousand 
rupees. 

When such amount 
or value exceeds 
thirty thousand 

rupees, for every two 
thousand rupees or 
part thereof in ex- 
cess of thirty thou- 
sand rupees upto 
fifty thousand Rs. 

When such amount 
or value exceeds 
fifty thousand Rs., 
for every five thou- 
sand Rs, or part 
thereof in excess 
of fifty thousand 
rupees. 

Provided that the 



Fifteen rupees. 



Twenty rupees. 



Do. 



Twenty-five rupees* 



SCHEDULE OF C0UBT-FEE3* 



«r 



Number, 



Ad valorem fees. 



Proper fee. 



2 # Plaint or me- 
morandum of 
appeal in a suit 
by a person dis- 
possessed of im- 
moveable pro- 
perty otherwise 
than by due 
course of law, 
where the suit 
is brought with- 
in six months 
from disposses- 
sion and is for 
recovery of pos- 
session only 
without refer- 
ence cf title. 

3. Application 
for review ot 
judgment, if pre- 
sented on or 
afcer the nine- 
tieth day from 
the date of decree 

4, Application for 
review of judg- 
ment if present- 
ed before the 
ninetieth day 
from the date 
of decree. 



maximum fee levi- 
able on a plaint or 
memorandum of ap- 
peal shall be three 
thousand rupees. 



A fee of one«half the 
amount prescribed ia 
the foregoing scale. 



The fees leviable 
on the plaint or 
memorandum of 
of appeal* 



One-half of the fee 
leviaole on th4 plaint 
or memorandum of 
appeal. 



448 



BEWA EANTHA BIBECTOBY. 



Number. 



Ad valorem fees. 



Proper fee. 



5. Copy of trans- 
lation of a judg- 
ment, order or 
decree or other 
paper in a suit 
( or from the 
records of the 
Agency officers), 



(Succession 
certificate 



One rupee as attestation 
fee, together with two 
annas per one hundred 
words or fraction of 
one hundred words of 
English and one anna 
per one hundred word3 
or fraction of one 

hundred words of 
Gujarati, as compar- 
ing fee, and rupeee two 
as searching fee for 
each year of which 
the Daftar is search- 
ed, if the number, 
date and other nece- 
ssary particulars be 
not accurately speci- 
fied in the application. 

Two per cent on amount 
or value of any debt 
or security specified 
in the certificate and 
three per cent on the 
amount or value of 
any debt or security 
to which the certifi- 
cate is extended. 

Note.-(l) The amount 
of a debt is the 

amount including in- 
terest on the day on 
which the inclusion 
of the debt in the 
certificate is applied 
for, so far as su ch 
amount can be as- 
certained; (2) whe- 
ther or not any 
power with respect 



SCHEDULE OF COURT-FEES. 



449 



Number, 



Ad valorem fees. 



Proper fee. 



7. Certi6cate of 
heirship 




to a secun^y speci- 
fied in a certificate 
has been conferred, 
and wr ere euch a 
power has been con- 
ferred, and where 
such a power has 
been conferred whe* 
ther the pow r is for 
the receiving of in cr- 
est or dividend on, 
or fcr the negotal n 
or transfer of the se- 
curity or fir both 
purposes the valuu of 
the security is it* 
market value on the 
cay on which the in- 
clusion ot the security 
in the certificate it 
applied for so tar as 
etch value onn be 
ascertained. 
(1) As regards debts 
and Sbturities the 
same fee as would be 
payable in respect of 
succession certif c*te 
or in respect ut an 
extension of &ucu a 
ceitilicate as the 
case may be; aud 

(2y a^ regards other 
pioperty in respecb 
of which the eerwii- 
cate is granted, two 
per cent on suiauoh 
of the am uut or 
value 'ct such pro- 
pti ty as exceeds one 
u ousand rup'e-s. 



5T 



450 



BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



Table of rates of ad valorem fees leviable on the institution of suits. 



"** 








•4^ 






5 9 n 








a ® n 






ft*5 ^ 








« •-—I <£> 






5? ^ -£ 








§ *"* -*-' 






$ g T $ 
rg.2 "S 3 


But does 






i*sl-s 


But does 




not 


Proper fee. 


.ssil 


not 


Proper fee. 


exceed. 






03 Q) n 


exceed. 


















*£3 £ 3 








,G £ 3 






fe 








|5- 






Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. a. 


P- 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. a. p* 


• • • 


5 


6 





2a0 


■2J0 


21 12 


5 


10 


12 





290 


300 


22 8 


10 


15 


1 2 





300 


310 


23 4 


15 


20 


1 8 





310 


320 


24 


•20 


25 


1 14 





320 


330 


24 12 


25 


30 


2 4 





3;-,0 


340 


25 8 


30 


35 


2 10 





340 


350 


26 4 


35 


40 


3 





350 


360 


27 


40 


45 


3 6 





3G0 


370 


27 12 


45 


50 


3 12 





3 


380 


28 8 


50 


55 


4 2 





:80 


390 


29 4 


55 


60 


4 8 





390 


400 


i'O 


60 


65 


4 14 





400 


410 


30 12 


65 


70 


5 4 





410 


420 


31 8 


70 


75 


5 10 





420 


430 


32 4 


75 


.80 


6 





430 


440 


33 


80 


85 


6 6 





440 


450 


33 12 


!-5 


90 


6 12 





450 


460 


34 8 


90 


95 


7 2 





460 


470 


35 4 


9o 


100 


7 8 





4.0 


480 


36 


100 


110 


8 4 





480 


490 


36 12 


110 


120 


y o 





490 ! 


500 


37 8 


120 


130 


9 12 





500 


510 


38 4 


130 


140 


10 8 





510 


520 


39 


140 


150 


11 4 





520 


5.-0 


39 12 


150 


160 


12 





530 


540 


40 8 


160 


170 


12 12 





540 


550 


41 4 


170 


180 


13 8 





550 


560 


42 


180 


190 


14 4 





560 


570 


42 12 


190 


200 


15 





570 


580 


43 8 


200 


210 


15 12 





580 


5 


44 4 


210 


220 


16 8 





590 


600 


45 


2*0 


2o0 


17 4 





600 


610 


45 12 


230 


240 


18 





610 


620 


46 8 


240 


250 


18 12 





620 


630 


47 4 


250 


2C0 


19 8 





630 


640 


48 O 


260 


270 


20 4 





640 


650 


48 12 O 


23.0 


280 


21 





650 


660 


49 8 



SCHEDULE OF COURT-FEI8. 



45t 



Whet! the amount 

or value of the 

sub ject-m fitter 

exceeds. 


But does 






When the amount 

or value of the 

subject-matter 

exceeds. 


But does 






not 
exceed. 


Proper 


fee. 


not 
exceed. 


Proper fee. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. a. 


P- 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


a. p. 


660 


£?70 


50 4 





l,6oo 


l,7oo 


llo 


a 


670 


680 


51 





l,7oo 


l,8oo 


115 





6 


690 


51 12 





l,8oo 


l,9oo 


12o 





6y0 


700 


52 8 





J,9oo 


2. coo 


125 





700 


710 


53 4 





2,ooo 


2, loo 


13o 





710 


720 


54 





2, loo 


2,2oo 


135 





720 


738 


54 12 





2,2oo 


2,3oo 


Ho 





730 


740 


55 8 





2,3oo 


2,4oo 


145 





740 


750 


56 4 





2,4oo 


2,5oo 


15o 





750 


760 


57 





2,5oo 


2,600 


155 





760 


770 


57 12 





2, Goo 


2,7oo 


60 





770 


780 


58 8 





,7oo 


2,8oo 


165 





7.0 


790 


59 4 





?,8oo 


2,9oo 


17o 





790 


800 


60 





2.9oo 


3,o*o 


175 





800 


810 


60 12 





;',ooo 


3, loo 


18o 





810 


820 


61 8 





3,loo 


3,2oo 


185 





820 


830 


62 4 





3,2->o 


3,3co 


J9o 





830 


840 


63 





3,3oo 


3,4oo 


195 





840 


8'0 


63 12 





3,4oo 


3,ooo 


2oo 





850 


860 


64 8 





3,5oo 


3,6oo 


2o5 





860 


870 


65 4 





3. Goo 


3,7oo 


21o 





870 


880 


66 





3,7oo 


3 800 


215 





880 


890 


66 12 





3,8oo 


3,9oo 


22o 





890 


900 


67 8 





3,9oo 


4. GOO 


225 





900 


910 


68 4 





4,ooo 


4,lco 


23o 





910 


920 


69 





4,1 <o 


4,2oo 


235 





920 


930 


69 12 





4,2oo 


43co 


24o 





930 


940 


70 8 





4,3oo 


4,4co 


245 


a 


940 


950 


71 4 





4,4oo 


4,5on 


25o 





950 


960 


72 





4,5oo 


4,6oo 


255 





960 


970 


72 12 


o 


4,6oo 


4,7oo 


26o 





970 


980 


73 8 





4,7oo 


4.8oo 


265 


a 


980 


990 


74 4 


o 


4, too 


^,roo 


27o 





990 


1,000 


75 





4,9oo 


5.000 


275 





1,000 


3,100 


8o 


o 


5,ooo 


5,'?5o 


285 





3,100 


1,200 


85 





iyfo 


S,5co 


29* 





3.200 


1.300 


90 





;\ Too 


f> 5 75o 


3o5 





i,: j oo 


Vco 


95 





. r >.75o 


6.000 


315 





1,400 


1,500 


100 


o 


6,ooo 


u,2f>o 


325 





3,500 


1,600 


105 





G,25o 


6,5oo 


335 






452 



EEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



2 -*-» 



a^ 






O 03 • 






© 



»^ © r: 

JD © 

O 03 



Rs. 
6,5oo 
6, 5o 
7.ooo 
7,25o 
7,5oo 
7,7oo 
8,0.0 
8 25o 
8.foo 
8,75o 
9,<oo 
9,25o 
9,5oo 
9,75o 
lo ooo 
lo,5oo 
ll,ooo 
ll,5oo 
12,ooo 
12,5(0 
13,ooo 
13,5oo 
14,ooo 
14,5oo 
lo,ooo 
15,5oo 
16.000 
16,5oo 
17,ooo 
17,5oo 
18,000 
18,5oo 



But does 

not 

exceed. 



Rs. 
6,75o 
7,ooo 
7,2 o 
7,5oo 
7,7 o 
8, ooo 
8,25o 
8,5oo 
8,75o 
9,ooo 
9,25o 
9 :oo 
9,75o 
lo,ooo 
lo,5oo 

11,000 

11.5oo 
12 ; ooo 
12,5oo 
13 ooo 
l3,5oo 
14,ooo 
14,5oo 
15, ooo 
15,5oo 
16,ooo 
l£,5oo 
17,ooo 
1 ,5oo 
18,ooo 
18,foo 
19,ooo 



Proper fee. 



Rs. 

345 

355 

165 

375 

385 

395 

4o5 

415 

425 

435 

445 

455 

465 

475 

49o 

5o5 

52o 

535 

55o 

565 

5<So 

595 

61o 

625 

o4o 

655 

67o 

685 

7oo 

715 

7>o 

745 



a. 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



g © u 




Q^3 © • 






But does 


n the 
alne o 
ject-n 
xceed 


not 
exceed. 


© > -Q © 




-a 




> O 





p- 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



Rs. 
19,ooo 
19,5oo 
2o ooo 
21,ooo 
22 5 ooo 
23,ooo 
24,ooo 
25.ooo 
2 6, ooo 
27,ooo 
2^,000 
29,ooo 
3o,ooo 
32,ooo 
34,ooo 
36,000 
38,ooo 
4o : ooo 
42.000 
44 ooo 
46,ooo 
48,ooo 
5o ooo 

5 5. ooo 
60,000 

6 ,ooo 
7o s ooo 
75 ooo 
80,000 
85,ooo 
9o,ooo 
9o,odo 



Proper fee* 



Rs. 
19,5oo 
2o,ooo 
21, ooo 
2 'i ,ooo 
2 . .ooo 
24, ooo 
25.ooo 
26ooo 
27,000 
28,ooo 
29,ooo 
So.ooo 
32,ooo 
34,ooo 
36,ooo 
38,000 
4o,ooo 
4 2, ooo 
44,ooo 
46,ooo 
48,ooo 
5o ooo 
55,ooo 
60.000 
65,ooo 
7 0,000 
75,ooo 
80.000 
80,000 
9o,ooo 
9 0,000 

1,00,000 



Rs. 

7 60 

775 

795 

815 

835 

855 

8/5 

895 

915 

935 

955 

975 

9*5 

l,ol5 

l,o35 

l,o55 

l,o75 

l,o95 

1,115 

1,135 

1,155 

1,1.5 

l,2oo 

1,225 

l,25o 

1,275 

l,3oo 

1,325 

l,35o 

1,355 

l,4oo 

1,425 



P- 
o 
o 

o 
o 
o 
o 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
a 
o 
o 
o 
o 
a 
o 
o 
o 



and so on upio 4,lo>ooo — fee Rs. 3ooo. 



SCHEDULE OF COURT-FEES. 



4.U v 



Number. 



1. Application or 
petition. 



Fixed fees. 



(a) When presented 
to auy Civil, Politi- 
cal or Criminal 
C^urt, or any Exe 
cutive Officer for the 
purpose of obtaining 
a copy or transla* 
tun of any judg- 
ment, decree or 
order or of any other 
docum3nt from the 
record of the Agency. 

(6) Wnen presented 
t> a Subordinate 
Civd Court or to a 
Small Causes Court 
iu rtlatiou to any 
-mt or ease in 
which the amount 
or value of tue 
subject matter is 
less than hfty Rs. 

(c) When cjutaiuiug 
a complaint or 
charge ot any offence 
otuer tbaa an otLuoe 
tor wnicti JPohca 
Officers may uuder 
ta« Code of Uiimi- 
ual Frccdaure, arrest 
Without wauaul and 
presented to any 
Uriinmal Court. 

d) VVneu preaoatad 
10 a Civil or wnaii- 
iml Court or au 

Executive Officer Us 
low thti rau£ of an 
Assistant .Political 



Proper fea» 



One aanau 



Do. 



Eight anna** 



Pour am**. 



454 



BEWA KANTHA DIBKCTORt. 



Number. 


Fixed fees. 


Proper fee. 




Agent and not 






otherwise provided 






for. 






(e) When presented to 


Eight annas. 




a Civil, Political cr 






Criminal Court, or 






an Executive officer 






of the rank cf an 






Assistant Policd 






Agent and not 






otherwise provided 






for. 






(/) When presented 


One rupee. 




to the Prlitual 






jAg^nt or the Court 






of the Political Agent 






and not otheiwise 






provided for. 






(g) When i resented 


Two rupees. 




to the Political 






Agent or the Court 






of the Ptlitic*l 






fi gfnt for th6 exer- 






cise of its powers 






as High Court and 






not otherwise pro- 






vided for. 


One rupee. 


2 Application for 




leave to sue or 






appeal as a 






pauper. 


i 


Eight annas. 


3. Bail bond or 






other ir stru- 


! 




ng nt of obliga- 


i 




tion given in 


i 





SCHEDULE OP COURE-FEES. 



455 



Number. 



Fixed fees. 



Proper foe. 



pursuance of an 
order trade by 
a Court or Ma- 
gistrate un >er 
the Civil or 
Criminal Pro- 
cedure Code or 
by a Political 
Court, 

4. M'ikbtiarnarn* 
or Vakal*tnaitt a 



5. Memorandum 
of appeal when 
the appeal is nou 
from an onier 
rejecting a plaint 
or f r oai a decree 
or an order hav- 
ing the force of 
a decree and is 
presented, 



When presented for 
the conduct of any 
one case— 

(a) to any Civil Po- 
litical or Crimi- 
nal Court or any 
Executive Officer 
except a9 »re 
mentioned in chuse 
(b) of this number 

(b) to the Political 
Agent or the Com 
of the Political 
Agent for the exer- 
cUe of its powers 
as a High Court. 

(a) To the Court of 
the Political Agent. 

\b) To any other 
Court, 



One rupee. 



Tiro rupees. 



Three rupees. 
Two rupees. 



456 



BEWA KANTHA. DIRECTORY. 



Ndmber. 



Fiied fees. 



Proper fee. 



6, Plaint or me- 
morandum of 
appeal in a 
suit to 6bt*in 
possession of a 
wife or for 
conjugal rights. 

7. Plaint rr me- 
fuorandcm of 
appeal in pach 
of tl: e following 

8UltF. 

(i) to alter cr 
set as'de a 
s ^mmary de- 
cision or 
order of any 
Civil Court. 
{ii) to obtain a 
declaratory 
decree wl ereiq 
cc neequential 
relief is prayed 

(iii to set aside 
^ an award. 

{iv)tontt a*ide 
an adoption. 

{v) every other 
suit where it 
is not possible 
to estimate 
at a niorey 
-vane the 
subject; mat- 
ter n dispute 
and wh'ch is 
not othei wise 
provided tor. 



•»» ••• 



Five rupees. 



Ten rupees 



Ten rupees 



SCHEDULE OF COURT-FEES. 



45T 



Number. 



Fixed fees. 



Proper fee. 



8. Application of 
the nature of 
that specified in 
dau*e 17 of 
Sec nd Schedule 
of the Code of 
Civil Procedure, 
It 08. 

9. Application of 
the nature of 
that specified in 
clause 20 of 
Second Schedule 
of C*vil Proce- 
dure Code, 1908. 

10 Agreement of 
the natuie of 
that referred to 
in Order 36, 
fcule 1, of the 
First Schedule 
cf the same Code 

11. Appeal from 
order under sec- 
tion 47 of the 
Civil Procedure 
Code to an 
Agoncv Court 
other than the 
Courb of the 
Political Agent. 

12. Appeal fiom 
order under sec- 
tion 47 of the 
Civil Procedure 
Code to the 
Court of the 
Political Ag-nt 
or to Government 

58 




Five rupees. 



Do. 



• Ten rupees. 



; Eight annas. 



{Two rupees. 



458 



BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



Civil Courts—Service of summonses* 

Foreign Department. 
NOTIFICATION. 

Dated 9th April 1913. 

No. 787-1. B.— The Governor General in Council is 
pleased to notify that the courts specified ia the schedule 
hereto annexed, which have been established or cint nued 
by the Governor General in Counc 1, have power to serve 
summonses issued by Courts in British India under ths 
Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (V of 1908). 

SCHEDULE. 



Agency. 



Courts. 



Bewa Kant ha 



The Courts of the Political Argent, 
the Asi^tait Political Agent, the 
District Depu y As istant Political 
Agent and the Hazur Deputy Assistant 
Political Agent in th* Rewa Kaatha. 

The Disiric* Courts and the 
subordinate Civil Courts of the sections 
of the Bombay, Baroda and Central 
India, Godhra-Lunawada, Godhra- 
Rbthm-Nagda and Rajpipla Railways 
in the Rewa Kantha. 



SERVICE OF SUMMONSES 451 . 

£ Civil Courts— Service of summonses of and by Natiyp 
State Courts 

Bombay Castle 16th February 1915. > 

No. 990: — The following notification by the QUvierii^ 
ment of India, Foreign and Political Department, is republished. * 

No. 835 -D. 

Dated Simla, the 12th February 1915. 

" In supersession of the Notification of the Government 
o£ Indh, in the F reign Department, So. 2444 I. B., dated 
the 26th Novembar 1912, as subsequently amended, the 
Governor General in Council is pleased to declare that the 
provisions of section 92 of the G>de of Civil Procedure, 1908, 
(V cf 1908), shall apply to the Courts specified in the schedule 
hereto annexed. 

The Governor General in Council is further pleased to 
dechre that service by the said Courts of any saumoai 
issued by a Cauitin British India under the said Code shall 
be deemed to be valid service. 



SCHEDULE. 
REWA KANTHA. 

Hazur Court * 1 

Court of the Sar Nyayadhish ... I . # 

Court of the MunsifF of Nandod j* ^P 1 ? 1 * State - 

Do Do Jagadhia j 

Hazur Court e . .„ \ Chhota-Udepur 

Court of the Nyayadhish J State. 

ELzur Court } 

Court of the Karbhari I 

Cotfrt of the Naib Karohari ... ... $ Sana/ State. 

Court of the Nyayadhish ... ...J 



'4^0 BBWA KAFTHA PIBBCTOBY. 

H««ar Court - 1 Lunawada State. 

Court of the Nyayadhish ... ... J 

Haaur Court 

Cpurfcof the Sir Nyayadish \ Balasinor State, 



••• ••• 1 

»•• ••• ? 

••• ••• / 



Court of the Nyayadish 

Hazur Court 1 gunth gtate# 

Court of the Nyayadhish ' J 

Civil Courts— Service of summons of— and by Baroda courts. 

Bombay Castle, 2nd M*reh 1910. 

No. 1402.— The following Notifications by the Govern- 
ment of Iudia in the Foreign Department are republished; — 

No. 397 I. B— 25th February 1910. 

In exercise of the powers conferred by the Indian 

{Foreign jurisdiction) Order in Council, 1902, tha Governor 

{Senegal in Council is pleased to direct that a summons 

issued by any civd or levenue Court situate in the Baroia 

State, and not established or ooutinued by the authority of 

the Governjr General in Council, sh*ll, if sent to any court 

so established or conoiouei in the territories of auy Foreign 

Prince or State, be served by thit Court, as if the summons 

h*d been issued by itself, and after being so servjd, be 

^returned with an endowment ot such service under the hand 

of the Judge ot that Court. 



No. 398 I. B., 25th February 1910. 

In exercise of the powers conferred by the Indian 
4 Foreign J unsiiction ) Order in Council, 1902, iha Governor 
General in Council is pleased to declare that a summons 
issued by any Civil or Kevenue Court eatibiisnad or 
continued by the authority of the Governor General in 
Couucil in the territories of any Foreign Prince or Citato, 
may be scut for service to any Civil Court oj the Baroda 
&tate t and that of such Court returns the aummous wifcu at* 



SERVICE OF SUMMONSES 4$£ 

endorse neat signed by the Judge or other officer of t ha 
Court that the sum nons has been served, Bueh endorsement 
shall be deemed to be evidence of the service. 



( Translation from Gujarati ) m 

Civil Cases — Commissions and summonses. 

Nos. 479-485 of 1891. 

To, 

The Chiefs op Rewa K^ntha. 

la pursuance of Bombay Government Resolution No. 
5071, dated 27-6-1891, it is notified friat ttu following riles, i 
which are in force in British Civil Courts, are directed to 
be applied to Political Courts also. 

" 38 B. The Court to which a commission is sent for 
the examination of witness at tie request of one party if 
leave has been given him to j >in in the commission to 
examine his witnesses, may allow each party to cross 
ex amiue any witnesses examined by the otner party. 

11 120 C. A Civil Court to which a summons has been 
sent for service, should make a return within the time fixed 
by the summons for the hearing of tbe cause, stating whether 
the sumrn >ns has been served or not, and, if not, fcae reason 
for the non-service. 

"120. D. If a Court to which a summons has beet* 
sent for service, be satstitd that the defendant) is intentionally 
avoiding service, suoli Court snail itself direct substituted 
service to be effected in such manner as it thinks fib under 
the provisions of tbe Code of Civil procedure without further 
reference to the court issung the summons/ 1 ' 



462, REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Civil Courts— Execution of Pecrees of British India Courts 
by Native State Courts and vice versa. 

Pclitical renartment, 
Bombay Castle, 26th September 1911. 
No, 7279. The 'ollowing Notification by the Govern- 
ment cf India in the- Foreign Department is republished for 
general information : — 

(Extract from the London Gazette of Friday, 7th July 1911) 
No 2353 J. B dated Simla, 22nd Heptt ruber 1911. 
It is notified for general information that the following 
Native states have agreed that the decrees passed by Civil 
Courts in British India may be executed by the Court3 in 

their territories ran ed b^low, namely : — 

* , * * * 

Baicda — All Civil Courts until further orders as per 
Notification No. 908 of 27th May 1915. 
REWA KaNTHA. 
Huzur Court of Rajpipla. 
Court of the Sar kyayadhish of Rajpipla. 
"< * Court of the Munsiff of Nandod. 

* Court of the Mun«iff of Jhagadhia. 
( Added per G. N. 1078 of 10th June 1915 ). 
Hazur Court of the Baria State. 
Court of the Karbhari, Baria State. 
Court of the Naib Karbhari, Baria State. 
Court of the ftyayadhish, Baria State. 
Hazur C urt of Balasinor. 

Court of the D strict Judge & Adviser, Balasinor. .; 
Court of the Nyp.yadhish, Balasinor. 
Hazur Court of the Sunth State. 
Court of the Karbhari, Sunth State. 
Court of the Nyayadhisb, Sunth State. 
Hazur Court, Chhota Udepur State. 
District Judges Court, Chhota Uuepur. ! 

Court of the Nyajadhish, Chhot* Udepur. 



• Added as per Gr.o£I. Notification No. 2837 LB. dated 2 6-8-2 0. 



EXECUTION OF DKCBED8. 46ft 

Civil Courts— Execution of decrees of Agency Courts by 
Courts of Baroda. 

G. of I. No. 2621 I. B dated 24th December 1912. 

i*. G. 44 o£ 6-1-13. 

It is notified fur general information that the following 
Native States have egrted that the Hecrae3 passed by C vil 
Courts established or continued fay taa authority of the 
Governor General in Council in the territories of any Foreign 
Prince or State may bs executed by the Courts in the 
territories named below : — 

Mysore. — All Civil Courts until further orders. 

Baroda. — Do. as i er G. of I. Notification 

£01 1. B. dated 12th 
May 19 16. 



Civil Courts —Execution of decrees if Native State Counts 
by Agency Courts. 

No. 399 I. B. dated 25th February 1910. 

In exorcise of the powers conferred by the Indian 
(Foreign Jurisdiction) Order inCounM*, 1902, the Governor- 
General in Council is pleased to notify tint a decree cf any 
Civil Gouit situate in the Baroda 3 cat*, and not established 
or continued by the authority of the Governor General in 
Council may, if sant br execution t> a Cjurfc e'stabli bed or 
continued by the authority of the Governor General m Council 
in the territories of any Foreign Prince or State, ba ex*5Ute£ 
by that Court to the same exteut & in the same nounajr as 
that Court might execute, within the lioiit* of ft* jurisdiction* 
a decree made by itself. 



464 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Civil Courts — Execution of decrees of Native State Courts 
by Ccurts of British India. 

Political Department. 

Bombay Castle, 11 ih July 1903. 

No. 5046.— The f< lh^ing N( tification by the Govern- 
ment of IrdiiJ in the Fc reign Department is published for 
general irformatirn with reference to Bombay Government 
Notification, Political Department, No. 6985 dated 27th 
September 1902. 

No. S877 I. A. Bated Simla the 13th July 1906. 
In exercise of the powers conferred by Sectim 229 B, 
cf the Code o£ Civil Procedure ( XIV of 1882 ) and in 
supersession o( the Notification of the Government of India 
in the Foreign Department No. 4052 i. A. dated 18th 
Septembrr 1902 the Governor General in Council is pleased 
io declare that the decrees of the un lermbntioned Civil 
Cotrts situate in the territories of Native Princes or States 
in alliance with His Majesty, which have not been established 
or continued by the authority of the Governor General in 
Council may be executed in British India, as if they had 
been made by the Courts of British India. 

# * * 

Hazur Court of Rajpipla. 

Court of the Sar Nyayadhisb, Rajpipla. 

Court of the Munsiffof Nandod ,. 4 1 as per Notifn. No. 

» of Jagadhia ... J 2 836 of 26-8 20. 

(Added as per Notification No. 430 I. B. dated 
13th April 1915). 

1 Huzur Court of the Baria State. 

2 # Court of Kvrbhari of the Barb State. 

3 Court of the Naib Karbhari ot the Baria Siatev ••■ 

4 Ccurt of the Nyayadhish of the Baria State. 



EXECUTION OF DECREES. It>5 

BALASINOR. 

1 Hazur Court, Balasinor. 

2 Court of the District Judge and Adviser, Balasinor, 

3 Court of the Nyayadhish, Balasinor. 

SUNTH. 

1 Huzur Court of the Sunth State. 

2 Court of the Karbhari of the Suuth State. 

3 Court of the Nyayadhish of the Sunth State. 

(As per Government of India Notification No. 1047 
I. B. of 10th June 1915). 
The Hazur Court of Chhota Udepur State. 
The District Judge's Court, Chhota Udepur. 
The Court of the Nyayadhish, Chhota Udepur. 



Civil GoiLVts— Remission of fees on copies of decrees of 
Baroda Courts. 

Political Department, 
Bombay Castle, 3rd October 1916. 

No. 7125. — The following Notification by the Govern- 
ment of India, Finance Department, is republished :— 

SEPARATE REVENUE-STAMPS, 

No. 1341 F, dated Simb, the 26h September 1916. 
In exercise of the powers conferred by Section 35 of 
the Court Fees Act, 1870 ( V\l. of 1870 ), the Governor 
General in Council is -pleased to r^jaifc the fees chargeable 
under the said Act en copies of decrees of Civil or Revenue 
Courts situate in the territories of His Highness the Gaekwar 
cf Baroda forwarded to any Court in British India for 
execution in pursuance of the provisions cf section 44 of the 
Civil Procedure Code, 1908, (V of 1908), 



59 



466 BEWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

Civil Courts. — Proclamation of sale in execution of decree. 

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION. 

No. 7280:— dated the 25th October 1906.— The GDvernor 
in Council is pleased to direct that when an Agaacy Court 
acting on the civil side is under the necessity of preparing 
a proclamation of a sale, the proclamation should be prepared 
in the Form A annexed to this circular. 

If, in the case of a Hindu judgment-debtor, it is 
desired to sell the interest of any other member of the 
family (e. g. that of a minor son or brother), the name of 
such member and the fact that his interest is being soli 
must be stated in the proclamation, as otherwise his interest 
will not pass to the purchaser. To the proclamation should 
be appended a list, in Form B, of all claims for which, in 
the opinion of the Court, there is a reasonable and probable 
cause — such as claims of coparcaner, or reversioners in the 
case of Hindu females, or motgagees or tenants, etc. The 
]lifit may be varied as occasion requires. 




1XBCTTI0H OF DECREES. 4ST 

Form A. Proclamation of sate, 

Cturt of (Full designation.) 

Original suit No, of 

Appeal in the court of 

Appeal in the court of 

Plaintiff Defendant. 

(a) In execution of a decree of Court in the 

above case, dated the day of in virtue whereof 

a sum of was adjudged to be payable by* the 

said unto the said and of a 

warrant, dated the day of , for giving efiect 

to the said decree by sale of property, notice is hereby givea 
that on the day of at o'clock A M., A. b, 

of this court (or other person appointed) will, at 
sell by auction to the highest bi Uer and without reserve the 
right, title and interest of the s>ud in the several 

artio'es of moveable and immoveable property herauader 
specified, 

MOVEABLE PROPERTY. 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 












Whether any claim 




Number 








has b3en set up 


Lot 


and 


Where 


Where 


When 


to the lot (included in 


number 


description 


attached 


now 


to be 


the annexed list 




of 




placed. 


viewed. 


(Form ti) with a 




articles. 








reterence theieto). 



* This to be expressed in accordance with 
execution. 



the dec* je in course o£ 



468 



REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

IMMOVEABLE PROPERTY. 



S 

53 

c 



o 

h3 



o C5 

+*.2 

Co <p > 

£ s s 

o o 

H3 *i» ^ X2 

rj (C > 

° L, * ~ 

- o _2 O 
Cm 

Cu CO 

* °- - E 

° ° 2 e 
od 3 a 

' r ° IS 

2- +■> * J3 

*- £ S 3 fe 

O 3 fi ^ 

CD ••■* ^2 *^ 

^ ffi «0 u 



3 






as 

.S-d 
2 ° 
"3 - -3 

c 



a 



c 
.5P 

Km O) 

I* 3 

£2 OD 

en 

^^ 

is -^ 

5 o 

75 



6 



8 



8 - 

-2 5 
bo 

"3 © 

CD -is 

a cd © 

•"• — -a 

■•* o 



be 

...2 

CD OP 



a s 



CD 

> 

3 a 



c 

o 
a 



as 
cu 

© 
© 

o 
a 

CD 
CO 

co 

Sm 



a a 



-a 

a 



O © 

-.2 

CD C3 

* 2 

— • rr> 

— c5 

JC3 



ONI g 

s I 

.2 2 

o , -h 

CD 

UD ^ 

«- '► 

CD •— • 

-So 

a . 
3 o 

CD CD 
d5 O 

ao 

CD 

2 -a 



© a 

CD 9 
DC XI 
* © 

... «<-> O *** 






CD Q 



a .2 



_q CD 



3> 



co © a *r" 
CD <n o £ 

s- CL+» CD 

^ ir* cp 3 

O g " "O 

M CD 

5- a -§ § 

.sp-s go; 



£3 

** o J3 
a ® 3, 

9 i; o 

J « O 

O O a, 

§ oO 

o-g o 

43 CD 0O 

^2« 



EXECUTION OF DECREES. 

FORM B. 



46dt. 



a 

O 



a 

85. 



© 



O 

hi 

a, 



3 . 
*5 © 

S3 

CD w 

02 

3 0D 

03 O 

hi 

© 

^.2 

""*' 3 

(M 00 

fa o 

JT-3 

a* 





Is 

© 



© 
3 

© 

3 

o 

a 

hi 
o 



a 
3 
o 

a 

00 

"3 

a 



08 

85 



d « ; 

o o £ 
** hi 

<D . © 

- ° a rt 

o 3 -a 

Q- „, O © 

<° 3 

O 



0D 43 

* a 

o g 

* 3 

SO O 

h. 13 

* 0) 



flC C 




10 



CD 



8.3 

© 



3 

3 
C3 



^ .cfl <*-i ^ 

CD 



s 
o 

a 

00 

© 

*3 



2^ 

~ a 
© * 

g 2' 

-3 2 
"Sb- 



3 
(D 
<D 

3 3 

i-3 CD 

05 > 

hi <S 

w -3 



© 



^o*£ ® 



©.2 



>> P 3 

P*>3 

3 a "3 "O 

03 S a a 

~ § a -o 

w *> o © « 

«t3 ^ o h 

aa> o 

~ 3 >>* a 

g.s ^q <w o 

o 



3 ^ 

a a 

jo a> 

^ a 

2 © 

* o 

© *• 



. •* CD 

hi _ 

«« C 

5 « 

2^ hi 
O 

11 

53 Id 

s\3- 



o5 



73 £» 

a> Xt 

© 

> .2 



a „.« 



3 



09 

00 



is t< 

-3 •* 



a 






a 

3 



J3 



a> 
•3 

3 
a> 

3 

T5 

3 



^* 

-3 
a> 
o 

3 
-3 

* S 



J3 



a - 



© 

a 

art 
CO 

© 



a 
o 



hi 



50 

© 



-3 

3 
J0 

3 
O 

3 
© 



© 

Q 



-a 

CT> 



3 

a 

3 



-3 

© 
3 
*3 

J © 

5 3 

3 0Q 

o 

3 



© 

a 

XI 



Q 



OX) 

h> 

s 

ht 

**^ ' 

O 
© 

© 



aa 

© 



4?0 BBWA KAKTHA DIRECTOBT. 

Copies— Rules for applications for. 

NOTIFICATION. 
No. 1 448 of 1903. 

Godhra, 3rd August 1903. 

The following rules regarding applications for copies of 
papers from Agency Courts, which have been approved and 
sanctioned by Government, are published for general infor* 
mation. 

I. Applications fir copies may be m de either in 
person (L e. by the applicant or by his authorised Agant) or 
by post. 

II. If the application is made in person or by agent, 
the estimated cost of the copy shall be deposited; but if the 
papers, of *hich copies are appliad for, are not in the 
covrt to which the application is made and it is nob 
consequently practicable to frame an estimate of the cost, 
the applicant or his agent shall pay an advance fce of Rs. 2* 
Every other application for a copy shall be accompanied 
by an advance fee of Rs». 2 and shall distinctly state the 

following particulars:— 

(a) Whether the applicant desires himself bo arrange 
to take delivery, and if so, whether in person or by what 
Agent, or, 

(b) "Whether the applicant desires that the copy 
should be sent by post, and if so, to whom and how it 
should te addressed, or, 

(c) Whether he desires the copy delivered through 
the Thauadar, anu if so, through which Thanadar, I 

III If copies are delivered personally the balance 
clue \till be recovered on delivery or the excess received will 
be refunded, as the case may be. If delivery is made 
through the post,, the picket containing the cajpies will bia 
registered, and if any balance is dua in respect of the cost 
of such copies, it will be sent V. P. P. Should however, 



THB INDIAN PENAL CODE. itl 

there be any excess sum repayable, it will be remitted by 
mon^y order. 

IV". The time excluded in computing limitation will 
be from the date of receipt of the application ul til the date 
on which the copy was ready for delivery 

V. Any application for copies, which does not conform 
with these conditions, will be returned for amendment. 

G, GARMICHAEL, 

Political Agent, Rewa Kantha* 



Criminal Gases— Indian Penal Code applied to the Agency. 

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION. 
No. 3801— dated the 13th June 1904. 

In exorcise of the power delegated under the Indian 
(Foreign Jurisdiction) Order in Gjuneil, 1902, by the 
Governor General in Council, in the Foreign Dapartaoenb, 
No. 2559 I. A. dated the 19th June 1903, and of all other 
powers enabling him in this bahalf, the Governor in Council 
is pleased, in supersession of all previous orders on the 
same subject, so far as they may be inconsistent with any 
thing herein contained, to apply to the whole of the terri- 
tories included in the Political Agency of Rewa Kantha 
as entered in the schedule annexed to the Notification of 
the Government of India (other than those in which the 
Governor General in Council does not for the time being 
exercise legislative jurisdiction), the enactment specified in the 
schedule hereto annexed, in so far as the same may be 
applicable ; 

Provided, first, that references in the said enactment 
as so applied to British India shall be read as referring to 
the said territories. 

. Provided, sxmdly, that the further modification ietfe 
forth in the schedule ehall be made ia the said enactment a% 
«o applied ; 



<4T2 BEWA KANTHA BIRECTORY. 

Provided, thirdly , that for tie purpose of facilitating 
the application of the said enactment, any court in the said 
territories may construe the provisions thereof with such 
alterations not affecting the substance, as may be necessary 
or proper to adapt it to the matter before the Court. 

THE SCHEDULE. 

Enactment applied. Further modification. 

The Indian Penal To the explanation to section 361, the 

Code (Act XLV following words sbnll be added namely : — 
of 1860). 

6 and where no person is so entrusted 
' with the care or custody of such 
" miner or other person, tie latter 
" shall be deemed to be taken out of 
" keeping of his lawful guardian, without 
" the consent cf such guardian, *( if hfr 
" is removed beyond the territDriat 
" limits of any State or Taluka without 
" the consent of the political or chief 
" Executive authority exercising juris- 
" diction in such State or Taluka)." 
Note. — The Criminal Procedure Code has been applied 
by another Government Notification see page 433 supra. 



Criminal cases— Powers delegated to Revenue Commissioners. 

No. 3567, dated 7th June 1905,— Whereas various 
orders have from time to time bean issued by Government 
in regard to the criminal jurisdiction of Commissioners of 
Revenue in the Political Agencies under their supervision: 
{Atiid ^whereas doubts* have arisen as to the construction of 
the -said orders, and it is therefore eXpedienti to make better 
provision for tjae purpose of determining that jurisdiction; 
55be f Gqven$pr ; in C^u^cil, in exercise of the power delegated 

- ^*Sub»^ate^ 7585 dated the 24th Noveffib&r 

1905. /< 



under the Indian (Foreign jurisdiction) Order in Council, 
1902, by the Governor General in Council in the notification 
of the Government of India, in the Foreign Dapartment, 
No. 2859 I. A., dated the 19th June 1903, and of all 
other powers enabling him in this behalf, is pleased, in 
supersession of all previous orders on this same subject, so 
far as they may be inconsistent with anything herein 
contained, to issue the following orders for the said purpose.. 

The Commissioner shall exercise the jurisdiction of -a>. 
High Court, as described in the Code of Criminal* Procedure, 
1898 (Act V of 1898), in respect of offences over which the 
jurisdiction of a Court of Session is exercised by the 
Political Agent, subject to the following limitations : — 

(a) In the case cf every appeal by a person convicted * 
of an offence punishable with dea'h or by a co-accused of 
such convict, the said jurisdiction shall be exercised by the 
Governor in Council ; 

(b) In every case decided by the Commissioner the 
Governor in Council reserves jurisdiction to call for the 
record and pass orders as he thinks fit. 

Criminal Law Amendmant Ad— applied to Agency areas. 

No. 32— In exercise of the powers delegated under the 
Indian ( Foreign Jurisdiction ) Order in Council, 1902, by the 
Governor General in Council in Notification of the Govern* 
ment of India in Foreign Department No. 2959-1. A. dated 
the 19th June 1903, the Governor in Council is pleased to' 
apply; 

The Defence of India (Criminal Law Amendment ) Act, 

1915, 
The rulfes framed from time to time by the Governor 

General in Council in pursuance of section 2 of that 

Act, and 

The provisions of the Defence of India Ordinance, 1915, 
(III of 1915), 



474 MWA KANTHA PIRTOTOJtY. 

to all places within which the Governor in Conncil is 
authorized to make rules and orders by the said notification, 
including the Thana Circles and Civil Stations, and the 
Cantonment of Deesa: 

Provided, firstly, that in the Act, Rules and Ordinance 
as so applied reference to British India shall be read as 
including the said areas and that in the rules as so applied 
references to the Governor General in Council shall be read 
as references to the Governor in Council ( G. N. 4455 of 
4th June 1918). 

Provided, secondly, that for the purpose of facilitating 
the application of the said Act, Rules and Ordinance any 
Court exercising jurisdiction in the said areas may construe 
the provisions of the said Act, Rules and Ordinance with 
such alterations not affecting the substance as may be 
necessary or proper to adapt them to the matter before it. 

Criminal Complaints.— No British subject to be arrested 
by Native State Officers in Khalsa limits. 

No. 1208 of 1864:. 
To, 

The Pbincipal Chiefs of Rewa Kantha. 

It appears that yoa exercise direct jurisdiction on the 
subjects of Panch Mahals and Jambughoda Taluki and otaer 
Sarkari Khalsa Zillas, by -arresting them from British limits 
and confining and fining them. This practice is quite improper. 
It is therefore directed that you should not henceforth directly 
arrest and take away any suoject of the said Shaba Zillas, 
even though you may havd any claim against them, nor 
should you exercise any kind of authority over them by 
imprisoning or fining them: you should bear this in mind, 
and if you have any ckim against any of them, you should 
adopt the custQm of writing to me. If in spite of the above 
warning, it is ever found that you should exercise any 
authority ever them by arresting them or in any other way, 
you will be held responsible for it. Dated 2nd May 1864. 



CRIMINAL CASES. 475 

Criminal cases — Confessions of aecused persons. 

No. 2799. 

Judicial Department. 
Bombay Castle, 24th April 1900. 

NOTIFICATION. 

The followidg general Rule, made by Her Majesty's 
High Court of judicature at Bombay under section 15 of 
the statute 24 and 25, Victoria, chapter 104, has received 
the sanction of the Governor in Council and is published 
for general information. 

(To be inserted as Circular No. 30-C at page 20 of 
the High Court Criminal Circular Order Book). 

30-C. In cases sent to Magistrates, in order that the 
confessions o£ accused peraon3 may be recorded under Section 
164 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, the Magistrates 
should invariably satisfy themselves that the confessions 
are voluntary, by questioning the accused And by all means 
in their power, including the examination of the bodies of 
the accused, whenever feasible, and the accused persons 
consent to such examination. The record of confessions 
should distinctly show whether bodily examination had baea 
made or not ; if not made, whether the omission was due 
to reluctance on the part ot the aecused. In the event of 
such examination revealing prima facie grounds for suspecting 
violence, the Magistrates should have such accused persons 
examined by a Medical Officer. 

R. J. C. LORD, 

Under Secretary to Government. 

Note. — ' 

This circular has been adopted also by all States in 
Rewa Kantha. 



476 KEWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

Criminal Procedure Code* — Power conferred \ on 'Political 
Agent. 
:\\ :••■ ; V Bombay Castle, 28th September 1910. 

No. 6229.^-H- E.the Governor io Council is plea8ed 
under section 73 (3) of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 
1898, to delegate to the Political Agent, Rewa Kantha, 
the powers conferred on the Local Government by Section 13 
(1) of the Code. 

By order of H. E the right Honourable 

the Governor in Council, 
C. A. KINKAID, 
Acting Secretary to Government. 



Bombay Castle, 7th November 1910. 

Nd. 7060 — H. E. the Governor in Council is pleased 
under Section 8 of the Criminal Procedure Code to constitute 
the Sanjeli and *Jambughoda States in the Rewa Kanbha 
Agency a sub-division of that Agency for the purposes of 
the Criminal Procedure Code. 

By order of H. E. the right Honourable 

the Governor in Council 
C. A. KINKAID, 
Acting Secretary to Government. 



Criminal cases. — Execution of death sentences.— 

NOTIFICATION OP THE GOVERNMENT 

OF INDIA. 

No. 1431-1. dated the 27th April, 1898. 

Whereas a capital sentence is occasionally passed by a 
British court' exercising, in or with respect to territory 
beyond the limits of British India, jurisdiction which 
the Governor General in Cjunoil has in such territory; 



And whereas there may be in each* territory no secure 
place for the confinement of a prisoner under sentence of 
death or no suitable applianoss for his execution in a 
decent and humane manner ; 

In exercise of the powers conferred by Sections 4 and 
5 of the. Foreign Jurisdiction - apd Extradiction Act ( XXI 
of 1879), and of all other powers enabling him in this 
bshalf, the Governor General in Council is pleasad to direct 
as follows : — 

1. When any person is sentenced to death by a 
British Court in the exercise [of such jurisdiction as is 
referred to in the first paragraph of the preamble to this 
Notification, and, in the opinion of the Court, such sentence 
should, tor any such reason as is referred to in the second 
paragraph of the said preamble, be executed in British India, 
the Court shall issue its warrant for such execution to the 
Superintendent or Keeper of a jail in British India, and 
shall in such warrant prescribe, as nearly as may be, the 
place in British India where such superintendent or keeper 
is to cause the execution to be carried out. 

2. The jail in British India to which the Court may 
send its warrant under the provisions of this Notification 
shall be such as the Governor General in Counqil or a 
Local Government authorized by him in this behalf may, by 
general or special order, direct. 

3. Every warrant for the execution of a sentence of 
death to be issued by a Court under the provisions of this 
notification shall be in the form set forth in the schedule 
hereto annexed. 



4?8 BEWA KANTHA BIBECTORY. 

Order appointing Jails in Bombay Presidency to ichich 
certain British Courts beyond British India may send 
their warrants for the execution of capital sentences. 

No. 4220, dated the 3rd July 1895. 

Whereas in exercise of the powers conferred by section 2 
of Act 5 of 1893 ( being an Act to legalise in certain 
cages the execution within British India, of capital sentences 
which have been passed by British Courts exercising, in or 
with respect to territory beyond tha limits of British India, 
jurisdiction, which the Governor General in Council has in 
such territory), and in order to give effect to the provisions of 
the notification by the Government of India, in the Political 
Department, No, 1431-1 dated 7th April 1893, the Governor 
General in Council has been pleased, by letter No. 3080-1 
dated 2nd September 1893, to authorise the Governor of Bombay, 
in Council, to direct to what jails within the territories subject 
to the jurisdiction of the Governor of Bombay in Council, 
$uch courts may send their warrants for the execution of the 
capital sentences and the provisions of the said Act and 
Notification, and to order the Superintendents of all such 
jails to execute all sentences ot death in respect whereof 
warrants may ba issued to them respectively by any such 
Courts as aforesaid. 

Now the Governor in Council is pleased, in pursuance 
of the said authorization, 

(a) to direct that the jail specified in respect of each 
court mentioned in the table herein below contained shall be 
the jail within the territories subject to the jurisdiction of 
the Governor of Bombay in Council, to which such courts 

may send such warrants as aforesaid, and 

(b) to order that the Superintendent of every such 
jail shall, on receipt of such warrants from a Court hereby 
authorized to send such warrant to such jail, cause the 



CRIMINAL CASKS. 47* 

execution to be carried out therein in the same manner and 

subject to the same conditions in all re3p9cts as if it were 
a warrant duly issued under th9 provisions of Section 381 
of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1882. 



Criminals— maintenance charges of. 

CIRCULAR. 
No. 50 of 1904. 

RBWA KANTHA AGENCY OFFICE, 

Camp Tanda, 8th January 1904. 
In modification of the present practice relating to the 
recovery of maintenance charges of accused persons &c, 
Government have, in their Resolution No. 7810 dated 20th 
November 1903, Political Department, been pleased to accept 
the proposal that in cases of extradition between the Baroda 
State and British Districts of the Bombay Presidency, the 
conveyance and maintenance charges of accused persons and 
of cattle should be borne by the authorities making the 
surrender. They have further directed that the same procedure 
will be followed in Thana Circles and managed States and 
trust that it will be adopted by Native States in this 
Presidency. The Political Agent therefore requests that the 
Chiefs and Administrators of Native States in this Agency 
will be so good as to adopt the procedure sanctioned by 
Government. 

G. CARMICHAEL, 

Political Agent, Rewakantha. 



Deccan Agriculturists Relief Act— applied to the Meicases+ 

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION. 

No- 1548, dated the 1st March 1909. 

In exercise of the powers delegated uncler the Indian 

( Foreign Jurisdiction ) Order in Council, 1902, by the 

Governor General in Council in the notification of the Govern- 



4$& RE WA . KJOfflB AA DIRECTORY, 

meftt tit India in ' the > Foreign Department No. T 2859 LA. 
dated the 19th June 1903, the Governor in Council is pleased 
to apply Sections 1, 7, 11 to 21, 23, 56, 60, 62 and 71 A 
and Chapters V, VI & VII of the Deecan* Agriculturists 
Belief Act (1879; to the Pandti and Sankheda Mewas Thana 
Circles of the Rewa Kantha Agency. 



Dirrct Correspondency— between Mamlatdars and 

/. Native State Officers. 

No. 136 of 1912. 

Rewa Kantha Agency Office, 

12th Januaty 1912. 
CIRCULAR. 

Government, in their Resolution No. 8065 dated 19th 
Ootober 1911, Political Department below Government 
Resolution, Revenue Department, No. 8858, dated 21st Sept- 
ember 1911, having sanctioned the mode of direct correspond- 
ence on certain matters between Mamlatdars in British 
Districts and Officers of similar status, and a question having 
been raised as to how the Mamlatdars should address the 
Tfcanadars of the states of the Rewa Kantha Agency in the 
matter, the Political Agent is pleased to prescribe the 
following mode of address. 

The practice in vogue between the Agency Tha,nd$rs 
& Mamlatdars in British Districts should be followed, that 
is to say, all Thanadars in State Service should write a yadi 
to the mamlatdars and address them as "Meherban Mamlatdar 
Saheb." The Mamlatdars should write a yadi to the Thanadars 
and address those Thandad*rs who draw Rs. 100 per month 
and over as "Meherbati Thanadar Saheb" and those Thanadars 
who draw bdow Rs. 100 £er month as "Azam Thanadar 
Saheb." 

5 J. GHOSAL, 

k; v ■ ..,, , Political Ageat, ; Be^^K*rf^i 



DIRECT OFFICIAL COBRESPONDENCB. Ill 

Direct Official Correspondence— Rules regarding direct 
correspondence between Police officers of the Native States 
of Rewa Kantha Agency and the states of Cambay, 
Dharampur, Bansda and Sachin on the\one hand and 
the states of Kathiawar Agency and the Kathiawar Agency 
Police on the other. 

AGENCY NOTIFICATION. 

Dated 18th October 1912. 

No. 60 — With reference to the rules to regulate direct 
correspondence between Police officers published under Agency 
Notification No. 4 dated the 31st January 1910, it is hereby 
notified for the information and guidanoa of all concerned 
that Government have been pleased to sanction the adoption 
of those Rules as between the native states of the Rewa 
Kantha Agency and the states of Cambay, Dharampur, 
Bansda and Sachin on the one hand and the states of the 
Kathiawar Agency and the Kathiawar Agency Police on the 
other. 

AGENCY NOTIFICATION. 

Dated the 31st January 1910. 

No. 4. — The following rules to regulate direct corres- 
pondence between the Police Officers of the Native States 
of Kathiawar (a) inter se, and (b) with the Police officers of 
the Baroda Darbar and the Agency Police, which were 
agreed to by the representatives of States at the Annual 
meeting of the Karbharies held on the l7ch March, 1909^ 
have been approved by Government as an experimental 
measure and are hereby published for general information. 



Rules defining the scope of direct correspondence between 
Police Officers of the states of Kathiawar inter se and 
between the Police Officers of the Kathiaww states and those 
of Baroda Da*bar and the Agency Police; 
61 



482" BBWA KANTHA D1RBCT0RY. 

1. • On a written requisition from an investigating 
Police Officer of any rank, any Police officer in charge of a 
Station shall record the statements of witnesses and shall 
immediately furnish copies to the officer deputed. 

2. When witnesses residing in any of the said territories 
are required for the purpose of identifying accused persons 
under arre3t and awaiting trial, the Police Officer in charge 
of a Station in charge of such a case may write direct 
sending bhatta money to the corresponding Polise Officer ia 
whosa jurisdiction the witnesses are residing, requesting him 
to send such witnesses, bub n^ compulsory process will b9 
used. 

3. A Police Officer in charge of a Station may, at 
his discretion, send intimation regarding the occurrence of 
a cognizable offence or the loss of any property in his own 
jurisdiction to the corresponding Police Officers of other 
jurisdictions direct. The latter will take such action as they 
think to be necessary. 

4. Any Police officer in pursuit of criminals should, 
on written requisition, be given all assistance by the local 
police officers in the pursuit and arrest of the criminals. In 
the event of any criminal being Eound, the ordinary procedure 
prescribed by the Extradition Rules in force for the time 
being will b3 followed. 

5. No Magistrate or Police officer in a foreign juris- 
diction shall be called as a witness to give evidence in a 
foreign court in connection with confessions, Panchnamas cr 
statements recorded or property recovered by thsm under 
these Rules. 

6. Chief Police Officers of different jurisdictions may 
also make direct communications with each other on the 
following matters: — 

(a) Cooimiinicating the antecedents of bad or suspicious 
characters, so far as these may be known to or can be 
ascertained by the communicating Police Officer. 



ENCTMBEBED ESTATES BTJLE3. #8& 

(b) Obtaining evidence of previous convictions in so 
far as these can be ascertained from the Police records. 

(c) Giving information regarding released ooaviots. 
( For obtaining this kind of information, direct references 
between the Chief Police officers of the jurisdiction in which 
the same convict was to reside after his release are allowed.) 

(d) Enquiries regarding the antecedents and character 
of police recruits; such particulars may be communicated so 
far as they are known or can be ascertained by the com- 
municating Police Officer. 

7. The arrangement may be terminated by either party 
on giving six months* notice of its intention to do so. 



ENCUMBERED E3TATE3 RULE3. 

Sanctioned in Government Resolution No. 4264, dated 
the 8th July 1897. 

Rules for the Management of Encumbered Estates in the 

Retva Kantha and Mahi Kantha Agencies and the 

Palanpur Superintendence/. 

Whereas it is expedient to provide for the relief of 

_, , , certain indebted Talukdars and Giraeias- 

irreamble. 

in the Rewa Kantha and Mahi Kantha 

Agencies and the Palanpur Superintendency, and to maintain 

the existinor status of such Talukdars and Girasias, and at the 

same time to secure the punctual payment by them of tribute 

and ether Government dues ; the following Rul^s have bsen 

made with the consent, approval and sanction of His 

Excellency the Governor in Council, and are hereby 

promulgated, and shall come into force on and from the 1st 

September 1897:— 



**H B*WA KANTOA PJRBCTORT. 

These rules may be applied to Talukdars at present 

exercising hereditary jurisdiction or 

Definition, " Estate- .„i _ , j • x , , ., , 

holder" whose names are entered in the tribute 

list or who hold and possess Estates on 

political tenure, subject to administrative charges, and to 

Girasias who can prove their direct descent from the ancestor 

of any suoh Talukdars and who are still in the possession of 

their own Giras Estates. Any Talukdar or Girasia to 

whoso Estate these rules may be applied is hereinafter 

desjgnated the " Estate-holder " 

Bute I. 
Whenever it shall appear to the satisfaction of a 
Political Officer, not lower in rank than 

Recommendation for an Assigfcant Political Agent or 
application ot Kules to . 

Encumbered Estate. Superintendent, from enquiries made 

either of his own motion or upon an 

applicatic n from a Talukdar or Girasia, to whom these Rules 

are applicable, that any such Talukdar or Girasia is, either 

personally or in respect of his landed Estate, subject to debts 

or liabilities of such an amount that there is no reasonable 

anticipation that they can or will be liquidated in any other 

way, he shall recommend that these Rubs be applied to the 

said Estate as an Encumberei Estate. 

Provided that no application from a tribut9-paying 

Talukdar in the Mahi Kan: hi Agency 

J l°- V if X t0 A the shall make it incumbent on such Poliui- 

Mahi Jiantha Agency. 

cal Officer to take any proceeding 
under this Rule. 

Rule II. 

Such recommendation shall be made in the form of a 

report, containing full particulars 

Form etc, of recom- regarding the Estate and its liabilities 
emendation. t t> & 

aod the iuab lity of the Estate-holder 

to meet the liabilities, to the Political Agant or Political 

Superintendent! as the case may be. 



ENCUMBERED ESTATES RULES. 



«* 



Rule III. 
The Political Agent or Political Superintendent, on 
receiving the report prescribed by the 

bSS Brfite b^ D K m ~ laSt P recedin g Rule > aad affc9r satisfying 
under management* himself that there is a reasonable case 

for applying these Rules, may publicly 
notify that the said estate is, from the date of such notification, 
an Encumbered Estate and is placed under management/, and 
will be dealt with in the manner provided by these Rules. 

Provided that no management under these Rule3 shall 

extend beyond the period of twenty 

Proviso as to duration from the dat9 of the a f oresa J d 

01 management. 

notification. At the end of that time, 

all debts and liabilities, except Government dues, existing at 

the time of the afore said notification, and comprised in the 

scheme of liquidation hereinafter defined, shall be deemed to 

be fully discharged and satisfied for all intents and purposes 

whatsoever. 

Rule IV. 

For every Estato so placed' under management, a 

Manager shall be appointed, who shall^ 

^Manao-er. ° unless the Political Agsnt or Political 

Vesting o£ Estate Superintendent in any case otherwisa 

in Manager. directs, be one of his Assistants. There 

shall vest in the Manager, for the purposes of administering 

the said Encumbered Estate, all and every right to moveable 

and immovenble property of or to which the Estate-holder 

was, on the date of the notification, possessed or entitled, or 

which may thereafter, during the continuance of the manage- 

m9nt, be acquired by or devolve on him. 

Provided that the words *• moveable property " in thi« 

Rule shall not be held to include 

Definition. "Move- , , ., , •' ■ 1 

, „ household goods or wearing apparel 

able broperty.'' . . , * A , i f * 

required for the personal us3 or tha 

said Estate-holder or any member of his family. The Estate- 



486 BEWA KAHTHA DIMCTORY. 

holder shall be bound to furnish a list of all moveable 
property in his possession, and the Manager may require 
that all surplus ornaments and other property in the possession 
of the Estate-holder shall be produced before him for 
disposal. 

Rule V. 

From the date of the aforesaid notification any pro- 
ceedings pending in any Civil Court in 
^Effect of notification, regpec t to any debt or liability of the 

Estate-bolder shall be stayed, and tho 
operation of all processes, executions and attachments of or 
by any Civil Court, then in force in respect of the Estate, 
shall become inoperative: and so long as the Estate remains 
under management as an Encumbered Estate, no fresh pro- 
ceedings, processes, executions or attachments shall be instituted 
in or issued from or ordered by any such Court in respect 
of the Estate holder's debts and liabilities. 

Rule VI, 

From the date of the aforeiaid 

IncompeteDcy of notification the Estate-holder shall be- 

Estate-holdar to con- 
tract, &c. come and shall be, so long as the manage- 
ment continues, incompetent— 

(a) to enter into any contract involving himself 
or the Estate in pecuniary liability ; 

(b) to mortgage, charge, lease or alienate the 
Estate or any part thereof; 

(c) to grant valid receipts for the rents and 
profits arising or accruing therefrom. 

Rule VII. 

Within fifteen days from the date of his appointment 

the Manager shall publish in such 

Publication of notice manner ftg bQ mog(j effective a 

to claimants against . / 

Estate. notice in (jrujarati calling upon all 

persons having claims against the 
EsUte-holder or the Estate to present their claims in writing 



BSCUMBERBD ESTATES BULIS. 48 T 

to the Manager within three monttu from the date of the 
publication of the notice. He shall also cause copies of the 
notice to be posted up in the Thanadar's kaoheris in the 
district in which the Estate is situated. 

Rule VII I. 

Every claim so presented shall be in writing ; shall be 
explicit ; shall give all the particulars 
i mg o c a . within the cl uman's knowledge ; and 

shall, wherever practicable, be supported by every document 
upon which the claimant relies. The Manager miy refuse to 
accept documentary evidence not adduced with the statement 
of claim ab the time when it was presented. 

Rule IX. 

If the document relied on be an ent*y in any book, the 
claimant shall produce the book to the 
Entries in books. Manager , together with a copy of the 

entry. The Manager shall mark the book for the purpose 
of identification, and after eximining and comparing the "copy 
with the original and recording a certificate on the copy to 
that effect, shall return the book to the claimant, and ^ the 
certified copy shall be kept with the statement of the claim. , 

Rule X 

Every claim other than a claim by Government, not 

filed within the time and in the man- 

Effect of not filing nejp preS cribed in Rule VIII, shall be 

£ Wlthin PreSCribed deemed to have been duly discharge* 

and shall be for ever barred; 

Provided that it shall be within tin competence of the 

Manager to allow to any claimant a 

Extension of t'me. £ ur ther period of three months withia 

*hich he may satisfy the Manager that he l»i good and 

efficient reasons for n*t filing his claim within the prescribed 

jeriod. 



4$fc 7Xkm> KAKTHA b&fc^1?0Rf ; 

1 Every order for allowing an extension of time tinder 

this Rule shall be recorded by the Manager in writing and 

in the form of a proceeding showing his reasons for allowing 
the extension. 

When the Manager refuses to allow an extension of 
time under this rule, he shall record his reasons for such 
refusal in writing. 

Rule XI* 

When a claim has been duly presented, the Manager 

' . . , , . shall endorse the statement of claim in 

Enquiry into cjaims. ,. . .. _ . . 

his own handwriting and number it in 

its order of priority. As soon as the period within which 

claims may be presented has expired, the Manager shall, 

without delay, eoquire, in their due order so far as may be, 

or otherwise, as may best suit the public convenience, into 

all the claims that have been presented against the Estate. 

Rule XII. 
Subject to the provisions of Bale XX such enquiries 
' shall, it? all cases, be conducted in 

Mature p£ enquiry aocordan ce with the following princi- 
ples:—* 

A. — The first point to he ascertained, wherever 
possible, shall be the amount of the principal sum originally 
lejatf by .each, creditor. The history of each claim should be 
studied carefully and traced as accurately as possible with a 
^iew to obtaining such information. 

B. — When the Manager has satisfied himself as to 
the amount or approximate amount o£ the principal, he 
shall allow upon it 6 per cent simple interest pe? annum 
from the date of the loan to the date of the notification 
issued under Kule lit, &tid the aggregate sum so arrived 
at, and nothiug more, shall be the sttm awarded under these 
rules: provided that in no * casei shaft * the - amouufc of the 
interest awarded be in excess of the principal. ;■# 



ENCUMBERED ESTATES RULES. 4&9 

C — It, owing to the de6ciency of the income of the 
Estate, it cannot provide for' all debts or cannot pay the 
interest due at the prescribed rate within the aforesaid 
period of 20 years, such reduction shall be made (I) .in the 
rate of interest, and (2) in the admitted principal debt, as 
may be necessary for the proportional liquidation of all 
debts fh their several orders within the said spaoifiei period, 

2>— If it appear that the debt was incurred by th$ 
predecessor in title of the E3tate-holier without his concurrence 
and was not subsequently recognized by the Estate-holder, the 
claim shall be dismissed. 

Provided that in cases in which the Estate-holder is 
a minor, it shall rest with the Political Agent or Superin- 
tendent to recognize any debts which may seem to hinf* 
reasonable. 



Rule XIII. 



u* 



If it appear that the interest already received by any 

' . _ . _ . claimant amounts to double the prinot- 

Dismiasal 01 claim. > 

■ ■ pal, or the principal plus 6 per oeotu 

compound interest, the claim shall be dismissed. . 

Rule XIV. 

Subject to the above general principles, the investigation 

and settlement of all points of detail 

Procefdtire. ghall resfc w i b k the Manager, tjie 

procedure to be followed shall, as nearly as may be convenient** 
be the procedure followed by Civil Courts in adjudiQ'iting 
upon civil claims. But the Manager will always h We 
considerably more latitude than a Civil Court in dealing, 
with evidenoa; as, for instance, in going bebind bonds for 
the purpose of ascertaining what sums were really 'advanced 
to the Estate-holdey< ,>,_,...., 
62 



4$0 BBWA KAtfTHA DIRECTORY. 

Rule XV. 

Subject to the provisions of Rule XX, th9 Manager 

. will carefully investigate the real merits 

mernrof g claim.° of every claim and satisfy himself that 

where a debt appears to be for value 

received, value really was received: and that where a debt 

appears to be for service rendered, the service was rendered 

and was equivalent to the money value sought to be 

I recovered. 

Rule XVI 

It shall be within the competence of the Manager to 

refuse to award interest in any case 

JRefusal to award w fon fa finds that the accounts are not 

interes it aecounts m ■■ 

unsatisfactory. satisfactory. When the advance of the 

principal cannot be satisfactorily traced, 
a deduction of 50 per cent, is to be made from the amount 
«f the debt as it appears at the time when first there is 
satisfactory proof of it. 

Rule XVII. 

In absence of a provision for in- 
No interest payable 
in absence of express terest, no interest shall be allowed, 
provision, 

Fide XV1IT. 

All payments made by the Estate-holier to the 

cUimaut, or profits, which have been 

^allowance of inter- en j y e d hy such creditor towards the 

«t m cert am oases* ,. . , . i. . , •.,.•• . » 

liquidation of any debt or liability, ahall 

be deducted from the principal sum of the debt or liability, 
mad interest) on an amount eqial to such dedaoni sum shall 
h$ disallowed from the time of suca paymeit or enpyrmnt, 
and the Manager shall be empowered to decide on the 
amount of profits realized under such enjoyment after 
examining such proof* as are presented to him. 



BNCUMBEBBD ESTATES OTM5S. *£*' 

Rule XIX. 

The Manager may, with the previous sanction of 

the Political Agent or Political Super- 

Appointment of tbe i nten d ent> appoint, which such rates of 
Committee ot the .Ln- . 

quiry. remuneration as may be reasonable, a 

Committee of three native gentlemen 

of experience, two at least of whom shall not be in the 

service of the Agency, to assist the Manager in deciding 

what claims are admissible and to what amount under these 

Rules. Any expenditure incurred under this Rule shall be 

deemed to be a part of the expenses of management. 

Rule XX. 

In any case where debts have been awarded against 

the Estate-holdai by the decree of a 

?° c °S ni * ioD o£decree competent Civil Court before the Estate 
of Civil Court. it!*! i_ * 

was declared to be an encumbered 

Estate, the Manager shall accept the decree as conclusive 

proof of the amount therein awarded : 

Provided that— 

L— The Manager shall be empowered, if he had 
reasonable ground for believing that the amount decreed 
is more than twice the amount nli the original debt, to 
go behind the decree and enquire into the history of the 
transaction, with liberty to reduce the amount of the 
claim to such sum as will represent the original debt, 
plus interest thereon to an equal amount, minus any 
sums paid on account, in satisfaction either of principal 
or interest. 

II — The Manager sh*ll be empowered, in preparing 
the liquidation scheme under rule XVIII, to reduce the 
decretal amount in conformity with a general rateable 
reduction of all debts due by the Estate-holder. 

Ill— The Manager ethall likewise be empowered to 
reduce thfe rate, of interest awarded by the^ Court which 



«t$ BEWA KiNTHA DlRBC^rORY. 

made the decree to the same general rate of interest as 
'■'•» is allowed by Rule XII. 

Rule XXI. 

Debts shall be liquidated in order of 
Liquidation o£ debts. priority subject to the following 

provisos : — 

(a) Debts secured on the Estate shall take pre- 
cedence of all debts not so secured. 

{b) Decreed debts shall take precedence of bonded 
and account debts. 

(c) Bonded debts shall take precedence of account 
debts. 

(2) Provided also that all debts shall be liable, in case 
of necessity, to rateable reduction under Rule XII, Clause C. 

Rule XXII. 

In dealing with all claims against an encumbered 

Estate, the Manager shall be guided 

Application of Limi- b the Limitation Law, if any, and 

tation Lfrw and Regis- J '"'«•■' V / 

fetation Rules. the Registration Rules, if any, for the 

(| , time being in force in the Agency or 

Soperintendency Courts, so far as they may be applicable. 

Rule XXIII. 

As soon as the total amount of debts and liabilities 
has been finally ascertained, the Manager 
•Liquidation ScW " shall, without delay, prepare and submit 
to the Political Agent or Political Superintendent a schedule 
*f such debts and liabilities in the order in which it is 
proposed «to pay them off, and a scheme to be called '' the 
liquid at it n Scheme," Rhowing the manner in which it is 
proposed to pay and discharge the said debts and liabilities 
poi of the available revenues of the Estate, after making 
provision for ail -expenses incidental to the management 



ENCUMBERED JESTAtES fcULfeS. 4$$ 

including the payment} of Government tribute and other dues, 
charges for establishment, repairs and improvements, allowance 
for the maintenance and education of members of the Estate- 
holder's family, and for necessary ceremonial observances. 

Rule XXIV. 

The Political Agent or Political Superintendent m*.y 

thereupon, immediately, or after such 
Sanction and ptibli- r ., , ,. 

cation o£ Scheme. farth9r enquiry as he may direct, sanction 

the Liquidation Scheme in the form of 
which he finally approves. And the Political Agent or 
Superintendent shall thereupon, without delay, publish the 
Liquidation Scheme in the mo t effective manner with a 
notification that he has sanctioned it. 

Rule XXV. 

The effect of such public notification shall be tc 

extinguish finally all debts other than 
Effect of notification. „ ^ . _ , , ,, ^ , . '*■ 

Government dues owed by the Estate- 
holder ; and every claimant shall be entitled to receive 
under the Liquidation Scheme the amount (if any) finally 
awarded to him therein, in resp90t of his claim, and nothing 
more. V 

Provided, however, that if the condition of the Estate 
shall at any subsequent period during the management b* 
found sufficiently prosperous to justify payments considerably 
larger than those awarded in liquidation of debts, nothing 
in these Rules shall be deemed to debar the Political A^ent 
or Political Superintendent from making a sappiemeatwy 
awarded on the general principles hereinbefore approved. 

Rule XXVI. 

The Manager shall be empowered to require any 

mortgagee in possession pf any part oC 

R<*overy rf mort* ftQ ^ cumbert d Estate to deliver up Ms 

gage property. possession to the Manager *t the otosfe 

of the revenue year daring ^htoh the Bkate oime tlndir 



494 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY, 

these Rules, and on failure of the mortgagee so to surrender 
possession, to summarily evict him, or any person obstructing 
or resisting on his behalf, from the said portion of the 
encumbered Estate. 

Nothing in this Rule shall be held to affect the right 
of such mortgagee to receive under the liquidation scheme 
the amount (if any) awarded to him. 

Rule XXVIL 

If the Estate-holder dies after his Estate has been 
declared to be an encumbered Estate 

Death q£ Estate- an( j before the management has termi- 
Jbolders. . . 

nated. all claims against the estate shall 

be extinguished except debts due to Government or incurred 

with the sanction of Government or, where the successor to 

such Estate-holder is a mino*, such other debts as the 

^Political Agent or Superintendent may recognize as 

ireaflonable. 

Rule XXVIII. 

An appeal from any act dene or order mad* by the 

Mac age r shall lie within six weeks to 

Appeal against Mana- the p olitioal A„ eilt 01? Political 

ger's act or order. f> 

T. Superintendent, and the order passed on 

€ach appeal shall be final. 

Rule XXIX. 
The Manager shall be assisted by a sufficient establish- 
ment of auditors, submanagers and 

Establishment o£ other subordinates, and may depute to 

auditors and others. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ Polibieal 

Agent or Political Superintendent may determine: Provided 
tfyat alll such subordinates as may be entrusted with the 
eoUection or custody of money shall furnish adequate security. 
The ;Estate-ho\der or any member of his family shall, with 
the .PoU-tiepd Agent's or Political^ Superintendent's sanction, 
bp.^igibl% for employment under this Rule. 



ENCUMBERED ESTATES BULBS. 495 

Rule XXX. 

Every Manager appointed under these rales and every 

subordinate of such Manager shall be 
Manager and subordi- deem9( j fco bQ M ; SQrvaafc wifch j n 

nates deemed to be r 

"public servants". the meaning of the Indian Penal Code. 

Manager's proceedings And every i nve8 tigation conducted be- 

deemed to be judi- • m ° 

cial proceedings. fore a Manager m respect to any claim 

preferred under these Rules, or to any 

matter connected with such claim, shall be deemed to be a 

judicial proceeding within the meaning of the Indian Penal 

Code. 

Rule XXXI. 

No suits or other proceeding shall 

Suit barred in respect be maintained against any person in 
of bona fide act under c ,. , , ,. * _^ 

yjj^ ■ respect of anything done by mm bona 

fide in pursuance of these Rules. 

Rule XXXII. 

For the purpose of any inquiry tinder these Rules th& 
Manager may summon and enforce th& 

Summoning o! witaes- attendance of witnesses, and mw com- 
ses and production ot . . ' . ' -V" ' % • » 

evidence. P 6 * them to give evidence, and oompel 

the production of documents and 

accounts by the same means, and as far as possible in th* 

same manner, as is provided in the case of a Civil Court by 

the Code of Civil Procedure. 

Rule XXXIIL 

Nothing in these Rules shall exclude the jurisdiction 

of the Agency or Supermtendency 

Saving o£ jwdiotioo,- Coarbs ia 8uit8 re ^ t i og to the succession 

ct Agency and Super- , 

intency of Courts. to or to a co-parcenary interest in any 

Estate to which those Rales have beea 
applied: Provided that in all auoh suite the M*nag r of fch><* 



* 9 f K«WA KA.NTH4 piBBCTORT., . 

8aid immoveable property shall-- be made a party to the suit, 
and that no Court shall entertain any such suit without 
the sanction of the Political Agent or Political. Superintendent 

Rule XXXIV. 

During the period of management the Manager shall 

. ordinarily exercise the same powers in 

Manager Wers ° respect to the encumbered Estate as the 

Estate-holder formerly exercised. He 
shall conduct the management under the control of the 
Political Agent or Political Superintendent and will in all 
cases submit for his information and approval such estimates, 
accounts and other returns as the Political Agent or 
Superintendent may require. 

Mute XXXV. 

At $ny time before he has sanctioned a liquidation 

scheme under Rule XXIV, the Politi- 

m^met^ * eal Agent or Superintendent may 

publicly notify that on a date fixed by 
such notification the management shall be relinquished. 
On the date so fixed- 
fa) the management shall terminate; 

' (p) the owner of the property under management 

shall be restored to the possession thereof subject to any 
r leases made; 

(c) any residue of the rents and profits of the said 
property shall be paid to him; and 

(d) the proceedings processes, execution and attach* 
ments stayed and suspended under Rules V and X and 
the debts and liabilities barred by Rule X shall revive. 

In calculating the periods of limitation applicable to 
teuite tcr recover and enforce debts and liabilities revived under 
fbte tectum, the time during which the management has 
f «)WStou6# shall tor winded. * < ; --..x ;-■> 



ENCTJMBERED ESTATES RULES. , 4*£ 

Provided that this Rule is not applicable to/ and sha^B 
not be applied to, any Estate in ihe 

P KattL a and Slht ReWa Kantha Agency; and that nothing 

Kantha A9encies. in this Rule shall render any tribute* 

paying Estate in the Mahi Kantha 

Agency liable to any proceedings, processes, executions, or 

attachments to which it would not otherwise be liable. 

Rule XXXVI 

When the debts and liabilities mentioned in the liquid* 
ation scheme have been paid and dis- 

Termination of charged as therein provided, or 

management. 

extinguished undtr Rule XXVII, the 

Political Agent or Superinten lent as the case may be, shall, 

unless the Estate-holder (or his successor in interest) is then 

a minor, upon a report from the] Manager, publish a notion 

fixing a date for the termination of the management In 

cases in which the Estate-holder (or his successor in interest) 

is a minor, the date to be fixed* for the termination of the 

management shall not be earlier than that to which the 

minority will terminate. 

Rule XXXVII. 

On the date so fixed the management shall terminate 
and the Estate-holder (or his successor 
Restoration oE Estate in i nter est) shall be restored to the 
to Estate-holder. ... • i . -n 

possession and enjoyment ot his instate. 



Encumbered Estates —Life interest of Talukdars. 

NOTIFICATION- 

> The Political Agent, Rewa Kantha, hereby notifies to 
the public that the tributary Chiefs and Taiukdars of Rewa 
Kantha having only a life interest in their States or Talukas, 
with clebt# beyond their, lifetime* Therefore the ruje^t^t^j. 
any debts incurred by predecessors of ruling Chfofa or,^i(^tefj£.; 
63 



458 BSWA KAWTHA DIRECTOR*. 

Talukdars ( including their share holders ) without their con- 
currence and not recognized ^subsequently by them or sanc- 
tioned by the Political Agent's written order will not be 
recognized by the Agency Courts — should be strictly followed. 

It is further notified that the Agency Courts are not 
to interfere in cases regarding monetary transactions between 
Ruling Chiefs and jurisdictional Talukdars and their creditors. 

Therefore claims against such Chiefs or Talukdars 
regarding monetary transactions will not be entertained in 
any Agency Court without obtaining the Political Agent's 
orders beforehand. 

Dated 20th March 1899. 

W. DODERET, 
Political Agent, Rewa Kantha. 



Encumbered Estates— Written consent of the heir necessary 
for recogntion of debts of deceased Talukdars. 

No. 1690 of 1854. 

NOTICE. 

In pursuance of Home Government Despatch No. 13 
dated 27th April 1854 A. D. to the Right Honourable the 
Governor in Council of Bombay, regarding the payment of 
debts of those Ttlukdirs and Japtidars whos3 estates are 
attached and taken into Japti on any account, the B >mbay 
Government in its order No. 3592. dated 9bh August, 
directs that the debts on the estates, that come under 
Government attachment, will be recognised for payment only 
when the creditor* will produce the written consent of the 
heir of the deceased Talukdars below the signature of the 
Talukdar and tor incurriug the debts. 

Para 75' of the despatch is republished here from the 
Kathiawar Directory, See Agency Notification No. 28 of 
4th Octoter 1892. 



ENCUMBERED ESTATES. - 4*9 



f{ 75. On the whole we are of opinion that when the 

financial affairs of these petty States 

t^SjJ^oi^ come under your control, you should 

Honourable Court o£ not recognise any debts incurred by 

^tp^ins'sfreS P redece8SOr8 of ' he ™ V ™2 Chief without 
ed with Government his concurrence and not subsequently 

letter No. 3590 dated reC0 gnized by himself. 
9th August 1854. & J 

We also think that this rute 
should be made generally known, and that it should be held 
strictly and invariably applicable to all debts contracted 
after the is^ue of the notification debbs previously contracted 
remaining subject to the rules now in foroe. 



No. 1398 of 1856. 
NOTIFICATION. 

It is hereby notified to the public that in pursuance 
of the Home Government Resolution No. 13 dated 27th 
April 1854, Notification No. 1690 dated 1st September 
1854 was published with reference to this letter No, 5701 
dated 19fch December 1856 from Government has now been 
received, whereupon it is notified that, if any person makes 
a claim here on debt due by any deceased chief or Talukdar 
or Jagirdar, his claim will be recognized only if the heir to 
the deceased debtor has signed the agreement of debt in 
token of consent and admits his liability to pay the same. 
But without the aquiescenoe of the heir no claim will be 
admitted by the Sarcar. 

Dated 24th December 1856. 



Encumbered Estates~Z«/i? Interest of Taluhdars. 

NOTIFICATION. 

The Political Agent, Rewa Kan&ha, hereby n}tifies to 
the public that the tributary Chiefs and Taiukdars of Rewa 
Kantha having only a life interest in their States or Taluka^ 



3W0 BEWA KANTHA BIKECTORY. 

*ith debts beyond their life time. Therefore the rule that 
any debts incurred by predecessors of ruling Chiefs or tribu- 
tary Talukiars (including the shareholders ) without their 
i&ncurrence and not recognized subsequently by them or 
sanctioned by the Political Agents written order will nob be 
iecognized by the Agency Courts, should be strictly folbwed. 

It is further notified that the Agency Courts are not 
*o interfere in cases regarding monetary transactions between 
iraling Chiefs jurisdictional Talukdars and their creditors. 

Therefore claims against such Chiefs or Talusdars 
regarding monetary transactions will not be entertained in 
any Agenoy Court without obtaining the Political Agent's 
orders beforehand. 

Dated 20th March 1899. 

W. DODERET, 

Political Agent, Rewa Kantha, 



European British subjects— Criminal trials. 

Political Department* 
Bombay Castle 23rd April 1913. 

No. 2577. — The following Notification by the Govern- 
ment of India, Foreign Department is republished for 
general information: — 

No. 853 I B. dated SixU 16th April 1913. 
In exerci&e of the powers conferred by the Indian 
High Courts Act, 1865 (28 and 29 Victoria Gap. 15) and 
m supercession of the Notification of the Government of 
India, in the Foe:gn Department No. 1785, dated 23rd 
♦September 1874, as subsequeatly amended, except in so far 
as it relate to B^rar and to the P*rgana3 of ToJg*rh, Davair, 

c 

Saroth Chang and Kot Karana in Merwara, the Governor 
Ofeneral in Council is pleased to direct that original and 
appellate criminal jurisdiction over European British subjects 



EUROPEAN BRITISH SUBJECTS. 5&1 

of his Majesty, being Christians, resident within the territories 
save the portions aforesaid of the States of India named 
below shall until the Governor Gaoeral in Council otherwise 
orders be exsrcised by the High Court of judicature 
established at Port William, Madras Bombay and AlUhabad 
respectively as follows : — 



By the High Gourt at Bombay. 

Baroda. 

Hyderabad. 

States in Central India. 

,, in Rajputana. 

„ under the political control of the Governor of 
Bombay. 

The Makrai State. 

LATE NOTIFICATIONS. 

Political Department, 

Bombay castle 13th February 1911. 

No. 1193.— The following notifications by tie Govern- 
ment of India, Fore go and Political Department i3 republished:- 
" No. 319 D dated Delhi, the 16th January 1917. 

In exercise of the powers conferred by the Indian 
( Foreign, Jurisdiction ) order in. Council, 190 Z, and of all 
other powers enabling him in that behalf, and in supsrsession 
of the notification of th3 Governmanb of Inlia in ; fehe 
Foreign Department No. 680 I, B dated the 19th March 
1912, the Governor General in Council is pleased to direct:- 

(1) that any European British Subject appointed 
either by name or virtue of his office to be a justice of 
the Peace in or for any country or any palce beyond 
the limits of British India shall have, in regard to 
European British subjects and peraoas or accused of 



502 BBWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

having committed offences jointly with Etropean British 
subjects all the powers of a Magistrate of the 1st Class 
under the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1908 (ST of 1898), 
and in addition all powoas under sections 186 and 190 
cf the said Code; — 

(2) that any European British Subject appointed 
either by name or virtue of his office to be a justice of 
tho Peace in or for any country or place beyond the 
limits of British India, shall have powers to hold inquests 
under sections 174 of said Code;-- 

(3) that the person for the time being discharging 
the duties of the District Magistrate of Banglore, 
appointed under the Code of Criminal Procedure as 
applied to that place in the modified form specified in 
the second entry in the second column against item 59 
of the schedule to the notification ot the Government of 
India in the Foreign and Political Department No. 318 
D. dated the 16fch January 1917, shall have in regard 
to European British subjects, all the powers of a 
District Magistrate under the Code of Criminal Procedure 
as applied to that place by the fir3b entry in the 
second column against item 59 of the said schedule of 
the said notification. 

REGISTRATION OP BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

No. 4227-1. dated the 31st October, 1889.— la 

modification of Foreign Department Notifisatioa No. 340.1 

dated the 25th January, 1#89, the Governor General ia 
Council is pleased to is3ue the following : — 

I. In exercise of the powers conferred by Section 13 
of the Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act, VI 
of 1886, the Governor General in Council is pleased to 
appoint the persons, for the time being, holding the offices 
designated in the first column of the following schedule to 



CHBISTIAH MABIBAGJfiS. 50& 

be Registrars of Birth3 and deaths, ia respect of ths classes 
of persons indicated In Section If, Sab-Section (1), clause 
(b), of the said Act, for the local areas mentioned opposite 
their designations in the second column of that schedule, 
respectively ; — 



II. Rewa Kantha. 
The Political Agent. 



The States within 
the Agency. 



II. For the purpose of Section 24, Sub-Seotioa (2), and 
Section 32 of the said Act. the Governor General in Council 
is further pleased to appoint the Registrar General of 
Births, Deaths and Marriages for tna Presidency of Bombay, 
for the time beijg, to be the Ragistrar General for the local 
areas mentioned in the schedule above. 

CHRISTIAN MARRIAGES. 

Under Government Resolution No 22 of the 24th 
April 1901 Political Officers in charge Native States, who 
are also Marriage Registrars for those States, are to bear 
in mind that Section I. of the Indian Christian Marriage 
Ast, 1872, extends the Act), so for only as regards Christian 
subjects af His Majesty, tj the territories of Native Princes 
and States in alliance with His Majesty. A license granted 
by Government under the \.ct to ministers of Religion and 
other Christians to solemnize marriages or to grant oertiEioites 
of marriages in these territories W3uld refer o lly to m images 
there between Christian subjects of His Majesty. 

Fees leviable by Marriage Registrars and Rates for 
the disposal thereof. 

No. 1586 E. dated 29 uh August, 1892— In exsreisa 
of the powers conferred by Section 84 of the Indian Jhristian 
Marriage Aot, (XII of 1872 ), the Governor General ia 



504 REWA KANTHA. PIRECTOBY, 

Council is pleased, so far as Christian subjects of Her 
Majesty within the territories of the Native Princes or States 
in India for the tinae being in alliance with Har Majesty 
(excepting the Native States, which are situate within or 
border on the Presidencies of Fort St. Gaorgs and Bombay, 
but including the territories of His Highness the Maharaja 
o£ Mysore and those administered by the Agant to the 
Governer General in Baluchistan as such Agent), to fix the 
following scale of fees to be charged under the Act> and to 
make the following rules in regard to the disposal of such 
fees :— 

Scale of Fees. 

Rs. A. P. 

1. For receiving each notise of mar- 

»i»^e« ••• ... ••• •»« ••• ... ... jl^™*1/ ""if 

2. For publishing each notice of mar- 
riage. 20—0—0 

3. For the issuing of each certificate of 
marriage by a Marriage Registrar... 5 — 0—0 

4. For registering eaah 'marriage by a 
Marriage Registrar 3—0 

5. For entering each protest against or 
prohibition of the issue of a marriage 
certificate by a Marriage Registrar ...10—0 

6. For searching marriage register books 
or certificates or duplicates or copies 
thereof for a period of not more than 
one year, or in the case of a search 
of the register:books or certificates 

prescribed under section 37,61, and 62, 
for ap period of not piore than two 
■ •. • y*? a ? s \ ••• « ••• ••• ••• ••• ••• s ... 1-nQ— , ; . t 

< ,jf,,. For every additional year ... ... ... 0—4—0 < 



EXPLOSIVES. 

8. For granting a copy of any entry in 
marriage register-books or certificates 
or duplicates or copies thereof under 
sections 63 and 79. .„ ... 1 — 0-0 

Rules. 

I. Fees levied by Marriage Registrars being Gov- 
ernment Servants, must, until further notice, be paid into 
the Government treasury, and shall be credited to " Provin- 
cial Services " or in such other manner as may be directed 
by the Government cf India. Marriage Registrars, who 
are niot Goverximei^t Servants, are permitted to retain far 
their own use, any fees which they may receive under the 
first part o£ this notification. 

II. The fees chargeable under the first part of thi^ 
notification shall not be kvied when the parties concerned 
are officers or others in the Military or Naval services of 
Her Majesty. 

III. Marriage Registrars are authorized to remit any 
portion, not exceeding three-fourths of the fees in cases in 
which they may consider the parties unable to pay such fees 
in foil. 



Explosives — Rules for the transport and report of — 

NOTIFICATION. 

No. 1555 of 1903. 

Godhra, 18th August 1903. 

Under instructions from Government, the following 
rules relating to the transport and importation of explosives » 
in the Thana Circles under this Agency are published for* 
general information. ■ »■ .. 

Similar rules have been adopted by the Jurisdictional 
States for their territories. * ,: '' ' <■ . 

,:ic(,t " u 1, "• : N,: y ' 'Gk CARMimiAELy ' <• ''^ 

Political Ag&d' i>,; 

64 



&96 S8WA KAWTBA DIBBCTQPY. 

JRufcf to regulate the transport and importation of Explosive* 
in the Thana Circles of the Sankheda and Pandu Mewa* 
(including the Peta Bhag of Dodkz) and Jambughoda. 

1. " Explosives " include the following : — Gunpowder, 
ammunition, fireworks, blasting powder and any dangerous 
and chemically prepared substance which easily takes fire 
and which explodes. 

2. An explosive under transport shall be closed in a box, 
a cask, a dabba or a bag that the vessel may not break or 
accidentally break open in transit and the substance may not go 
out and prove dangerous. For this purpose the vessel shall be 
a wooden or a metallic box or a box made of any other 
substance, a cask or a dabba in accordance as the necessity 
of the case may require. 

3. Explosives of different kinds shall be packed 
separately. Substances which by being packed together may 
take fire shall not be packed together. 

4. Gun-powder, ammunition, blasting powder and powder 
for fireworks shall not exceed 100 lbs in a single package, 
and any other chemically prepared substance 50 lbs. 

5. The package shall bear on it the word €i explosive" 
tbe name of the substance, the name and address of the 
owner, and the consigner, or a label with the same statement 
shall be affixed on it. 

6. W hen explosives are to be conveyed ia a boat or a 
er iage, proper c*re should be takei l*t they should take 
fire. A lamp, tire, matches or any such substance shall not 
be kept near the explosives. Even smoking shall nob be 
done, eUe the explosives mty take fire. But if necessity 
for lamp arises, one in a strong lantern shall be made use 
of from a reasonable distance. In short every precaution 
against the explosives taking fire and for the protection shall 
bt taken* 



KPL08IVK SUBSTANCES ACT. *0T 

7. Explosives shall not be transported without being 
packed in the aforementioned manner and care and precaution 
must be taken against their taking fire. Whoever shall break 
the abovementioned rule of transport of explosives shall be 
liable to a fine which may extend to Rs. 100. 

8. Whoever wishes to import explosives in the limits 
of the Thana Circles of the Sankheda and Pandu Mewas 
(inoluding the Peta Bhag of Dodka and Jambughoda) shall 
obtain a license under tha Rules and Regulations. If imported 
without a proper license they shall be liable to be confiscated. 
Similarly an explosive shall be sold without a license. A 
fee of Rs. 10 shall be charged for every license covering 200 
lbs. and over. A fee ef Rs. 5 shall be charged for every 
license covering 100 lbs. and under. 

Provided that no license shall be required for the 
import of explosives upto 10 lbs., if the quantity so imported 
be solely for the private use of the importer and not for 
sale. 

9. A licenseholder shall keep a clear account and 
shall produce it when required by a Magistrate or a Police 
Officer or othor Government servant. 

10. Whoever shall import or sell explosives without 
a license or shall act in contravention of its conditions shall 
be liable to a fine which may extend to Rs. 100. 

G. CARMIOHAEL 
Political Agent, Rewa Kantha; 



<^>"^> 



$08 HEW A KANTHA DIMBCTOBY. 

EXPLOSIVE SUBSTANCES ACT 1908. 

, No. 5702.— dated the 25 ; th August 1908 — Iq exercise 
of the powers delegated under the Indian ( Foreign Jurisdic- 
tion) order in Council 1902, by the Governor General in 
Council in the notification of the Government of India in 
the Foreign Department No. 2859 I. A datad the 19th 
June 1903 the Governor in Council b pleased to apply the 
Explosive substances Act, 1908, (VI of 1908), to all places 
within which the Governor in Council is authorized to make 
rules and orders by tie said notification, including the Thana 
circles and the Civil station, the cintonments of Deesa (and 
Bhuj), and the lands occupied by Railways, which are 
referred to in the notifications of the Government of India 
in the Foreign Department Nos. 1082 I. B. and 1083 I. B. 
dated the 2nd March 1900. 

Provided that all references to British India in the 
said act shall be read as including all the places to which 
the act is hereby, or may hereafter be applied. 



s$r 



EXTRADITION BULBS. 509 

Extradition, Rules, 

No. 5285. 

Political Department* 

Bombay Castle, 22nd August 1873 r 
Letter from the Resident at Baroda No 128-648, 
dated 18th July 1873 Submitting a MemDrandum of an 
attempt to meet the want of authoritative direction in the 
variety of extraditional cases which arisa between Baroda 
and the neighbouring States &c; suggesting that a precis 
of the Government orders on such cases be drawn up for 
the information and guidance of all the neighbouring British 
authorities. 

Resolution: — The principal alteration of the former Law 
of Extradition effected by Act XI of 1872 is that in the 
event of a person charged with committing a crime in a 
Native fctate escaping into British territory, the duty of 
determining whether there is a prima facie case against him 
is placed on the Political Agant, attached to the Native 
State in which the crime has, been committed, instead o£ on 
the British British Magistrate before whom the accused is 
brought. The Political Agent is empowered to issue . a 
Warrant for the apprehensioa of the accused, and the 
British Magistrate within whose jurisdiction the acousoi is 
found has nothing to do bat to exsoute the Political Agents 
Warrant. 

2. This principle may be very advantageously introduced 
into the procedure which regulates the surrender of criminals 
between the Native States under this Government. As h 
general Rule, the Political Agent attached to the State 
where the offence is committed can examine the case more 
satisfactorily, and with less inoonvenienoa to tie witnesses, 
than the Political Agent attached to the possibly distant 
etate into which the accused may have taksn refuse. 



510 REWA KANTHA DIRECTOR?. 

3. According to the present procedure, a State 
requiring a surrender from another State has, through 
its own Political Agant, to submit a prima facie case which 
shall satisfy the Political Agant of the other State and the 
other State itself. It should now be laid down that it will 
be sufficient for the Political Agent of the State where the 
offence has been committed to certify that a prima facie case 
has been made out, and it will be the duty of the Political 
Agent of the State in which the accused has taken refuge to 
cause the accused to be apprehended through the Native State, 
and surrendered without any inquiry, either on the part of 
himself or the Native State, into the merits of the case. 

4. (Cancelled.) 

0. GONNE, 
Secretary to Government. 



No. 5557. 

Political Department. 
Bombay Castle, 9th September 1873. 

Read the following letter from the District Magistrate, 
Ahmedabad, No. 1183, dated the 25th August 1873:— 

" I have the honour to enquire whether the orders 
contained in the second sentence of paragraph 3 of Govern- 
ment Resolution No. 5235, dated 22nd instant, apply to 
District Magistrate?. 

"2. 1 assume they do, and that in future, it will be 
sufficient for the Magistrate of a District where an offence 
has been committed to certify that a prima facie case has 
been made out, and. it will be the duty of the Political 
Agent of the State in which the accused has taken refuge 
to, cause the accused to be apprehended through the Native 
State and surrendered without any enquiry oa the part of 
himself or of the Native State into the merits of the case. 



EX»ADlTI<m RULES. 5il 

4 The one exception in paragraph 4 will ofcourse 
-apply equally to District Magistrate's demands for extra- 
dition. 

Resolution.— The orders contained in Governmsnt 
Resolution No. 5235 of 22nd August last, applied only to 
cases where a demand for extradition is made by one State 
on another, but as Mr. Bo.r*dai!e suggescs, they should be 
considered equally applicable to cases where the extradition 
is demanded by a District Magistrate from a Native State. 

C.GONNE, 

Secretary to Government. 

Note. — These orders have been commented on and 
explained in G. R No. 2939 of 27oh April 1888 and No. 
6940 of 19th October 1888, and Government have held in 
G. R. No. 7160 of 29th October 1839 th*t although the 
Extradition Act and Rules thereunder ( printed infra ) are 
framed to regulate extradition between British and Foreign 
territory, the principles therein laid down are to be held 
applicable to oases arising between Native States. 

2. As to the question whether extradition bat ween 
two Native States can be demanded for other offences than 
thos9 scheduled under the Act, it has been held tint the 
authoritative intervention of tha Political Agjeat is limited 
to the procedure to be followed by the spirit of tin term* of 
Seotion II of the Extradition Aot, on th9 analog/ of which 
he acts. A9 the Act, however, is n>fc stristl/ applicable to 
extradition as batwecn two Native State*, and as there is a 
fairly general practice already in existence of granting 
extradition in cases not within ttie schedule, the surrender of 
*nch persons continues so long as the Stated themselves agree 
to the practice. If objections are raised, they are sp cially 
considered. 



512 RBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

- ' < No. 3479/ 

Political Department, 
Bombay Castle, 20th June 1874. 

letter from the Political Agent in Kathiawar, No. 214, dated 
25th May 1874— Submitting papers on the question 
whether a Political Officer can serve a warrant or process 
of a British Court within the limits of a foreign State in 
which he has no jurisdiction) concurring in the view taken 
that the Political Officer should act in his diplomatic 
capacity ; and suggesting a definite riding on the point t 
Adding that Major Watson has been directed to address 
the State concerned diplomatically and have the accused 
person surrendered. 

Resolution.— The view stated is undoubtedly correct. 

2. When a British Magistrate finds a prima facie 
case against an accused person being in a Foreign State, 
he should move the Political Agent by letter to procure his 
arrest. He may send a warrant at the same time, but that 
would be only to justify the detention of the accused after 
he has once been arrested and made over to the Magistrate's 
Police. > 

O. GONNE, 
Secretary to Government. 

Extf Edition— Treatment of accused persons. 

Political Department. 
GOVERNMENT CIRCULAR LETTER. 

Bombay Castle, dated 17th November 1874. 

No. 6787 

1 am directed ! by H. E. th^ Governor in Council to> 
state For your guidance that when a Political Agent acts 
on behalf of a Native State in making' a surrender, he 
should take care that the safeguards prescribed for* case* 
governed by British Law are duly attended * g to and in any 



Extradition rules. A 513 

case of surrender by a Political Agent, it h his duty to 
observe the treatment which the surrendered person may 
receive, with a view, if necessary, to remonstrance. 

2. ( Cancelled as per Government Circular No. 3672 
of 21st May 1875). 

No. 5342. 

Political Department, 
Bombay Castle, 16th September 1876. 

Letter from the Political Superintendent, Palanpur No. 
340, dated 2nd June 1876, stating, with reference to 
Government Resolution No. 3112 of 1876 that the 
question submitted by him in his letter No. 285 of 1876 
refers to all cases of extradition obtained in any of the 
three ways detailed in paragraph 2 of the accompaniment 
to his above quoted letter, provided that there are no 
political reasons ag^iusfc it. Recapitulating the arguments 
used by the Special Assistant on the subject. 
Memorandum from the Under Secretary to the Government 
of India, Foreign Department, No. 88 J. dated 16th 
August 1876. Forwarding, for information, with reference 
to this Government letter No. 3830 of 1876, copy of 
the following Notification No. 87 J., dated the 16th 
ultimo, published by the Government of India in that 
Department: — 

€< In supersession of Rule No. 5 of the Rules under 
Act XI cf 1872 ( the Foreign jurisdiction and Extra- 
dition Act, 1872 ), published by Notification of this 
Department, No. 31 J., dated 12th March 1875, the 
Governor General in Council is pleased to prescribe the 
following : — 

" If the person surrendered under thp warrant of a 

Political Agent, issued under Section II, b9 not a British 

subject; or if, such person being a British subject, the 

Courts of the Stats, either by custom or by the express 

65 



^14 KEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

recognition of the Governor General in Council, try 

Native British subjects, surrendered to them by extradi- 
tion; and the Political Agant, after hearing the State* 
meat, if any, of the accused, and making such further 

inquiry as he may deem necessary, is still satisfied that 
there is a prima facie case against the accused, and that 
the charge is nob prompted by political motives, the 
Political Agent shall make over the accused to be tried 

by the ordinary Courts of the Sate in which the offence 
was committed, provided that the Courts o£ the State 
have, by custom or iecognition as aforesaid, power to 
inflict the punishment which may be inflicted under tha 
Indian Pen 1 Code for the offence with which the accused 
person is charged." 

Resolution. — Copy should b9 sent to the Political 

Superintendent, PaUnpur, with reference to his letter No. 
340, dated the 2nd June last, and to all Political Agents, 

who should be enjoined to record their procaedings under 
this amended Rule, in order that any statement the accused 
may make, or the facb of his declining to mike a statement* 
may be duly noted. The Political Agent's reasons for finally 

making or refusing to make an extradition should also ba 
recorded. 

C. GONNE, 

Secretary to Government. 

No. 5721. 

Political Department. 

Bombay Castle, 7th September 1887. 

RESOLUTION OF GOVERNMENT. 

With reference to paragraph 3 of this Departnnat 
XJircular No. 2930, dated I7ch May 187:2, the accompanying 
amended form of warrant should be forwarded tj all Political 

Officers with instructions to issue in future a proper warrant 
in this form whenever they t<*ke proceedings under rfectioa 

11 of Act XXI of 1879. 

W. Lee WARNER, 

Aoing Secretary to Government* 



EXTRADITION BULBS. 51$ 

To, 

The Magistrate of the District of {name of the District 
in ichich the accused person is believed to be\ 

Whereas [name of accused) of ( place of abode of accused) 
is accused of the offence of (here state the offence) committed 

at. ...... .....in the State of.. .you are hereby directed 

under the provisions of Section II of Act XXI of 1879, to 
arrest the said (name of accused) and to forward him in 
custody to (name of place in Native State) and there to 
deliver him to (name and designation of the officer appointed 
to reoeive the accused). Herein fail not„ Dated this..... #### 
day of. 

(Signature and Seal of Political Agent.) 



Extradition — Stolen property found in the possession of 
other persons. 

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA'S LETTER. 

Dated Fort William, 26th November 1902. 

No. 27 I. A. 

I am directed to refer to your letter No. 2686 dated 
the 1st April 1902 regarding a question raised by the 
Baroda Darbar with respect to the disposal of property 
which is the subject of a criminal offance CDmmitted in one 
jurisdiction and which is found in another jurisdiction with 
persons other than the accused, who claim to be the owner 
in virtue of a bona fide purchase. 

2. The Government o£ India are of opinion that no 
real distinction can be drawn between two classes of stolen . 
property, when produced for evidential purpose?, nimely 
property found with the accused or stolen proparty founJi 
in the possession of third parties. The practice obtaining 
in the adjoining Native States and British Districts thouid 
therefore be followed in the Baroda State, and all stolen 
property produced in evidence in regard to which an offenoa 



51& ':■ REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

appears to have been committed should be dealt with in 
accordance with the provisions of Sec. 51? of the Coda of 
Criminal Procedure by the Court trying the case. 

3. A copy of this letter is being communicated to 
the Resident, Baroda. 



Extradition — Conveyance and maintenance of accused persons 
and cattle — 1903. 

In modification of the orders contained in G. R: Nos. 
4034 and 7490 dated respactivaly the 3rd July and 30bh 
November 1894 and G. R, No. 5455 of 7tb September 189S 
the Governor in Council is pleasai to accept the proposal 
that in cases of extradition between the Baroda Sb%ba and 
British Districts of the Bo nbay Presidency the convjyanca 
and m lintmanc charges o£ aeoused persons and o£ cattle 
should be borne by the authorities making the surrender. 
The same procedure should be followed by Native States 
in the Bombay Presidency. 



Extradition ♦ — Rules. 

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA NOTIFICATION. 
No. 1862—1. A, dated the 13 th May 1904. 
In exercise of the powers conferrad by the Indian 
(Foreign Jurisdiction) Order in Council, 1902 and by sectioa 
22 of the Indian Extradition Act, 1903 ( XV of 1903 and 
in superse sion of all prerious rules on the same aubject, the 
Governor Gineral in Council is pletsed, with effect from the 
1st day of June, 1904, to make the following rules, namely; 

I. The Political Agent shall not issue warrant under 
Section 7 of the Indi* n Extradition Ajt, 1903 (hereinafter 
referred to as " the said Act"), in any case which is provided 
for T eaty, if the Stite concerned has exprassly stated thab 
it desires to abide by the procedure of the Treaty, nor any 
case in which a requisition for surrender ha3 been m*da by, 
•or on behalf of the State under seotiou 9 of the s*id Asx 



EXTRADITION RULES. 51J 

2. The Political Agant shall not issue a warrant 
smder section 7 of the said Act except ou a request preferrred 
to him in writiag either by or by the authority o£ the 
person for the time being administering the Executive 
Government of the State for which he is a Political Agent, 
or by any Court within such State which has been specified, 
in this behalf by tha Governor General in Council, or by 
the Governor of Madras or Bcmbay in Council as the case 
may be, by notification in the official Gazette. 

3 # If the accused person i3 a British subject, the 
Political Agent shall, before issuing a warrant under section 
7 of the said Act, consider whetner he ought not} to certify 
the case as one suitable for trial in British India, and he 
shall, instead of issuing such a warrant, so certify the case, 
if he is satisfied that the interests of justice and the 
communique of witnesses can be better served by the trial 
being held in British India. 

4. The Political Agent shall, in sli cases before 
issuing a warrant under Section 7 of the said Act?, satisfy 
himself by preliminary inquiry that there is a prima facie 
case against th9 accused person. 

5. (1) The Political Agent shall, before issuing a 

warrant under Section 7 of the said Acb. 
decide whether the warrant shall- provide for 
delivery of the accused persons, 

(a) to the Political Agent or to a British 
officer subordinate to the Political Agent* 
with a view to his trial by the Political 
Ag~nt, or 

(b) to an authority of ths State with a view 

to his trial by the State Courts. 

(2) Before coining to a decision the Political 
Agent shall take the following matters int:> 
consideration :— 



51ft KBWA KANTHA DIRKCTORY. 

(?) the nature of the offence charged ; 

{it) the delay and trouble involved in bringing 
the accused person before himself; 

(in) the judicial qualifications of the Courts of 
the State; 

(iv) Whether the accused person is a British 
subject cr not ; and if he is a British 
( other than European British ) subject, 
whether the Courts of the State, either 
by custom or by recognition, try sucfo 
British subjects surrendered to them; 
and 

(v) whether the Courts of the State have 
by custom or by recognition, power to 
inflict the punishment which may be 
inflicted under the Indian Penal Code for 
an offence similar to that with which the 
accused person is charged. 

6. Notwithstanding anything in rule 5, the Political 
Agent shall make the warrant provide for the delivery of the 
accused persons to himself (or to an officer subordinate to 
himself), or to an authority of the State concerned, as the 
case may be, if he is generally or specially instructed by the 
Governor General in Council to try an accused person 
himselt or to make him over for trial to the proper Court 
of such State. 

7. In the case of an accused person made over for trial 
to the Court of the State the Political Agent shall satisfy 
himself that the accused receives a fair trial, and th^t the 
punishment inflicted on conviction is not excessive or barbar- 
ous ; and, if he ik not so satisfied, he shall demand the 
restoration of the prisoner to his custody; pending the orders 
€>f the Governor General in Council. 



FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. 519 

8.* Accused persons arrested in British India on warrants 

Issued under Section 7 or Section 9 of the said Act shall be 
treated, as far a3 possihle, in the same way as persons under 
trial in British India. 

9. # A person sentenced to imprisonment by a Political 
Agent shall, if a British Subject, be conveyed no the most 
convenient prison uader British Administration, and shall 
there be dealt with as though he had been sentenced under 
the local law: 

Provided always that this rule shall nob be construed 
so as to give such person any right of appeal other than 
that allowed by the rules for the time being in force for 
regulating appeals from the dicisions of th3 Political Agent. 

30 .IF Nothing in these rules shall be held to ap^ly to 
areas in Native States under British Jurisdiction, in which 
the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1898 (Act V of 1398) is 
in force. 



FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. 

Notification. 
Fort William, the 24th January 1908. 

No. 305. I. C. — In exercise of the powers conferred by 
the Indian ( Foreign Jurisdiction ) Order in Cjuncil, 1902, 
And by section 22 of the Indian Extradition Act, 1903 
(XV of 1903), the Governor General in Council is pleased 
to direct that the following amendments shall be made in 
the rules published with the Notification of the Government 
of India in the Foreign Dapartnamfc No. 1862 I. A. dated 
the 13th May 1904, as amende! by Notification No. 1723T 
I.A. dated the 12th May 19j5, namely, 

* Remembered by notification no. 254 l.B. dated 26th January 
1912, the original rule 8 having been cancelled by Notification N«k 
3475 1.0. dated the 28th August 1908. 

f Added by Notification No. 254 LB. dated 26th January 191SL 



520 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

(1) In rule B and in the heading < f the fo m prescribed 
thereby, for the word <c half yearly " the words 
"annually " and annual respectively shall be substituded, 

(2) In the footnote to the above mentioned form for 

the word " half year " the word "year'' shall be 
substituted. 

L. W. DANE, 
Secretary to the Government of India* 



No. 254 1. B. 

Government of India. 

Foreign Department. 

NOTIFICATION. 

Calcutta, the 26th January 1912. 

In exercise of the powers conferred by the Indian 

(Foreign Jurisdiction) Order in Council, 1902, and of all 

other powers enabling him in that behilf, and by section 22 

of the Indian Extradition Acb 1903 ( XV of 1903 ), the 

Governor General in Council is pleased to direct that the 

following addition shall be made to the rules published with 

the Notification of the Government of India in the Foreign 

Department No. 1862 I. A. dated the 13th May 1904, as 

amended by the like Notification No. 3472 I.C. dated the 
28th August 1908, namely, 

" 10. Nothing in these rules shall be held to apply to 
areas in native states under British Jurisdiction, in 
which the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1898, (Act 
V of 1893) is in force." 

11. Existing Rules 9 and 10 shall be remembered 8 
and 9. 

G. of I. Notification No. 823 D of 25th March 1913. 
In rule 4, the words "or otherwise " shall be omitted. 

J. B. WOOD, 

Additional Secretary 
to the Government of India, 



EXTRADITION RULES. 521 

Extradition— ■ 

GOVERNMENT CIRCULAR 

Political Department. 

Bombay Castle, 31st August 1915. 

No. 5172. 

The attention of all Magistrates and Political Agents 
is drawn to the following points with reference to extradition 
for offenses under the Criminal Tribes Act III of 1911. 

2. Notification No. 3361 I. A. dated the 23rcl 
December 1898, at page 106 of Volume. VI of Macpherson*s 
British enactments in force in Native States, Third Edition 
runs as follows : — 

<l In exercise of the powers conferred -by Section II 
of the Foreign Jurisdiction and Extradition Act 185^ 
(XXI of 1879), the Governor General in Council » 
pleased to declare that a Political Agent may issue * 
warrant for the arrest and surrender of any person 
accused of having done in any State against the law of 
such State an act which would, if done in any part of 
British India where the Criminal Tribes Act, 1871 
(XX VII of 1871) is for the time being in force, have 
constituted an offence against any of the provisions of the 
latter Act." 

Although the two Acts mentioned in this Notification 
have both been superseded by later Acts, the effect of the 
Notification remains still in force in virtue of Sec. 24 o£ 
the General Clauses Act, 1897); and Native States are 
thus enabled to obtain the extradition from British India of 
persons accused of the commission of offences against the 
Criminal Tribes Act, 1911 i£ in force in the State, or 
against similar provisions contained in any other law in force 
in the State. 

S. The demands which may be made upon a Native 
State for the extradition of a person accused of an offence 

66 



$22 KEWA KANTHA BIRECTOBY. 

committed in British territory are not limited by any law 
and the surrender of a person accusal of an offence committed 
in British India, against the criminal Tribes Act, 1911, oan 
unless there are treaty provisions on an established practice 
to the contrary, be demanded from a Native State without the 
slightest impropriety, as that state would in the converse 
ease, be unable to obtain the surrender of such person from 
British India. 

*4. The proper procedure for obtaining extradition in 
ordinary cases within the Bombay 

^iT C 5557 PM3iden °y is for the British Magistrate 
dated 9th September to submit the papers establishing a 

1873 and No. l£*2 vr i ma f ac % e case against the accused to 

dated 1st March 1898 ^ J . _._ . ... 

and accompaniments. the District Magistrate who will then, 

if satisfied as to the existence of a 

prima facie case forward a certificate to that effect to the 

Political Agent concerned, accompanied by a warrant for 

the arrest of the accused. The Political Agent is there in 

a position to call upon the State concerned for the surrender 

of the accused. 

5. When the extradition of a Baroda subject from 

the Baroda State is required, the 

G Circular No. 258 evidence establishing a prima facie case, 
o£ 14-1-91 Political f . 5 * u ' ^ * 

Department. ** n d not merely a certificate that such 

a case exists, should be forwarded to 
the Resident by the District Magistrate. 

6. In applying for extradition from other States under 

the direct Political control of the 

G. R. No. 4646 o£ Government of India, the evidence 

10 June 1891, Poli- establishing a prima facie case should 

tical Department para 7,7 , V> i- • i k ^ i_ 

„3 ond 4. be forwarded to the Political Agent by 

the District Magistrate, 



♦As amended by G. B- Political Department No. 1682 of 1st 
JIarch 1917. 



EXTRADITION BULES. 523 

It should also be noted that it is laid down bytreatjr 
that the Hyderabad Darbar is not bound to surrender any 
of its own subjects special reasons must therefore ba shown 
to the Honourable the Resident at Hyderabad in support 
of any application for the surrender of such subjects. 



Special Rules for extradition to, or from Baroda 

No. 258. 

Political Department. 
Bombay Castle 14th January 1891. 
CIRCULAR. 

1. In supersession of Circular No. 4908, Political 
Department, dated the 7th August 1890, the following orders 
are now issued explanatory of the procedure to be followed 
in regard to extradition of criminals either to, or from 
Baroda. 

2. At the outset it must be borne in m ! nd, as 
principles of universal application to all extradition cases, 
including extradition with Baroda : — 

(i) — That the rules published by the Government of 
India, under the Extradition Act, are essential to 
its proper working, and supply necessary guarantees 
against abuse or injustice, namely the Noti5c*tion. 
Foreign Office, No. 31 J M dated the 12th March 
1875, published with Bombay Government Circular 
No. 2170, dated the 3 1st March 1875; and the 
Notification, Foreign Office, No 87 J., dated the 
16th August, 1876, published with Government 
Resolution No. 5342, dated the 16th September 
1876. 

(ii)— That the form of warrant which t every Political 
Agent, or the Agent to the Governor General 
must issue for the surrender of an accused from 
British India under Section IX, Act XXI of 



^524 rewa kantha directory. 

1879, or for surrender of other accused passing 
through British India, is that prescribed by 
Government Resolution No. 5721, dated the 7th 
September 1887. 

(iii) — That even when extradition is sought by one 
Native State (eg. Baroda ) from another ( e g. 
Rajpipla), and the accused must pass through 
British territory, it is advisable for the Political 
Agant asking for extradition to issue a similar 
warrant as prescribed in Bombay Government; 
Resolution No. 3479, dated the 20th June 1874* 
Such warrant will cover the transit through 
British territory and prevent application to the 
nearest British Magistrate for release from un- 
lawful confinement. 

$v)— That a return on all persons made over for trial 
by the Courts of any Native State, must be 
furnished every half year to the Government of 
Bombay under Rule 10 of the Rules mentioned 
in clause 1 of this paragraph. 

(v) — That it is a general instruction applying to 
extradition from all Native States with which 
officers of this Government are concerned, that in 
the event of extraordinary delay in the grant of 
extradition, or in the case of refusal to grant 
such extradition, where the refusal appears to the 
officer making the requisition not justified by the 
circumstances, a report should be made to Gov- 
ernment and direcb corresponcence avoided. 

(vi)— .That section 13 o£ Act XXI of 1879 provides 
further guarantees against abuse even after 
surrender, and Section 188 ot the Criminal Pro- 
cedure Code must not be overlooked. 

3. Turning from the general rules which are of 
universal application, the Governor in Council lays down 



EXTRADITION RULES. 525 

the following detailed directions fDr regulating extradition 
with Baroda which must be read with the foregoing 
observations : — 

{a)— Case of extradition of Baroda subjects to Baroda. 

As regards the extradition of a Baroda subjects 
Bought from a British District or from any Political 
Agency, it must be understood that the demand of 
the Governor-General's Agent is to be complied with 
at once. 

(b) — Case of extradition to Baroda of British subjects 
from a Brstish District. 

The provisions of Act XXI of 1879 imply any 
obligation on the part of the Briti3h Magistracy ia 
British India to execute the warrant of the Governor- 
General's Agent when received under Section 12. 

(c) Case of extradition to Baroba either of a British 
subject found outside British India, or of the 
subject of a Native State found in the State to 
which he owes allegiance 

In these cases the Act is not obligatory, beyond the 
limits of British India, and accordingly extradition will 
not be granted to Baroda without the submission of 
papers establishing the prim% facie case to the Political 
Agent of the State from whose jurisdiction either the 
British subject or that State's own subject is demanded. 

(d) Case of extradition to Baroda of the subject of 
one Native State found in another. 

In this case the demand of the Governor Gene al's 
Agent will be complied with as in case (a^ # 

4, As regards extraditioa from Baroda to Britis x 
India the following procedure will be observed ;— • 



526 BEWA KANTHA DIBECTOBY. 

(a)~-Case of extradition of a British subject demanded 
from Baroda by a British Magistrate; or of a 
subject of a Native State demanded by the Political 
Agent of that State. 

No prima facie case need be submitted. The certi- 
ficate of the British Magistrate or o£ the Political 
Agent that a prima facie case is established, snould 
alone accompany the demand or where under the law or 
tinder Government Kesolution No. 3479 ; dated the 20th 
June 1874, a warrant is required, the warrant. 

(b) Case of extradition from Baroda ot a Baroda 
subject 

The Governor in Council is pleased to lay down, 
for the information of all Political Agents and Magistrates 
subject to his authority, that in all cases where the 
extradition of a subject of the Baroda State is required 
from that state, the officer, in sending his demand or 
warrant to the Governor General's Agent, shall forward 
with it the papers establishing a grima facie case against 
the accused. 

(c) — Extradition of the subject of a Native State 
from Baroda to the State of which he is not a 
subject. 

The procedure will be the same as in case (a). 

5. The Governor in Council trusts that these rules 
will enable extraditien to be arranged without constant 
reference to Government or any risk of friction between 
Baroda and th6 British Districts or Native States concerned. 

W. LEE- WARNER, 

Secretary to Government, 



extradition bules. 52?, 

Extraditioii With Rajputana. 
-Government of India's Letter No. 140- J. , of 18th September % 
1877, approving certain provisions for regulating extradi* 
tion between the States of Rajputana and the adjacent 
Bombay Native States, 

With reference to your letter No. 4821, dated 28fch 
August, 1877, I am directed by the 

♦No. 139-J., dated 8th Honourable tha President in Council to 

Septemder, 1877. (not c j c - *.- i_- t. 

printed) forward copy or communication *which 

has been addressed to the Officiating 

Agent to the Governor General in Rajputan*, authorizing 

the adoption, as between Rajputana States and adjacent 

Native States in the Bombay Presidency, of the procedure, 

in respect to extradition, enjoined for Bombay Native States 

inter se by the Resolution of that Government, No. 5235, 

dated. 22nd August 1873, under the conditions and with the 

reservations described in paragraph 2-4 of Mr. Ly all's letter 

No. 1801/121 J., dated 28th June, 1877. 

2. In order to give effect to the procedure hereby 
sanctioned, I am to request that the necessary instructions 
may, with the permission of His Excellency the Governor 
in council, be issued to the Political Officers concerned in 
the Bombay Presidency. 



Letter No. 1801 121 /. of 28th Jicne, 1877 from the Agent 
to the Governor General in Rajputana to the Government 
of India, referred to in paragraph 1 of the above letter. 

I have the honour to reply to your letter No. 158 J,, 
dated 12th December, 1876, enquiring whether there is "any 
objection to the adoption as between Rajputana States, and 
adjacent Native States in the Bombay Presidency of the* 
procedure enjoined with rigard to Bombay Native States 
inter se by Resolution of that Government, No, 5235 dated 
22ad August, 1873." 



528 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

2. There is, I consider, no objection against) adopting 

the reciprocal procedure as between these adjacent States, 

that when a Political Agent certifies that an accused person 

ought to be surrendered, the Political Agent of the State 

in which the accused can be pointed oub, or is known to be, 

shall cause him, if possible, to be surrendered to the Political 

Agent certifying. This is indeed already the recognized 

practice on this border to a considerable extent. Provided 

always? that Rule 5 ( amended* ) and 9 
* Foreign Department of th Ruleg j S3aed un( j Qr th Foreign 
Notification No. 87-J., ^„ XT _ . XT T , , , 

dated 16th Augnst, 1876. Office Notification No. 31-J , dated 12th 

March, 1875, be understood to apply 

to persons thus surrendered, in so far as these rules stipulate 

that the officer to whom surrender is made shall hear what 

the accused has to say before making him over to the State 

and shall be responsible that he receives a fair trial and a 

proper sentence. 

3. I understand that these demands will usually be 
made only for surrender of heinous offenders. It will be 
remembered that certain Courts have already jurisdiction 
upon this border for adjudication of complaints and charges 
among subjects of different States. The Marwar Court of 
Vakils takes cognizanee at Abu of Palanpur cases, and the 
Border Panchayats decide cases among the border bhiU. But 
although these Courts can punish at discretion, it must be 
allowed that they are mainly U3ed for awarding fines and 
compensation; and whenever a heinous offence is com nibted, 
it is very essential that the offender should be seized and 
surrendered for immediate trial. Nevertheless there are 
certain classes of offences, a3 for example, affrays and raids 
among tribal bhils, which are still bast dealt with by the 
Border Courts, c and the Political Agents concerned should 
settle, in coasutation over any particular case, whether the 
accused ought to be at once surrenderad to a Native State, 
or whether they would try the offence at the Court of 



EXTBADITION BtJ^E*. p §2 f 

* Vakils or Border Panehayat. In the revised rules for the 
Border Panchayats, which are this day submitted, the system 
proposed is that all cases shall ba decided by two British 
Officers meeting on the border. And without doubt, such a 
system will be much satisfactory to the State surrendering 
a subject than his trial by another Native State. 

4. In short I am of opinion that the Political Agents 

on either side of the border should always, to the best o£ 

their power, impose reciprocally demands for surrender of 

heinous offenders, though certain peculiar cases ought to ba 

reserved, by consent, for the Vakils Courts, and the Border 

Panchayats. And objection ^takan under 

oo*?°; 523 f i d Q a ^ d paragraph 4 of the Resolution* of the 
22nd Augnst, 1873. £, ,. ^ i , -r^ . 

(jrovernment or Bombay by a Kajputana 

State might go before the Agent to the Governor General 

for disposal. 

Extradition of Ccnvicts. 

Extract from Government Resolution No. 1641 of 27th March 
1874, Political Department, ruling that convicts undergoing 
sentences in Jails in British India cannot be extradited 
for the purpose of being tried for offences committed in 
Native States. 

Letter from the Solicitor to Government, No. 204 # 
dated the 4th March 1874. Submitting, in reply to Govern* 
ment letter, No. 555 o£ 1874, a copy of opinion of thei 
Honourable the Advocate General, No. 12, dated 28th 
February 1874, en the above question. 

" I do not think that convicts undergoing sentence in 
a jail in British India can be removed from custody, under 
a warrant issued by a Political Agent, under section 
12 of the Extradition Act (Act XI of 1872 ), for 
the purpose of being tried for an offence committed in a 
Native State. The Prisoner's Testimony Act ( Act XV of 
1869) does not admit of such removal; and the Extradition 
67 



#30 BBWA KAHTHA DIBECTOBY. 

Act contains no clause allowing it. Indeed the language ot- 
section 12 of the latter Act. ' : The accused person, when 
arrested, shall be forwarded to the place and delivered to 
the officer named in warrant " seems to point such warrants 
being executed only sgainst persons at liberty, and not to 
persons already in confinement. 

" As Mr. Peile himself admits there are objections to 
handing over to Native States prisoners convicted by British 
Courts and undergoing sentence, and I have little doubt that 
it was the intention of the Legislature that the Extradition 
Act should not apply to such persons. 



Famine— Free Trade. 

{Translation from Gujrati). 

No. 905 of 1896. 
To, 

The Chiefs of Rewa Kantha. 

In pursuance of Government Resolution No. 6999 
dated 27th November 1896, I have honour to state that in 
virtue of the impending famine and the measure to be 
adopted to combat against the same, it is highly important 
to have to private trade the business of the supply and 
distribution of food according to the recommodation of the 
Famine Commission. Subjects of Native States who apply 
for relief in British India will not be refused. Bat Chiefs 
should take measures to alleviate the sufferings of their 
poor subjects, and should co-operate with tho British Govern- 
ment by adopting a uniform practice in allowing free trade 
and other matters. On account of freedom of importing- 
articles of commerce from the Khalsa territories of the 
British Government, subjects of many Native States have 
already been benefited. You are therefore requested to be good 
enough to make arrangements accordingly. 

Dated 10th December 1896. 



F0R8ST. 5$1 

Fires — All persons enjoined render help in extinguishing. 

NOTIFICATION. 
No. 50 of 1894. 

It is hereby notified to people of all castes and 
and positions that it is the bounden duty of every man, 
woman and child to tender help in extinguishing a fire, 
when it breaks out. It is their duty to do such work for 
the sake of themselves, their neighbours and the Government 
and no consideration should be accepted for such help. It 
is a duly obligatory on every body. Refusing to help 
without any remuneration is shameful and cruel in the case 
of a person of any caste, creed oc religion; and such an 
action is sinful and wicked in the highest degree. All 
people must co-operate in putting out a fire, and one 
should not ask or expect money for helping in such a work. 
Government and Society at large will always willingly take 
notice of persons or body of persons who show zsal in 
protecting life and property from fire. They will equally 
not refrain from reprimanding those person? for their inhuman 
and base behaviours, who decline to help in putting out fire 
until they receive trifling copper-money. It is hoped that 
such disgracing act will not be met with any longer in 
Rewa Kantha and Panch Mahals. 

Dated 14 4-1894. 



Forest Department passes to be given. 

(Translation Jrom Gujrati). 

No. 98-104 of 1886. 
To, 

The Principal Chiefs of Rewa Kantha. 

Carts of timber firewood &c. from the territories of 
Rewa Kantha Chiefs which entar into or pass through 
Patich Mahals, are given passes by the States. Bat some 
times, only one pass is given for more than one cart; 



532 U RBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

and sometimes the nakadar writes more or less 
timber in the pass than what they actually contain. Some* 
times full particulars are not written in the pass. In order 
to put a stop to such irregularities, the States have already 
been addressed, but satisfactory arrangements hrave not yet 
been made in some places. By giving one pass between 
many carts, both the inspector and the cartmen are put to 
a great deal of inconvenience, when the carts do not ail go 
together. By showing the quantity ot timber more or less 
suspicion arises that Panch Mahals timber might have beea 
taken in the carts. This results in a great deal of 
correspondence and tin timber is attached. By giving 
incomplete particulars in the pass full and satisfactory infor- 
mation is not available. And if the cartmen &c. are 
stopped and sent back to have the passes corrected or to 
get separate passes, they will be put to a lot of trouble 
and loss. At the s^me time it would not do if no arrange- 
ment is made to stop such irregularities. lb is therefore 
directed that proper arrangement must} be made in this 
behalf and efficient men employed at the places where 
passes are issued so that the Forest Department miy not 
have reason to complain in future and there may noli renain 
any necessity of nicking any other arrangement in the 
matter. 

Dated 20th Eebruary 1886. Camp Navagam. 



Forest Department— Timber seized for theft $0. 

Nos. 342-348 of 1886. 
To, 

r J he Principal Chiefs of Rewa Kantha. 

At the request of the District forest officer of Panch 

Mahal, contained in his shera, No. 118 dated 30th June 

1886 it is directed that if any timber of the jungle of the 

Panch Mahal territory be seized in your territory on account 

of theft etc. and attached by the Forest Department mod 



FOREST. 53.$' 

if the same be delivered for safe custady by any officer of 
that Department, to the Patel or any Police officer of 
your village the latter should take it in his possession 
and give a receipt thereof and should take care that no ona 
makes any change therein and should give him all the 
assistances he can in this behalf. Such arrangements 
should be made. 

Dated 10th July 1886 



Forest — Timber of Native States brought into British terri- 
tory should be covered by formal passes. 

No. 499 504 of 1896. 
To, 

The Principal Chiefs of Bewa Kantha. 

The Conservator of Forests, Northern Division, in his 
letter No. 355 dated 25th May 1888 informs me that the 
Forest officers under him report that, teak and other forest 
produce is imported from Native States into British terri- 
tories in contravention of the rules promulgated under 
Section 41 of the Forost Act. Therefore I have the honour 
to request that the attention of your officers should bo 
drawn to the rules in question. Teak and other timber 
brought iato British territory should be covered by green 
passes in the annexed form bearing the signature and 
designation of duly authorized officer of the State, infor- 
mation of which may have been given to the Forest Offiaer. 
And further all such timber should be stamped with a seal 
of which a specimen must have been registered in his office. 
If such is already the practice in force in your State, 
intimation to that effect may be given. I£ not, I hope yon 
will kindly arrange to adopt the practice awj let me know* 
Dated 19th June 1896. 



5$4 BEWA KANTHA D1BECT0BY. 

Forest Department— Stamps for timber. 

(Translation from Gujrati) 

No, 605-611 of 1897. 
To, 

The Principal Chiefs of Rewa Kantha. 

The Conservator of Forests in his letter No. 1899 
dated 28th September 1897 informs me that some stamps 
for imprinting on timber of Native State forests were 
submitted to him fDr registration, and have been accepted, 
but asks that the owners of such stamps should be informed 
that large and intricate stamps require great deal ef time 
in imprinting them perfectly on timber, and would therefore 
be inconvenient, and that if the stamp is not perfectly 
imprinted on the wood, it cannot be recognized, and such 
confusion is likely to ensue. He further says that he has 
made it a rule to decline to register a stamp which if not 
equal in size to a British rupee and therefore advises that 
Native States also should have stamps of the same size, 
and that even those who have already got their stamps 
prepared will be benefited by having new stamps of the 
approved size. In view of tbe above. I hope you will 
arrange to get new stamps prepared according and registered. 
As a sample for preparing the new stamps two sketches of 
stamps are drawn on paper and forwarded herewith. I 
request that the arrangements which may be made may be 
communicated to me. 



Forest Department — Samples of imprints of stamps to be 
sent. 

( Translation from Gujrati.). 

No. 580-587 of 1899. 
To, 

The Principal Chiefs of Rewa Kantha. 

In pursuance of English Letter No. 2884 dated 15th 
December 1899 from the Conservator cf Forests. N.D. asking 



FOREIGN MERCENARIES. 535 

that every year imprints on paper, of stamps to be put on 
timber ot Native States Forests cf Rewa Kantha should be 
sent to him to be registered in his office, I have ! the 
honour to request you will forward to that officer direct, 
samples on papers of the stamps to be imprinted on timber 
of your States' forests, and henceforth every year the same 
way may be regularly done : copies of letters with dates of 
transmission being sent to this office for record with the 
imprints of the stamps. 

Dated 23-2.99, 



Foreign mercenaries* 

No. 1232 of 1848. 
To, 

All Chiefs and Talukdars of Rewa Kantha: 

In pursuance of Bombay Government Resolution No. 
2305 dated 31st May 1848 I have the honour to request 
that you will immediately submit a detailed list showing 
the number and names of foreign mercenaries such as 
Makranas, Rohilas, Pathans, B*lochs ; Afghans and Arabs> 
&c. in your service; for what period they have been staying 
in this country and which of them have married and settled 
and for what period. Further you are instructed that in 
future you should not employ any such foreign mercenaries, 
without obtaining our permission. Dated Samwat year 1904 
Jeth Sudi 11th Monday the 12th June 1848 A. D. 

Camp Baroda. 



Government Servants should not assist in person m 
writing petitions. 

No. 1177 of 1851 A. D. 

NOTICE. 

The Bombay Government have formerly by a Notifica- 
tion of 30th September 1843, prohibited Government ser- 
vants from doing work of private persons. And now a 



536 KBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

further Circular order No. 2541 dated 20th June 1851 of 
the same object has been received, wherein it is ordered 
that Government servants should not assist any person in 
preparing an appiication or reply or anything. Therefore 
English writers and Marathi and Gujrati Karkuns of this 
Agency should act accordingly 30th June 1851; A. D.Camp 
Baroda. 



Government servants— not to incur debts. 

No. 1279 of 1854. 
To, 

All Thandars and Japti Karkuns. 

Know that you are not to incur any debt of any 
person in your Thana except for provisions, and that too 
should not exceed your pay and should be paid up from 
July upto the end of September. Know this to be an urgent 
order. Dated 4th July 1854 A. D. 

Camp Baroda. 



Government servants— to pay for supplies received. 

{^translation from Gujrati Circular of the Political Agent.} 

No. 1375-1384 of 1845. 
To, 

All Chiefs and Thakors of Rewa Kantha. 

To wit; — I have received letter No. 3651 dated 31st 
July from Townsend Esqr., Secretary to the Bombay Govern- 
ment. In paragraph 4 thereof it is ordered that Govern* 
ment Karkuns, sepoys, etc. of the Rewa Kantha Agency 
should be told not to take food or anything gratis without 
paying for the same, when they go out on their districts 
tours in the villages, and that the States and Talukas 
should be informed accordingly. This is therefore written 
for your information. Dated 15th August 1845 a. d. 



■Note — Similar instructions were issued to all Thandars 
with the intimation that the above is the order of Govern- 
ment and that they should therefore notify it to all people 
of their respective districts, and that they themselves are tc> 
behave as stated above. 



Government servants— Bazar rates should be given far 
supplies. 

No. 357 of 1913. 

Camp Wadia, 24th January 1913. 

CIRCULAR. 

The Collector and Political Agent has good reasons to 
believe that supplies ilb less than the Bazar rates are bsing^ 
given to officers' Camps in accordance with the ancient 
custom. It must be understood that both in the Agency 
and the District proper, this must cease and. HeaJs of 
offices will be held responsible for seeing that it does cea9^ 

2. I am issuing the following orders as to my ovro 
case. 

The Daftardar or the Chitnis or indefault o£ both of 
these the senior member of the office in camp will in the 
case of each camp decide whether it is necessary to appoia* 
a special modi to supply the cajap or whether there is a 
sufficiently good bazir near at hand to supply the needs of 
subordinates. Where such a bazar exists no modi should h& 
appointed. Where one is necessary, the officer concerned 
shoulJ on the first day of his arrival at the camp call the 
Modi and tbre Taluka officer or other official who hast 
prepared a statement of prices. He should go through this 
statement with the modi and correct it where nece^s*ry* 
making perfectly su e that the full bazar rates are charged 
so as to ensure the Modi making his legitimate profit. If 
there is any dispute as to these, the matte? should be referred 
to the Collector. ■:.■ TJjjp jDaftardar or Chitnis should warn tb* 

l^odL-tlih!)/.^^^ 01 '^^ 1111 ^ 69 k ftV6 been warned to complain 

1 68 



$38 BBWA K1NTHA DIREOTOBY. 

to him, if the goods supplied are not of the quality and 
description stated. He should also direct him to report at 
once to the local Taluka or other official, if any subordinate 
has failed to settle his bill before the camp moves. The 
Collector will, when he is able to do so, satisfy himself of 
this by personal enquiry. 

I hope that all Departments concerned will co-operate 
to ensure the observance of Government orders by the above 
or some similar means. 

'Government servants — Not to receive any presents. 

{Translation of Gujrati Circular of the Political Agent.) 
To, No. 412-420 of 1846. 

All Thandars. 

Circular letter No. 771 dated 25th February 1846 

A. D. from John Willoughby Esqr. Chief Secretary to 

Government has been received, in which it is directed that 

no officer or other servant of Government should ever accept* 

N&zrana, Chandlo, or any present under any other nam?, 

from the people under them, on occasions of marriages or on 

any account. You should therefore act accrrdingly. If you 
do not obey the order, Government will hold you responsible. 

Dated 3rd March 1846 A. D. corresponding with Falgun 

Sud Samvat year 1902. Camp Hallol Zilla Pavagarh. 

Impressed carts— Hire of~- 

No. 2566 of 1902. 

Camp Halcl 
20\24 November 1902. 
In modification ol this office notification No. 1064 of 
the 16th June 1858 the Political Agent directs that the 
rate of hire for impressed carts in the Kewa Kantha Agency 
is revised so as to assimilate with that obtaining in the 
Paneh Mahals and other Districts of Gujrat and is fixed at 

3 annas per kos (l£ miles) instead of one rupee Babasahi foe 
6 kos. 

G. CARMICHAEL, 

Potitiml Ageat* 



LAND. 53t 

Iiand— Sale, mortgage^ or gift of tribute-paying land prohi' 
bited. 

No. 2979 of 1848 A. D. 

Notice is hereby giv9ii to the public that at the time 
when the Mewasi villages of Tillakwada Sankheda, Dabhoi, 
Sinor Pargana and Chandod Tappa came under the control 
of the British Government, Government have guaranteed 
the regular payment of Jamabandi amount to the Gaikwat 
Government. Therefore no person should sell mortgage or 
give away in gift any land liable to Government due or 
any revenue thereof, and if any one will do so, Government 
will not recognize the same. Therefore this notificatian is 
published, in order that no one might give or receive any ! 
land of the afore said description. Dated 4th Decenaber 
1848 A, D. Camp Kothamba under Lunawada. 

NoTE-Such a guarantee was given in respect of the 
tribute of the other States and Talukas of Pandu Mewas 
also. These orders were therefore communicated to all States 
and Talukas. 



Lands of tribute payers. — Sale prohibited. 

No. 1402 of 1914. 

Rewa Kantha Agency Office, 

Godhra, 18th April 1914. 

This office notification No. 2979 dated 4th December 
1848 is republished for the information & guidance of all 
Talukdars and their subsharers of the Sankheda and Pandu 
Mewas with all intimation that the notification is just as 
binding as ever upon them and no transfers, alienations or 
incumbrances of the land held by them contrary to the 
notification in question will be recognised on any accauat. 

No. 2979 of 1848. 

Notice is hereby given to the public that} at the time 
when the Mewas villages of Tilakwada, Sankheda, Djvbhoi, 



3*fr rewa kantha -Directory. 

Sioor Pargataa and Chanod Tappa came under the control 
«sf the British Government, Government have guaranteed the 
regular payment of Jamabandi amount to the Gaikwar Gdv- 
^roment. Therefore no person should sell mortgage or give 
mway in gift any land liable to Government due or any 
revenue thereof, *nd if any one will do so, Government will 
not recognize the same. Therefore this notification is publish- 
ed in order that no one might give or receive any land of 
the aforesaid description. 

Camp Kothamba under Lunawada dated 4th December 
1848 A. D. 

Note. — Such a guarantee was given in respect of the 
tribute of the other states and Talukas of Pandu Mewas 
also. These orders, therefore apply to all States and Talukas 
c£ the Pandu Mewas also. 

0. HUDSON, 

Political Agent, Rewa Kantha. 



tands — Bhats, Charans and others should not sell — 

No. 4927 of 1872. 

NOTIFICATION. 

The Political Agent, Rewa Kantha notifies to the 
public that, Bhats, Charans, Bhands, Bhavayas, Naikas and such 
people who might have received grants of land from the 
Kajas of Lunavada and Baria in their territoris, may 
watinue to enjey them but they should not sell them lands 
to anybody without the permission of Government, and no 
one should buy % the same as well. If any body buys or 
sells such lands in contravention of this Notification, Govern- 
ment will not recognize the sale. Dated 17th December 
1872. Camp Pandu. 



4 liAWS. 



M 



Laws* — Acts of the Government of India in force generally 
in all Native States including those in the Reioti 
Kantha Agency. 



Year. 


No. 


Title. 


1860 


XIV 


Indian Penal Code as amended by act 27 of 
1870, 19 of 1872, 8 of 1882, 10 of 188S 
1 & 4 of 1839, 10 of 1891, 3 of 1894, ; 
3 of 1895, 6 of 1896, 4 of 1898, 3 of 
1910 and 8 o£ 1913. 


1869 


IV 


Indian Divorce Act aa amended by Act 10 
of 1912. 


*> 


XX 


Indian Volunteers' Act (as amended by A.cb 
X of 1896 and V of 1909.) ;.; 


1872 


I 


Indian Evidenca Act. 


9% 


XV 


Indian Christian Marriage Act as amended 
by Act 2 of 1891, Acb 2 of 1892, Act 
1 of 1903 and Act 13 of 1911. 


1873 


X 


Indian Oaths Aot. 


J 674 


II 


Administrator General's Act as amended by 
Act 9 of 1881, Act 2 of 1890 and Acb 
7 of 1891. 


1874 


III 


Married woman's Property Act. 


a 


IX 


European Vagrancy Act. 


1875 


IX 


Indian Majority Act). 



512 



BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



Year. 



1880 
1884 



1885 

1886 




Title. 



VII 
VII 



1895 



XIII 
II 

VI 



1887 


X 


)> 


XIV 


1888 


IV 


1809 


VII 


»9 


XV 


1890 


I 


it 


IX 



XIV 



Iadian merchant shipping Act. 

Indian steam-ships Act, 1884 (as amended 
by Acts III cf 1890 III of 1902, and 
I o£ 1909). 

Indian Telegraph Act. 

Indian Income-tax Act, (as amended by Act 
XI of 1903). 

Births, Deaths and marriages Registration 
Act, (as amended by Acts XVI of 1890 
and IX of 1911.) 

Native passenger Ships Act. 

Indian Marine Act, (as amended by Acts 
XVII of 1888 and I of 1899). 

Indian Reserve Forces Act. 

Succession Certificate Act. 

Indian official Secrets Act, (as amended by 
Act V of 19 04). 

Revenue Recovery Act, 1890. 

Indian Railway's Act, a3 amended by Aci- 

IX of 1896. 
* 

Pilgrim ships Act. 



LAWS. 



543. 




1897 



1898 


III 


19 


V 


9> 


VI 


1900 


III 


1903 


XIV 


» 


XV 


1904 


VIII 


1908 


V 


o 


VI 


1908 


IX 


*9 


XVII 


1909 


III 


1911 


VIII 


1912 


IV 


»• 


VI 


1913 


II 


» 


III 



Title. 



General Clauses Acb, as amended by Acb 

I of 1903, 

Lepers Ac-t, as amended by Act XII of 1903 
Code of Criminal Procedure. 

Indian Post Office Act, as amended by Acta 

II o£ 1903 and III of 1912. 

Prisoners Act, as amended by Act I of 1903. 

Indian Foreign Marriage Act. 

Indian Extradition Act as amended by Act 
I of 1913. 

Indian Universities Act. 

Code of Civil Procedure. « 

Explosive Substances Act. 

Indian Limitation Act. 

Indian Emigration Act, as amended by Aob 
XIV of 1910. 

Presidency-towns Insolvency Acb. 

Indian army Acb. 

Indian Lunacy Act. 

Indian Life Assurance Companies Acb. 

Official Trustees Act. 

Administrator General's Aot. 



5,44 BEWA KANJHA BIBECTOBY. 

LIMITATION RULES. 

No, 4158 dated the 20 th Jane 1911.— In exercise of 
the powers and jurisdiction delegated by the Government of 
India under Foreign Department Notification No. 2859 I. A. 
dated the 19th Jane 1903, and of all other power enabling 
him in this behalf the Governor in Council is pleased to 
direct the introduction into the Rewa Kantha Agency with 
effect from the 1st January 1912, of the Kathiawar Agency 
Limitation Law. 




j fir . . 



KATHIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. 5*5 

POLITICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Bombay Castle, 12th December 1890. 

No. 7791.— With t v e sanction of the Governor General 
of India in Council the Governor of Bombay in Council is 
pleased ti direct the introduction of the following Law of 
Limitation into the Kithiawar Political Agency, with effect 
from such data as may ba fixed in this behalf by a 
Notification published in the Kathiawar Agency Gazette, 
whicbt date shall be not less than six months after the first 
pnblication of such Notification. 

By order of the Right Honourable 

the Governor in Council 

W. LEE-WARNER, 

Secretary to Government, 

THE KATHIAWAK AGENCY LIMITATION 
LAW, 1890. 

PART I. 

Preliminary. 

«, , .... 1# (1) This Law may be called 

lt The Kathiawar Agency Limitation 
Law, 1890." 

(2) It applies to all suits instituted, appeal printed 
and applications made in or to the Court; of the Political 
Agent in Kathiawar or in or to any Court subordinate to 
the said Court or subject to tin superintendence thereof, 
whether in the exercise of civil or criminal jurisdiction, and 
to all appeals fro n any decree or order of arty o£ the Courts 
aforesaid and to all applications founded on any decree, 
order or proceeding of any of these Courts. 

69 



^46 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

(Z) It shall come Into force on such date as may be 

fixed in this behilf by a notification, 
Commencement. . 

published in the Kathiawar Agency 

Gazette, which date shall be not less than six months after 
the first publication of such notification. 

2. (1) On and from that day all rules and limitation 

_ .. . hitherto deamed to be applicable to 

liepeahng seciion. . 

such eu:ts, appeals and applications as 

aforesaid shall be repaaleij bub nothing herein contained 
shali be deemed to affect any title fully acquired or to revive 
any right to sue barred under those rutas or t:> affect the 
recognition, continuance or revival, in accordance with those 
rules, of any dabt, engagement* or obligation by any instru- 
ment or transaction mide before this law comas into fjrce. 

(2) Any suit in wh'ch the cause of action has 

accrued before the day on wh : ch this 
Suits of which cause . . , n , ., , , . , 

of acli.n has arisen lavv conies mfco f rce * hM be brought 
before the date on which within .the period of limitation pres- 
ibis law comes into ., , . ,, . . f -,, . ,, 

f orce# cnbed in the said tuies or within tna 

period prescribed by this law for a 

similar suit of which the. cause of action accrues on the said 

dav, whichever shall end the soonor. 



Difinitions 



3. In this law. unless there be 
something repugnant in the subject or 
context -— 



' pl^intifF" includes also any person from or through 
whom a plaintiff derives his right to sue; 'applicant* includes 
also any person from or through whom an applicant derives 
his right to apply ; and 'defendant ' incliJes also any 
person fr^m or through whom a defendant derives his 
liability to be sued: 

' easement ' includes a right, not arising from contract. 
4>y which one parson is entitled to remove and appropriace 



KATHIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. 547 

for his own profit any part of the soil belonging to another* 
or anything growing in, or attached to, or subsisting upon r 
the land of an* ther: 

' bill of exchange * includes also a hundi and a cheque: 

c bond * includes any instrument) whereby a person 

obliges himself to pay unney to an* tlnr, on conditio-! that 

the cblgati on shall be void if a spec* Bed act i3 performed, 

or is not perfi rmed, as the case may be : 

' promissory note ' means any instrument whereby the 
maker engages absolutely to pay a specified au-n of money 
to another ab a time therein limited, cr oa demand, or at 
sight: 

1 trustee' does not include a benamidar, a mortgagee 
retraining in possession after the mortgage has been satisfied, 
or a wrong-do* r in possession without titl : 

' suit ' does not include an ippu-al or an application: 

'registered ' menus duly registered. 

(a) within the meaning of the rules regulating 
or recognising tha regist ation of documents lor the 
time being in force in the Kathia^^r A.genc^, or 

(b) under and according to any law in -vie by the 
Governor General of India in Council or by the 
Governor in Coune 1 of B mbiy: 

and nothing shall be deemed to be done in 'good 
faith' which is not done wiih due care and attention. 



P4RT II. 

Limitation of Suits, Appeals and Applications. 
4. Subject to the pr-«vjscn* contained in sections five 
to twent) fi *e (inclusive), every suit 

Dismissal of suits instituted, * pp al presented, a id appli- 
&c.,instituted, &c , atter > rr r rr 

period o£ limitation. . cation made attt-r the period of limita- 

t on pre cribed iheref >r Uy the schedule 
hereto annexed shall be dismissed, although linaita^n has 
not beep set up as a defence. 



518 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Explanation.— A suit is instituted in ordinary case3, 
when the plaint is presented to the proper officer; in the 
case of a pauper, when his application for leave to sue as 
a pauper is Bled; and in the case of a claim agiinst a 
Company which is be;ng wound up by the Court, when 
the claimant first senas in his claim to the official liquidator. 

Illustrations. 

(a) A suit is instituted after the {P scribed period of 
limitation. Limitation is not set up as a defence and 
judgment is given for the plaintiff. The defendant appeals. 
The appelhte Court joust dismiss the suit, 

(b) An appeal presented af&er the prescribed period 
is admitted and registered. The appeal shall, nevertheless 
be dismissed. 

5. (1) If the period of limitation prescribed for any 

suif, appeal or application expires on a 
Proviso where Court d whon fche Court ig c ] QSe , fche suifc 
is closed when period * . ' 

expires. appeal or application may be instituted, 

presented cr made on the day that the 

Court reopens. 

(2) Any appeal or application f jr a review of judgment 

may be admitted after the period of 

Proviso as to appeals limitation prescribed therefor, when the 
and applications for l 

review. appellant or applicant satisfies the Court 

that he had sufficient cause for not 

[resenting the appeal or making the application within such 

period. 

6. When, by any special law now or hereafter in 

force anl in its nature applicable to the 

Special laws of limitation* . , , > , . • .. . . ,, 

1 case, a period ot limitation is specially 

prescribed for tnyst.it appeal or application, nothing herein 

contained fchall htfect or alter the period so prescribed. 



KATHIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. 541> 

7. If a person entitled to institute a suit or make an 

. _. ._. application be, at the time from which 

Legal disability. _ . i , ,. . • • , • i j 

the period ot limitation is to be reckoned 

a minor, or insane, or an idiot, he may institute the suit or 
make the application within the game period after the dis- 
ability has ceased, as woull otherwise have been allowed 
from the time prescribed therefor in the third column of the 
-schedule hereto annexed. 

When he is at the time from which the period of 
limitation is to be reckoned affected by 

? bTtio nd SUCCeSsive two such labilities, or when before 

his disability has ceased, he is affected 
by another disability, he may institute the suit or make the 
application within the same period, after both disabilities 
have ceased, as would otherwise have been allowed from the 
time so prescribed. 

When his disability continues up to his death, his legal 
representive may institute the suit or make the application 
within the same period after the death as would otherwise 
have been allowed from the time so prescribed. 

When such representative is at the date of the death 

_. , .,. „ affected by any such disability, the 

Disability ot , _ . . „ 

representative. ru ' es contained * n the first two para- 

graphs of this section shall apply. 

Nothing in this section applies to suits to enforce rights 
of pre-emption, or shall be deemed to extend for more than 
three years from the cessation of the disability or the death 
of the person affected thereby, the period within which aay 
suit must be instituted or application made. 

Illustrations. 

(a). The right to sue for the hire of a boat accrues 
to A during bis minority. He attains majority four years 
after such accruer. He may institute his suit at any time 
within three years from the date of his attaining majority. 



550 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

(J). A, to whom a right to sue for a legacy has 
accrued du-ing his minority, attains majority eleven years 
after surh accruer. A has, under the ord'narV law. only 
one vear remain : ng within which to sue. But under this 
section an extension of two years will b^ allowed him, making 
in all a pericd of three years from the date of his attaining 
majority within which he may bring his suit. 

(c) A riaht to sue accrues to Z during his minority. 
After the accrual, bnt while Z is still a miuor, he becomes 
insace. Time runs against Z from the date when his insanity 
and minority cease. 

(d). A right to sue accrues to X during his minority, 
X dies before attaining maj rity and is succeeded by Y, his 
minor son. Time runs against Y from the date of his 
attaining majority. 

(e). A rght to sue for an hereditary office accrues to 
A, who at the time is insane. S^x years after the accrual 
A T( covers his reason. A has six years, under the ordinary 
law, from the date when his insanity ceased within which 
to institute a euit. No extension of time will be given him 
under this section. 

(f). A right to sue as landlord to recover possession 
from a tenant accrues to A, who is an idiot A dies three 
years after the* accrual, his idiocy continuing up to the date 
of his death. A's representative in interest has, under the 
ordinary law, nine years from the date of A's death within 
\ihich to bring a suit. This section does not extend that 
time, except where the representative is h ; ms If under dis- 
ability when the representation devolves upon him. 

8. When cne of several joint-creditors or claimants is 

_. . .,., r under any such disability, and when a 

Disability ot one ,. . . . 

joint-creditor. < discharge can be given without the 

concurrence of such person, time will 

run against them all; but where no such discharge can be 



kathiawab limitation law. 551 

given, time will nob run as against any of them until one 
of them becomes capable of giviog such discharge without 
the concurrence of the others. 

Illustrations. 

(a). A incurs a debt to a firm, of which B, and X> 
are partners B is insane and C is a minor. D can give a 
discharge of th9 debt without the concurrence of B and C. 
Time runs against B, C and D. 

(b) incurs a debt to a firm, cf which E, F and G 
are partners. E and F are insane, an I G is a minor. Time 
will not run agninst anv of tbem until either E or F 
becomes sane, or G attains majority. 

9. When once time has begun to 

o£ C °£ UmS r ™ ning run no subsequent disability to sua 

stops it : 

Provided that where letters of administration to tha 
estate of a creditor have been granted to his debtor, the 
running of the time prescribed -for a suit to recover the 
debt shall be suspended while the administration continues. 

10. Notwithstanding anything hereinbefore contained. 

no suit 8gainst a person in whom 
Suits against express property ha8 become vested in trust 
trustees and their re- * L J 
preseutatives. * or an y specific purpose, or against his 

legal representatives or assigns ( not 

being assigns for valuable consideration) for the purpose oE 

following in his or their hauds such property shall be 
barred by any length ot time. 

11. (1) Suits instituted in any of the Courts aforesaid 

on contrac s entered into in a place 

*onL°Z £oreign not 8Ul J ect to tho J arisdic6iou of * n 7 

of the said Courts are subject to th» 
rules prescribed by this law. 



552 BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY, 

11. (2' No foreign rule of limitation shall be a defence 

to a suit instituted in any of the said 
Foreign limitation Courts on a contract entered into in 

any such place as aforesaid, unless 
the rule has extinguished the contract, and the parties were 
domiciled in snch place during the period prescribed by such 
rule. ^^—^ 

PART III. 

Computation of Period of Limitation. 

12. (1) In computing the period of limitation prescribed 

for any suit appeal or application, the 

Exclusion o£ day on day from whJch such io( j is to be 

which right to sue ac- , , ■ .. , . , , 



crue3. 



reckoned shall be excluded. 



(2) In computing the period of limitation prescribed 
for an appeal, an application for leave 

Exclusion in case of ^ appeal as a pauper, and an applica- 
appeals and certain ,."/• • /» • i ^ ., i 

applications. tlon for a r6Vlew of 3* 'g^ent the day 

on which the judgm nt complained of 
was pronounced, and the time requisite for obtaining a copy 
of the decree, sentence or orier appealed ag-iinab or sought 
to be reviewed, shall be excluded. 

(8) Where a decree is appealed against or sought to 
be reviewed, the time requisite for obtaining a copy of the 
judgment on which it is founded shall also be excluded. 

(4) In computing the period of limitation prescribed 
for an application to set aside an award, the time requisite 
for obtaining a copy of the award shail be excluded. 

13. In computing the period proscribed for any suit, 

. the time during which the defendant 

Exclusion or time o£ , . . 

defendant's absence ba s been absent from places subject to 

from places subject to the jurisdiction of the Court aforesaid 
the -jurisdiction o£ the . ,, .» . , , ,. -x i ^ 

Courts aforesaid. * h * J1 ' l£ durln S such tla ' e lt bas DOt 

been possible to serve a summons upoa 

iim, be excluded. 



KA^HIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. #53 

14. (1) In computing the period of limitation pres- 
cribed for any suit, the time during 

Exclusion of time oE which the plaintiff has been prosecuting 
proceeding bona fide .,, i ,.,. A , . ., ° 

in Court without juris- Wlth due dwgenoe another civil pro- 
diction. ceeding, whether in a court of first 

instance or in a Court of appeal, 
against the defendant shall be excluded, where the proceeding 
is iounded upon the same cause of action and is prosecuted 
;n good faith in a Court which, from defect of jurisdiction, 
or other cause of a like nature, is unable to entertain it. 

(2) In computing the period of limitation prescribed 

for a suit, proceedings in which have 

o^riTcivTf 50 beeQ 8ta y° d b y <* der u ° d <" «" Code 
Procedure Code s. 20. of Civil Procedure, sectian 20, the 

interval between the institution of the 

suit and the date ot so staying proceedings, and the time 

requisite for going from the Court in which proceedings are 

stayed to the Court in which the suit 13 reinstitued, shall 

be excluded. 

(3) In computiug the period of limitation prescribed 

for any application, the time during 

Like exclusion in case which the applicant has been m*fcog 

of apphcotion. ... „ WlSte 

another application for the same rejfcjr, 

shall be excluded, where the last-mentioned application is 
made in good faith to a Court which, from defect of juris- 
diction, or other cause ot a like nature, is unable to grant it. 

Explanation 1. — In excluding th9 time during which a 
former suit or application was pending or being made, the 
day en which the suit or application was instituted or 
made, and the day on which the proceedings therein ended, 
shall both be counted. 

Explanation 2. — A plaintiff resisting an appeal presented 
on the ground of want of jurisdiction,, shall be deemed ta 
be-proseeuting a suit within the meaning of *hh section. 

70 



554 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Bombay caetla 8th September 1919. 
(4) No. 6108. — la exercise of the power delegatad 
under the Indian (Foreign jurisdiction) order in Council, 1902 
by the Governor General in Council in the notification of 
the Government of India in tho Foreign Department, No. 
2859-I-A, dated the 19fch June 1903, and of all other 
powers enabling him in this behalf, the Governor in Council 
is pleased to direct that the following clause be added as 
clause (4) to section 14 of the Kathiawar Agency Limitation 

Law, 1890, published below Government Notification No. 
7791, dated the 12th December 1890:— 

(4) In computing the period of limitation for any 
suit which cannot be instituted without the certificate of the 
Agent to the Governor in Kathiawar consenting to the 
hearing of the claim, the time required for obtaining the 
certificate of the Agent to the Governor, i. e. the time 
between the date of the application for cartificate and the 
date on waioh the plaintiff is informed of the grant of the 

certificate shall be excluded. 

By crder of His Excellency the 

Houourable the Governor in Council. 

J. CRERAR, 

Secretary to Government 

15. In computing the period of limitation prescribed 

„ , p . for any suit, the institution of which 

Exclusion of nme dur- ..... -, 

ing which commence- has been stayed by injunction or order, 

ment of suit is stayed ^he time of the continuance of tae 
by injunction or order. injunotion Qr orderf the day on which 

it was issued or made, and the d»y on which itt was with- 
drawn feha.l be excluded. 

16 In commuting the period of limitatiun prescribed 

for a suit for possession by a purchaser 

Exclusion of lime dur- . c j~ ^ *u^ 

ing which judgment. at a sale in execution of a decree, the 

debtor is attempting time during which the judgmant-debtor 

to s 

sale, 



to set aside execution ^ ^ prosecuting a [rocee ding to 



eet aside the sale, shall be excluded. 



KATHIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. 555 

17. (1) When a person who would, if he were living, 

have a right to institute a suit or 

Effect o£ death before make an application, dies before the 
right to sue accrues. . r r 

right accrues, the period cf limitation. 

shall be computed from the time when taera is a legd 

representative of the deceased capable of institute or 

making such suit or application. 

(2) When a person agiinst whom, if were living a 
right to institute a &uit or make an application would have 
accrued, dies before the right accrue % the period oflimitation 
shall be computed from the time when there i3 a legal 
representative of the deceased against whom the plaintiff 
may institute or make such suit or application. 

(3) Nothing in the former part of this section applies 
to suits to enforce right of pre-emption or to suits for the 
possession of immoveable property or of an hereditary office. 

18, When any person having a right to instite a suit 

or make an application has by means 
Effeet o£ Fraud. „,. . i_ * * i.ui ij 

or fraud, been kept trom the knowledge 

of such right or o£ the titia on which it is founded, 

or where any document necessary to estab'i^h such 
right has been fraudulently concealed from him, 

the time limited for instituting a suit or making an 
application 

(a) against the person guiUy of the fraud or 
accessory thereto, or, 

(b) against any person claiming through him 
otherwise than in good faith and for a valuable consi- 
deration, 

shall be computed from the time when th9 fraud first 
became known to the person injuriously affected thereby, or, 
in the case of the concealed document, when he first had 
the means of producing it or compelling its production. 



556 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

19. (1) If before the expiration of the period pres- 

__ . cribed for a suit or application in 

Effect or acknowledge ~ , . , t 

ment in writing. respect of any propsrty or right, an 

acknowledgment of liability in respect 

of such property or right has been made in writing signed 

by the party against whom such property or right is claimed, 

or by some person through whom he derives title or liability, 

a new period of limitation, ac3ording to tha nature of the 

original liability, shall be computed from the time when the 

acknowledgment was so signed. 

(2) When the writing containing the acknowledgment 
is undated, oral evidence may be given of the time when it 
was signed. But oral evidence of its contents shall not be 
received, 

Explanation 1.— For the purposes of this section an 
acknowledment may be sufficient, though it omits to specify 
the exact nature of the property or right, or avers thab the 
time for payment, delivery, performance or enjoyment his 
not yet come, or is accompanied by a refusal to pay, deliver, 
perform, or permit to enjoy, or is coupled with a claim to 
a set off, or is addressed to a person other than tha person 
entitled to the property or right. 

Explanmion 2. — In this section ' signed ' means signed 
either personally or by an agent duly authorized in this 
behalf. 

20. (1) When interest on a debt cr legacy is, before 

__ . the expiration of the prescribed period, 

liiftect of payment ot , . 

interest as such. P ald as such b y *te person liabb to 

pay the the debt or legacy, or by his 
agent duly authorized in this behalf, 

_„ or when part of the principal of 

Eftec!: of part-payment , , . . , ? , . . \ A » 

of principal. a debt is, befere the expiratiou of toe 

prescribed period, paid by the debtor 

o by his cg^nv duly authorized in this b3half, 



KATHIAWAB LIMITATION LAW. 557, 

a new period of limitation, according to the nature of 
the original liability, shall be conputed from the time when 
the payment was made : 

Provided that in the case of part-payment of the 
principal of a debt, the feet of the paymanb appears in the 
h*nd-writing of the person making tha same. 

(2 ) Where mortgaged land is in the possession of the 
mortgagee, the receipt of the produce 

d^o£°m^gedlSd" of such land shal1 be de3ined t0 be a 

payment for the purpose of this section. 

21. Nothing in sections 19 and 20 renders one of 

several joint controctors, partners, 
One of several loint , . . , , 

contractors, &c, not executors or mortgagees chargeable by 

chargeable by reason o£ reason only of a written acknowledge- 

acknowledgment or pay- t s ; d Qr f nfc madQ 

ment made be another ot ° ' r J 

them. by, or by the egent of, any other or 

others of them. 

22. When, after the institution of a suit, a new 

plaintiff or defendant is substituted or 
Effect of substituting ftdded tfae suifc Ml ftg da y 

-r adding new plamtift ° 

or defendant. be deemed to have been instituted when 

he was so made a party. 

Provided tiab, whan a plaintiff dies, and the suit is 

continued by his legal representative, 

Proviso where original -.in j u-^ u~ A^^^i 4-r* 

plaintiff dies. lb 8hall > as re 2 ards hirn - be d9em9d to 

have been instituted when it was 

instituted by the deceased plaintiff : 

Provided also, that, when a defendant dies, and the 
suit is continued against his legal re- 
Proviso where original presentative, it shall, a? regards him, 
uetenuaDt oies* t # . *■ v 

be deemed to have bean instituted when 

it was instituted against the deceased defendant. 



558 RKWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

23. In the case of a continuing breach of contract and 

in the case o£ a continuing wrong in- 
and^rongr^^ 1163 dependent of contract, a fresh period 

of limitation begins to run, at every 
moment of the time during which the breach or the wrong, 
as the case may be, continues. 

24. In the case of a suit for compensation for an act 

which dees not give rise to a cause of 

Suit for compensation act ; on un l es s some specific injury actually 
tor act not actionable l . . " 

without special damage results therefrom, the period of limit- 
ation shall be computed from the time 
when the injury results. 

Illustrations. 
(a), A owns the surface of a field. B owns the 
subsoil. B digs coal thereout without causing any immediate 
apparent injury to the surface, bub at last the surfaca sub- 
sides. The period of limitation in the case of a suit by A 
against B runs from the time of the subsidence. 

(b). A speaks and publishes of B slanderous words 
not actionable in themselves without special damaga causei 
thereby. C in consequence refuses to employ B as his clerk. 
The period of limitation in the case of a suit by B against 
A for compensation for the slender does not conmence till 
the refusal. 

~ , ,. 25, All instruments shall for the 

(Jomput ation or time - 

mentioned in instruments Purposes of this law, be d-erned to be 

made with reference to the Gregorian 

calendar. 

Illustrations. 
(a). A Hindu makes a promissory note tearing a 
native date only, and payable four months after date. The 
period of limitation applicaole to a suit on the note runs 
from the expiry of four months after date computed acc3rding 
to the Gregorian calendar. 



KATHIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. 559 

(b) A Hindu makes a bond, bearing a native date 
only, for the repayment of money within one year. The 
period of limitation applicaolo to a suit on the bond runs 
from the expiry of one year after date computed according 
to the Gregorian calendar. 



PART IV. 

Acquisition of Ownership by Possession. 

26. (1) Where the access and use of light or air to 
and for any building have been peace- 
Acquisition o£ right ab] • d therewifch asaa easement, 
to easement. J J J 7 9 

and as of right, without interruption, 

and for twenty years, 

and where any way or water-course, or the use of any 
water, or any other easement ( whether affirmative cr 
negative ) has been peaceably and openly enpyed by any 
perscn claiming title thereto as an easement and as of right, 
without interruption, and for tvveuty years. 

the right to such access and use of ligat or air, way, 
watercourse, use of water, or other easement, shall be abso- 
lute and indefeasible. 

(2) Each of the said period of twenty jears shall b( 
taken to ba a period ending within two ye^r3 next) beforu 
the institution oi the suit wherein the claim to which such 
period relates i3 contested. 

Explanation. — Nothing is an interruption within the 
meaning oi: this section, unless where there is an actual 
discontinuance cf the possession or eajoyment by reason of 
an obstruction by the act ot such person other than the 
claimant, and unless such obstrucfci:n is submitted to or 
acquiesced in for one year aftsr th»s claimant 1 has notice 
thereof, and of the parson making or authorizing the sam& 
to be made. 



560 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Illustrations. 

(a) A suit is brought in 1881 for obstructing a right 
of way. The defendant admits the obstruction, but denies 
the right of way. Tha plaintiff proves that the right was 
peaceably and openly enjoyed by him, claiming title thereto 
as an easement, and as of right, without interruption, from 
1st January 1860 to 1st January 1880. The plaintiff is 
entitled to judgment, 

(b) In a like suit also brought in 1881 the plaintiff 
merely proves that he enjoyed the right in manner aforesaid 
from 1858 to 1878. The suit shall be dismissed, as no 
exercise of the right by actual user has been proved to have 
taken place within two years next before the institution cf 
the suit. 

(c) In a like suit the plaintiff shows that the right 
was peaceably and openly enjoyed by him for twenty years. 
The defendant proves that the plaintiff on one occasion 
during the twenty years had asked his leave to enjoy the 
right. The suit shall be dismissed. 

27. Provided that, when any land or water upon, 
over, or from which any easement hns 

Exelusion in favour been Enjoyed or derived has been held 
ot reversioner or ser- . 

vient tenement. under or by virtue cf any interest for 

life or any term of years exceeding 

three years from the granting thereof, the time o£ the 

enjoyment of such easement during the continuance of such 

interest or term, shall be excluded in the computation of the 

said last-meLtioned period of twenty years, in case the claim 

is, within thVee years next after the determination of such 

interest or term, resisted by the person entitled, on such 

determination, to the said land or water. ; 



KATHIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. 561 

Illustration. 

A sues for a deolaration that he is entitled to a right 
of way over B's land. A proves that he has enjoyed the 
right for twenty-five years: Bttt B shows that during ten 
of these years C, a Hindu widow, had a life-interest in the 
land, that on C's death B became entitled to the land, and 
that within two years after C's death he contested A*3 
claim to the right. The suit must be uisoaissed, as A, with 
reference to the provisions of this section, has only proved 
enjoy inert for fifteen years. 

28. At the determination of the period hereby limited 
to any person for instituting a suit for 

Extinpshment of poSseS sion cf any property situ^tad 

right to property. l # J l r w 

within the local jurisdiction of any 

of the Courts aforesaid, his right to such property shall 

be extinguished. 



>r ^Sfe^ 



71 



562 



BEWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY, 



THE SCHEDULE. 

(See. Section 4) 
First Divisiok: Suits. 



Description o£ Suit. 



Period o£ 
limitation 



1.-— For compensation for do- 
ing, or for omitting to do 
an act alleged and in good 
faith intended to Lave been 
done in pursuance of a law 
applicable to the defendant. 

2. — By a person alleging 
•violent dispossessions for an 
order on that ground only 
for restitution. 

3. — Under the Specific Relief 
Act, 1877, section 9, to 
recover possession of im- 
moveable property. 

i. — Under the Code of Civil 
Procedure, Chapter XXXIX 
(of summary procedure on 
negotiahle instruments.) 



5 — Upon any enactment for 
a penalty or forfeiture in- 
curred thereunder. 

6. — For the wages of a house- 
hold servant, artisan or 
labourer. 

7. — For the price of food or 
drink sold by the keeper 
of a hotel, tavern or lodg- 
ing house. 



farl 1 

Three 

months. 

3 months. 



Part II 
Six months 

6 months. 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Part III. 
2 years. 

Two years 



Ditto 



Ditto 



When the act or omission 
takes place. 



When the dispossession occurs. 



When the dispossession occurs. 



When the instrument sued 
upon becomes <I le and 
payable. 



When the penalty or forfeiture 
is incurred. 



When the wages accrue due. 



When the food or drink is 
delivered. 



KATHIAWAB LIMITATION LAW- 



ser 



First Division Suits — continued. 



Description of suit. 



8. — For the price o£ lodging. 

J). — To enforce a right of pre 
emption, whether the right 
is founded on law, or gene- 
ral usage or on special 
contract. 



.10. — By a person against whom 
an order is passed under 
sections 280, 281, 282 or 
335 of the Code of Civil 
Procedure, to establish his 
right to, or to the present 
possession of, the property 
comprised in the order. 

11. — To set aside a sale in 
execution of a decree of a 
Civil Court. 



12.« — To alter or set aside a 
decision or order of a Civil 
Court in any proceeding 
other than a *uit. 



13. — To set aside any act or 
order of an officer of Gov- 
ernment in his official 
capacity, not herein otherwise 
expressly provided for. 

ll. — Against Government to 
recover money paid under 
protest in satisfaction of a 
claim made by the revenue 
authorities on account of 



Period of 
limitation 



2 years. 
Ditto . 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 

When the price becomes pay- 
able. 

When the purchaser takes un- 
der the sale sought to be 
impeached, physical posses- 
sion of the whole of the 
property sold, or, where the 
subject of the sale does not 
admit of physical possession, 

. when the instrument of sale 
is registered. 

The date of the order. 



When the sale is confirmed or 
would otherwise have beccme 
final and conclusive had no 
such suit been brought. 

The date of the final decision 
or order in the case by a 
Court competent to deter- 
mine it finally. 



The date of the act or order. 



Whp*? he payment is made, 



564 



BEWA KANTH A DIRECTORY. 



First Division: Suits — continued. 



Description of suit. 



Period o£ 
limitation 



arrears of revenue or on 
account of demands recover- 
able as such arrears. 



15.— Against Government for 
compensation for land 
quired for public purposes 



ac- 



Time from whieh period 
begins to run. 



Part III 

2 years 

contd. 



Two years. 



16. — Like suit for compensation 
when the acquisition is not 
completed. 

17.— For compensation for false 
imprisonment. 

18. — By the executors, admi- 
nistrators or representatives 
of a person deceased in res- 
pect of any wrong comitted 
within one year before his 
death for which such person 
might have sued. 

19.— By the executors, adminis- 
trators or representatives 
for compensation to families 
for loss occasioned by the 
death of a person caused by 
actionable wrong. 

20. — For compensation for any 
other injury to the person. 

21. — For compensation for a 
malicious prosecution, 

22. — For compensation for 
libel. 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



The date of determining the 
amount of the compensation. 



The date of the refusal to 
complete. 

When the imprisonment ends. 

The date of the death of the 
person wronged. 



The date of the death of the 
person killed. 



Ditto ... When the injury is comitted. 



Ditto ... 



Ditto 



When the plaintiff is acquitted 
or the prosecution is otherwise 
terminated. 

When the label is published* 



KATHIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. 



56* 



First Division: Suits— continued* 



Description of suit. 



Period of 
limitation 



23. — For compensation tor slan- 
der. 



Part III 
Two years. 
continued. 

Two years 



24. — For compensation for loss 
of service occasioned by the 
seduction of the plaintiff's 
servant or daughter. 

25. — For compensation for in- 
ducing a person to break a 
contract with the plaintiff. 

26. — For compensation for an 
illegal, irregular or excessive 
distress. 

27. — For compensation for 
wrongful seizure of move- 
able property under legal 
process. 



28. — Against a carrier for com- 
pensation for losing or in- 
juring goods. 

29. — Against a carrier for com- 
pensation for delay in deli- 
vering goods. 

30* — Against one who, having 
a right to use property for 
specific purposes, prevents it 
to other purposes. 



Ditte 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Part IV 
Three years 

Three years 



Ditto 



Ditto ... 



Time from which period 

begins to 



run 



When the words are spoken 
or, if the words are not ac- 
tionable in themselves, when 
the special damage complain- 
ed of results. 

When the loss occurs. 



The date of the breach. 



The date of the distress. 



The date of the seizure. 



When the loss or injusy occurs* 



When the goods ought to b» 
delivered. 



When the perversion first be- 
comes known to the persoa 
injurred thereby. 



565 



KEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

First Division: Suits — continued. 



Description o£ suit. 



Period of 
limitation 



31. — Against an executor, ad- 
ministrator or other represen- 
tative of a person deceased 
in respect of any wrong 
committed by such person 
within one year before his 
death for which he might 
have been sued and for which 
a right of suit survives. 

32. — For .the recovery of a 
wife. 

33. — For the restitution of con- 
jugal rights. 



34. — For compensation for any 
malfeasance, misfeasance or 
non-feasance independent of 
contract and not herein spe- 
cially provided for. 



35. — For compensation for obs- 
tructing a way or a water- 
course. 

36. — For compensation for 
diverting a water-course. 

37. — For compensation for 
trespass upon immoveable 
property. 

38. — For compensation for 
infringing copyright or any 
other exclusive privilege. 



H&rt IV 

Three years 
continued. 

3 years. 



Time from which period 



begins to run. 



When the wrong complained. 
of is done. 



Ditto 
Ditto 

Ditto 



When possession is demanded 
and refused. 

When restitution is demanded 
and is refused by the husband 
or wife, being of full age and 
sound mind. 

When the malfeasance, mis- 
feasance or non-feasance 
takes place. 



Yart V. 
Five years, 

Five years 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



The date of the obstruction. 

The date oi r the diversion. 
The date of the trespass. 

The date of the infringemen 



kathiawar limitation law. 



5GT 



First Division: Suits. — continued. 



Description of suit. 



Period o£ 
limitation 



39. — To restrain waste. 

40. — For compensation for in- 
jury caused by an injunction 
wrongfully obtained. 

41. — Of the nature referred to 
in the Indian succession Act, 
1865, section 320 or 321, or 
in the Probate and Adminis- 
tration Act, 1881, sections 
139-140 to compel a refund 
by a person to whom an 
executor or administrator 
has paid a legacy or distri- 
buted assets. 

42. — By a ward, who has at- 
tained majority, to set aside 
a sale by his guardian. 

43. — By any person bound by 
an order respecting the pos- 
session of property made un- 
der the Code or' Criminal 
Procedure, chapter XL, or 
by any person bound by an 
order such as is referred to 
in Article 2, or by any one 
claiming under such person 
to recover the property com. 
prised in such order. 

44. — For specific moveable pro- 
perty lost, or acquired by 
theft, or dishonest misappro- 
priation or conversion, or for 
compensation for wrongfully 
taking or detaining the same. 



Part V. 
Five years 
continued. 

Five years 

Ditto ... 



Ditto 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



When the waste begin. 
When the injunction ceases. 



The date of the payment or 
distribution. 



Ditto 



Ditto 



When the word attains majo- 
rity. 

From the date of the final 
order in the case. 



Ditto 



When the person having the 
right to the possession of the 
property first learns in whos* 
possession *it is. 



568 



BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

First Division: Suits* — continued. 



Description of suit. 



45, — For other specific move- 
oble property, or for com- 
pensation for wrongfully tak- 
ing or injuring or wrongfully 



Part V— 

Five years 
continued. 

Five years 



detaining the 



same. 



Period of 
limitation 



46 — For the hire of animals, 
venicles, boats or household 
furniture. 

47. — For the balance of money 
advanced in payments of 
goods to be delivered. 

48.- — For the price of goods 
sold and delivered where no 
fixed period of credit is agreed 
upon. 

49. — For the price of goods 
sold and delivered to be paid 
for after the expiry of a fixed 
period of credit. 

50. — For the price of goods 
sold and delivered to be paid 
for by a bill of exchange 
no such bill being given. 

51. — For the price of trees or 
growing crops sold by the 
plaintiff to the defendant 
where no fixed period of 
credit is agreed upon. 

52. — For the price of work 
done by the plaintiff for the 
defendant at «his request, 
where no time has been fixed 
for payment. 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



When the property is* wrong- 
fully taken or injured, or 
when the detainer's possession 
becomes unlawful. 



When the hire becomes payable* 



When the goods ought to be 
delivered. 



The date of the delivery of the 
goods. 



When the period of 
expires. 



credit 



Ditto ... 



When the period of the 
posed bill expires. 



The date of the sale. 



When the work is done> 



KATHIA War limitation law. 
First Division: Suits. — continued. 



c5W 



Descrip ion of suit. 



53. — For rroney payable 
money lent. 



for 



Period of 
limitation 



54 — Like suit when the lender 
has given a cheque for the 
money. 

55 — For money lent under an 
agreement that it shall be 
pa) able on demand. 

56 — For morey deposited un- 
der an agreement that it shall 
ba payable on demand. 

57 — For money payable to the 
plainiift fcr money paid for 
the delendant. 

58. — For money payable by 
Ihe defendant to the phintitf 
fcr money received by the 
defendant for the plaintiff's 
use. 

59. — For money payable for 
inierejrt u?on money due 
from the defendant to tie 
plaintiff. 

60 — For money payable to the 
pla in till ixr money found 
to he due from the delend- 
ant to ihe plaintiff on ac- 
counts stated between them. 



Part V— 
Five years 
continued. 

Five years 
Ditto ... 

Ditto .. 

Ditto ... 

Ditto .., 
Ditto .. 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Time from which \ eriod 
begins to run. 



When the loan is made. 



When the cheque is paid. 



When the loan is made. 



When the demand is made. 



When the money is paid. 



When the money is received. 



When the interest becomes due. 



When ihe accounts are stated 
in wri ing, signed by the de- 
fendant or his agent duly 
authorized in this behalf, un- 
less wh^re the debt i,«, by a 
simultaneous agreement in 
writing signed as aforesaid, 
m'ide pay « bleat a future time t 
and then when that 'time ar- 
rives. 



72 



$70 



KEWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

First Division: Suits* — continued. 



Description o£ suit. 



61. — For compensation for 
breach of a promise to do 
anything at a specified time, 
or upon the happening of a 
specified contingency. 

62. — On a single bond where a 
day is specified for payment. 

63 — On a single bond where 
no such day is specified. 

64. — On a bond subject; to a 
condition. 

65. — On a bill of exchange or 
promissory nole payable at 
a fixed time after date. 

66. — On a bill of exchange pay- 
able at sight, or a p ter sSght, 
but not at a fixed time. 

67.— On a bill of exchange ac- 
cepted payable at a parti- 
cular place. 

68. — On a bill of exchange or 
promissory note payable at 
a fixed *ime after sight or 
after demand. 

69. — On a bill of exchange or 
promi*-ory note payable on 
demand and not accompanied 
by any writing restraining 
or postponing the right to 
sue. 



Period o£ 
limitation 



Part V— 

Five years 
continued. 

Five years 



Ditto 
Ditto 
Dlt'o 
Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto 
Ditto 

Ditto 



Time from \shicb periad 
begins to ran. 



When the time specified ar- 
rives or the contingency hap- 
pens. 



The day so specified. 



The dale of executing the 
bond. 



When the condition is broken* 



When the bill or note falls 



When the bill is presented. 



When the bill is presented al? 
that place. 



When the fixed time expires. 



The date of the bill or note* 



kathiawab limitation law. 

First Division: Suits. — continued. 



511 



Description of the suit. 



Period of 
limitation 



Part V.— 

[Five years 
continued. 
I ^ 
70.— On a i romiesory note or Five years 
bond payable by instalments. 



Time from which jeriod 
begins to run. 



11. — 0:i a promissory note or 
bond payable by instalments, 
which provides tha*. if de- 
fault be made in payment 
of one instalment, the whole 
shall be due. 



72. — On a promissory note given 
by the maker to a third 
person to be delivered to 
the payee after a certain 
event should happen. 

73. — On a dishonoured foreign 
bill where protest has been 
made and notice given. 

74. — By the payee against the 
drawer of a bill of exchange 
which has been dishonoured 
by non-acceptance. 

75. — By the aceeptor of an 
accommodation-bill against 
the drawer. 

76. — ^nif on a bill of exchange, 
promissorv not* or bond not 
. herein expressly provided for 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto *. 



Dito 



The expiration of the first 
term of yaymmt as to the 
j art tbm payable ; and. for 
tie other parts, the ton iratio* 
of the respective terms of 
payment. 



When the first default 19 mad* 
unless wh*re the payee or 
obligee waives the benefit of 
tie provision and then whe* 
f i >h default is made in re- 
spect of which there is n# 
such waiver. 



Tre date of the delivery to 
the pbyee. 



When the noti e is given. 



The oVe of the refusal to 
accept. 



When the accepter pays th# 
amount of the bill. 



When ho bill, note « boa* 
boconus payable. 



m 



MWA KANTHA D1BKCT0RY. 

First Division : Suits— continued. 



Description of suit. 



Period o£ ] Time from which period 
limitation.! begins to run. 



Fait V.— 
5 years.-—, 
continued. 

77.— By a surety against the Five years. When the surety pays the 
principal debtor* creditor. 



78. — By a surety against a co- 
surety. 

79, — Upon any other contract 
to indemnify 

80 — By an attorney or vakil 
for his costs rf a suit cr a 
particular business, there be- 
ing no ex/ iess agreement 
as to the time when such 
costs are to be paid. 

81. — For the balance doe on 
a mutual, op<n and current, 
account, where there have 
bven reciprocal demands bet- 
ween the parties. 

82 — On a policy of insurance 
when the sum assured is 
payable immediately alter 
proof of the death or loss 
ha- been given to, or re- 
ceived by, tiie insurers. 



83.— By the 
pren ia paid 



assured to recover 
under a policy 
voidable at the election of 
the insurers. 



84. — Against a factor for an 
account. 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditlo 



Ditto 



Ditto 



When the snre+y pays anything 
in excess of his own share. 

When the plaintiff is actually 
damnified. 

The dale of the tennination of 
the suit or business, or ( where 
the attorney or vakil properly 
discontinues he suit or busi- 
ness \ the date of such dis- 
continuance. 

The cloj-e of the year in which 
the last item admitted or 
proved is entered in the 
account: such year to be 
computed as in the account* 

When proof oF the death or 
loss is given or received t<> 
or by the insurers whether 
by or from ih* plaintiff or 
any other person. 



When the insurers 
avoid the policy. 



elect to 



When the «*c~ount is, dating 
the coii inuanoe of the agency, 
demanded and refused or. 
where no such demand is 
made when the agency ter- 
minates. 



KATHIAWAB LIMITATION LAW. 



57ft 



First Division : Suits — continued. 



Description of suit. 



against 



85 . — By a principal 

his agent for moveable pro- 
perty received by the latter 
and not accounted for. 



86 — Other suits by principals 
against agents for neglect or 
misconduct. 

87. — To cancel or set aside an 
instrument not otherwise pro- 
vided for. 



88. — To declare the forgery of 
an instrument issued or re- 
gistered. 

89. — To declare the forgery 
of an instrument attempted 
to be enforced against the 
plaintiff. 

DO. — For property which the 
plaintiff has conveyed while 
insane. 

81 — To set aside a decree 

ob ained by fraud, or for 

otiier relief on the ground 
of fraud. 

■92./— For relief on the ground 
of mistake. 

93.— For money paid upon an 
existing consideration which 
afterwards fails. 



Period of Time from which period 

limitation.! begins to run. 



Part V.— 
Five years 
continued.! 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditt 



to 



Ditto 



Ditto 



When the account is during 
the continuance of the agency 
demanded and refused, or, 
where no such demand is 
made when the agency ter- 
minates. 

When the neglect or miscon- 
duct becomes known to tbo 
plaintiff. 

When the facts entitling tho 
plaintiff to have the instri- 
ment cancelled or set aside 
become kuown to him. 

When the issue or registration 
becomes known to the plaintiff* 



The date to the attempt. 



When the plaintiff is restored 
to sanity, and has knowledge 
of the conveyance. 

When the fraud becomes known 
\ to the party wronged. 



When the mistake becomes* 
known to^the plaintiff. 

The date of the faflaro. 






RKWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

First Division: Suits. — continued. 



Description of Suit. 



Period of 
limita ion 



Part V.~ 
five years 
continned. 

94.— To make good out of the Five years 
general estate of a deceased 
liustee tie loss occasioned by 
a breach of trust. 



95. — For contribution by a 
party who has paid the whole 
amount due r>nder a joint 
decree, or by a sharer in a 
joint estate who has paid the 
whole amount of revenue 
due from himself and his 
co-sharers. 

96 — By a co trustee to enforce 
against the estate of a de- 
ceased trustee a claim for 
contribution. 

97. — For a seaman's wages 



98 — For wages not otherwise 
expressly provided for by 
this schedule. 

99. — By a Muhammadan for 
exigible dower (mu'wajjal) 



100 — By a Muhammadan for 
deferred dower (mu'wajjal) 

101. — By a mortgagor after 
the mortg age has bern satis- 
fied, to recover surplus col- 
lections received by the mort- 
gagee. 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



Tho datf* of the trustee's dcaih, 
cr, if the loss ha- not tte>T* 
resulted, th3 date :f tie losi* 



The date of the ■ plaintiff's 
advarce in excess of hit 
own share. 



When the right to oontribn* 
tion accrues. 



The end of the voyage dur- 
ing which the wages are 
earned. 

When the wages accrue due. 



When ibe dower is demanded 
acd refused, or (where dur- 
ing the continuance of the 
marriage no such demand 
has been made) when the 
marriage is dissolved by 
death or divorce. 

When the marriage is dissolv- 
ed by death or divorce. 

When the mortgagor re-enter*- 
on the mortgaged property. 



KATHIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. 



575 



First Division Suits. — continued. 



Description of suit. 



Period of 
limitation 



102 — For an account and 
share of the profits of 
dissolved partnership. 



103.— By the manager of a 
joint estate of an undivided 
family for contribution in 
respect of a payment made 
by him on account of the 
estate. 

104 — By a lessor for the 

value of trefs cut down by 

his lessee contrary to the 
teims of the lease. 

105.— For the profits of im- 
moveable property belonging 
iotlw plaintiff which have 
been wrj^gfully received by 
the defendant. 



10G. — For arrears of Rent. 

107. — By a vendor of immove« 
able property to enforce his 
lien for unpaid purchase 
money. 



108 — For a call by a com 
pany legistercd vndar 



Part V.— 
Five years. 
continued. 

Five years, 



enactment. 



any 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



The date of the dissolution. 



The tate of the payment. 



When the trees are cut down* 



When the profits are received^ 
or, where the plaintiff has 
been dispossessed by a decree 
afterwards set aside on ap- 
peal, when he recovers pos- 
session. 



When the arrears become dua- 



The umo fixed for completing 
the sale, or (where the title is 
accepted after the time fixed 
for completion) the date oE 
the acceptance. 



When the pall is payable* 



^§76 



MWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

First Division : Suits— continued. 



Descrip ion of suit. 



Peiiod of 
imitation 

Part V — 
tire v*ars. 
continued 



109 — For specific performance Five years. The dale 
of a contract 



Time from which jeui 
Legms to run 



110. — Frr (he rescision of a 
contract. 



Ill — For compensation for 
the breach of any contract 
express or : mplied, not in 
writing registered, and not 
berein specially provided for. 



112. — For compensation for the 
breach of a contiact in writ- 
ing registered. 



113 — Uron a foreign judormen t . 
as defined in the Code of 
Civil Procedure. 



114. — To obtain a 
iha an 
invalid, or 
took place. 



alleged 



declaration 

adoption is 

never in fact 



115. — To obtain a declaration 
that an adoption is valid. 



316. — Suit for which no period 
of limitation is provided else- 
where in this schedule. 



Part VI 
Six years, 

Six years. 



Part VII. 

12 years. 

12 years. 



fixed for the per- 
fom>nnce, or if no such t*ate 
is fixed, when the ] lairtiff 
has rotice that performance 
is refused. 

"When the fa^ts entitling the 
plaintiff to have the contract 
rescinded first become known 
to JLim. 

When the contract is biofcen, 
or ( w) ere there are success- 
ive breaches) when the bieach 
in resiect of which the suit 
is ins iluted occurs, or (vhere 
the brrach is continuing) 
when it ceases. 

"When the period of limitation 
would begin to run against 
a suit brought on a similar 
co tract not registered. 

The date of the judgment. 



When the alleged adoption 
becomes known to the plaintiff. 



When the rights of the adopted 
son as hueh are interfered with. 



When the ri ditto £ue accrues* 



KATHIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. 

Fibst Division: Suits.— continued. 



5*f 



Description of suit. 



117. — Upon a judgment obtain- 
ed in another court, or a 
recognizance, when such a 
suit lies. 

118 — For a legacy or for a 
share of a residue bequea- 
thed by a testator, or for a 
distributive share of the 
property of an intestate. 



Part VII- 
12 years 



12 years. 



Ditto ... 



119 . — For possession 
hereditary office. 



of an 



UO. — Suit during the life of a 
Hindu or Muhammadan fe- 
male by a Hindu or Muha- 
mmadan who, if the female 
died at the date of institut- 
ing tho suit would be en- 
titled to the possession of 
land, to have an alienation 
of such land made by the 
female declared to be void 
except for her life or until 
her re-marriage. 

12-. — By a Hindu governed 
by the law of the Mitak- 
shara to set aside his father's 
alienation of ancestral pro- 
perty. 



Period of 
limitation 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



The date of tho judgment or 
recognizance. 



When the legacy or share 
beeomes payable or deliver- 
able. 



When the defendant takes 
possession of the office ad- 
versely to the plaintiff. 

Explanation.— An hereditary 
office is possessed when the 
profits thereof are usually 
received, or, (if there are 
no profits) when the duties 
thereof are usually performed. 



Ditto ... The date of the alienation. 



Ditto .. 



Ditto 



When the alienee takes pos- 
session of the property. 



78 



578 



MWA KAHTHA DIR1CT0RT. 

First Division: Suits— continued. 



Description of suit. 



122. — By a person excluded 
from joint family property 
to enforce a right to a share 
therein. 



123. — By a Hindu for arrears 
of maintenance. 



Period of 
limitation 



124.— By a Hindu 
laration of his 
maintenance. 



for a dec- 
right to 



125. — For the resumption or 
assessment of rent free land 



Part VII 

12 year*. 

continued. 

12 years. 



Ditto ... 



Ditto 



Ditto 



126. — To establish a periodically 
recurring right. 

127. — To enforce payment of 
money charged upon im- 
movable property. 

Explanation. — The allowance 
and fees respectively called 
malikana and haqqs shall, 
for the purpose of this clause 
be deemed to be money 
charged upon immovable 
property. 

12 g. — To recover movabe 
property Cv>Dveyed or be- 
queathed iu trust, deposited 
or pawned, and afterwards 
bought from the trustee, de- 
positary or pawnee for a 
valuable consideration. 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto .. 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



When the exclusion becomes 
known to the plaintiff. 



When the 
able. 



arrears are pay- 



When the right is denied. 



When the right to resume or 
assess the land first accrues* 



When the plaintiff is first 
refused the enjoyment of 
the right. 

When the money sued for 
becomes due. 



The date of the purchase. 



kathiawar limitation law. 



M9 



First Division: Suits — continued. 



Description of suit. 



129. — To recover possession of 
immovable property con- 
veyed or bequeathed in trust 
or mortgaged and after- 
wards purchased from the 
trustee or mortgagee for a 
valuable consideration. 

130. — Suit by a morfgacce for 
possession of immovable 
property mortgaged. 

131. -By a purchaser, at a 
private sale for possession 
of immovable property sold, 
when the vender was out of 
possession at the date of the 
sale. 

132. — Like a suit by a pur- 
chaser at a sale in execution 
of a decree when the judg- 
ment — debtor was out of 
possession at the date of 
the sale. 

133 — By purchaser of land 
at a sale in execution of a 
decree, for possession of the 
pui chased land w hen the 
judgment-debtor wa3 J n po 9 . 
session at the d a t e of the 



Feriod of 
limitation 



134. — By a landlord to recover 
possession from a tenant. 

135. — By a remainderman, a 
reve siouer (other thm a 
landlord) or a devisee, for pos- 
aession of immovable pro 
perty. 



Part VII 

12 years 
continued. 

12 years. 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



The date of the purchase 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 
Ditto 



When the mortgagor's right 
to possession determines. , 



When the vender is first 
titled to possession. 



en- 



When the judgment-debtor id 
first entitled to possession. 



The date of the sale. 



When the tenancy is deter- 
mined. 

When his estate falls into 
possession. 



580 



BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



First Division: Suits. — continued. 



Description o£ Suit, 



136, — Like suit by a Hindu 
or Muhammadan entitled to 
the possession of immovable 
property on the death of a 
Hindu or Muhammadan female. 

137. — For possession of im- 
movable property, when the 
plaintiff, while in possession 
of the property, has been 
dispossessed or has discon- 
tinued the possession. 

138. — Like suit, when the 
plaintiff has become entitled 
by reason of any forfeiture 
or breach of condition. 



139. — For possession of im- 
movable property or any 
interest therein not hereby 
otherwise specially provided p ar fc VIII 

j 30 years 



Period of 
limitation 



Part VII. 
72 years. 
continued. 

12 years. 



' Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



for 



30 years. 



140. — Against a depositary or 
pawnee to recover movable 
property deposited or pawned, j p ar ^ jx. 

60 years. 

141. — By a mortgagee for fore- go years. 

closure or sale. 



142. — Agdnst a mortgagee to 
redeem or to recover possess- 
ion of immovable property 
mortgaged. 

143 — Any suit by or on behalf 
of the Secretary of State for 
Iadii in Council. 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Time from which period 
begins to ran. 



When the female dies. 



The date of the dispossession 
or discontinuance. 



When the forfeiture is in- 
curred or the condition is 
broken. 



When the possession of the 
defendant becomes adverse to 
the plaintiff. 



The date 
pawn. 



of the deposit or 



When the money secured by 
the mortgage becomes due. 

When the right to redeem or 
to recover possession accrues* 



When the period o£ limitation 
would begin to run under 
ibis Act against a like suit 
Iqr a piivate person. 



KATHIAWAR LIMITATION LAW. 



58l 



Second Division: Appeals. 



Description of suit 



144.— Under the Code of 
Criminal Procedure from a 
sentence of death passed by 
a Criminal Court. 

145.— Under the Code of Civil 
Procedure to the Court of 
the Political Agent, 

146. —Under the Code of 
Criminal Procedure to any 
Court other than the Govern- 
ment of Bombay. 

147. — Under the same Code to 
the Government of Bombay 
except in the cases provided 
for by Nos. 144 and 149. 

148— Under the Code of Civil 
Procedure to the Government 
of Bombay except in the 
cases otherwise expressly 
provided* for. 

149.— Under the Code of 
Criminal Procedure from a 
judgment of acquittal. 



Period of 
limitation 



21 days. 



30 days, 



Ditto 



60 days 



90 days. 



6 months. 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



The date of the sentence. 



The date of the decree or 
order appealed against. 



The date of the sentence or 
order appealed against. 



The date of the sentence or 
order appealed against. 



The date of the decree 
order appealed against. 



or 



The date of the judgment 
appealed against. 



Third Division : Application. 



150.— Under the Code of Civil 
Procedure to set aside an 
award. 

151. — For leave to appear and 
defend a suit under chapter 
XXXIX of the Code of Civil 
Procedure. 



20 days 



Ditto 



When the award is submitted! 
to the Court. 



When the summons is served* 



382 



BEWA EJLHTHA. DIRECTORY. 

Third Division: Applications — continued. 



Description of suit. 



152. — For an order under sec- 
tion 629 of the same Code 
restoring to the file a re- 
jected application for review 

153. — By a plaintiff for an 
order to set aside a dismiss- 
al by default. 

15 i. — By a defendant for an 
order to set aside a judg- 
ment ex parte. 

155.— Under the Code of Civil 
Procedure, by a person dis- 
possessed of immovable 
property, and disputing the 
right of the decree-holder or 
purchaser at a sale in exe- 
cution in execution of a 
decree to be put into pos- 
session. 

156. — To set aside a sale in 
execution of a decree on the 
ground of irregularity in 
publishing or conducting 
the sale or on the ground 
that the decree-holder has 
purchased without the per- 
mission of the Court. 

157. — Complaining of resistance 
or obstruction to delivery 
of possession of immovable 
property decreed or sold in 
execution of a decree, or 
of dispossession in the delivery 
of possession to the decree- 
bolder or the purchaser of 
«uch proporty. 



Period of 
limitation 



30 days. 



60 days. 



Ditto 



Ditto ... 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



When the application for re- 
view is rejected. 



The date of the dismissal. 



any 
the 



The date of executing 
process for enforcing 
judgment. 

The date of the dispossession. 



Ditto ... The date of the sale. 



Ditto .J The date of the resistance, 
obstruction or dispossession. 



KATHIAWAB LIMITATION LAW. 



583 



Third Division: Applications. — continued. 



Description of suit. 



158.— For re-admission of an 
appeal dismissed for want of 
prosecution. 

159 — For a re-hearing of an 
appeal heard ex parte in the 
absence cf the respondent. 

160. — For leave to appeal as a 
pauper. 

161. — Under section 371 of 
the Code of Civil Procedure 
or under that section and 
Section 582 of the same 
Code for an order to set 
aside an order for abatement 
or dismissal. 

162. — By a purchaser at an 
execution sale to set aside 
the sale on the ground that 
the person whose interest in 
the property purported to be 
sold had no saleable interest 
therein. 

163. — For a review of judg- 
ment, or for the exercise of 
extraordinary jurisdiction . 

164. — For the issue of a notice 
under section 258 of the 
same Code to show cause 
why the payment or adjust- 
ment therein mentioned 
should not be recorded as 
certified. 

165 — By a creditor of on 
insolvent judgment debtor 
under section 353 of the 
Code of Civil Procedure.; 



Period of j 
limitation j 



Time from which period 



begins to run. 



60 days. 



Ditto 



Ditto 



4 months 



Ditto 



90 days. 



6 months. 



Ditto 



The date of the dismissal. 



The date of the decree in 
in appeal. 

The date of 'he decree ap- 
pealed against. 

The date of the order for 
abatement or dismissal. 



The date of the sale. 



The date of the 
order. 



decree or 



When the payment or ad- 
justment is made. 



The date of the publication 
of the sche'dule. 



584 



REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



Third Divisions Applications. — continued. 



Description of suit. 



Period of 
limitation 



166. — For payment of the 6 months, 
amount of a decree by ins- 
talments. 



16?.— Under section ?6*> of 
the Code of Civil Procedure 
by the legal representative 
of a deceased plaintiff, or 
under that section and sec 
tion 582 of the same Code 
by the legal representative 
of a deceased plaintiff ap- 
pellant or defendant-appellant 

168.— Under section 366 of 
the Code of Civil Procedure 
by a defendant, or under 
that section and section 582 
of the same Code by a 

Slaintiff respondent or defen- 
ant-respondent. 

169— Under section 368 of 
the Code of Civil Procedure 
to have the legal represen- 
tative of a deceased defendant 
made a defendant, or under 
that section and section 582 
of the same Code to have 
the legal representative of a 
deceased plaiatiff-respondent 
or defendent- respondent made 
a plaintiff respondent or 
defendant-respondent. 

170.— Under the Code of Civil 
Procedure, section 516 or 
525, that an award be filed 
in Court 

171. — Applications for which 
no ; period of limitation is 
provided elsewhere in this 
f chedule, or by the (ode of 
Civil Procedure, section 230, 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Ditto 



Time from which period 
begins to run 



The date of the decree. 



The date of the death of the 
deceased plaintiff or of the 
deceased plaintiff-appellant 

or defendant-appellant. 



Ditto 



5 years. 



The date of the death of the 
deceased plaintiff or of the 
deceased defendant appellant 
or plaintiff-appellant. 



The date of the death of the 
deceased defendant or of the 
deceased plaintiff respondeat 
or defendant respondent. 



The date of the award. 



When the right to appy cal- 
crues. 



KATHIAWAR* LIMITATION LAW. 

Thibb Division : Applications — continued. 



585, 



Description of suit. 



172. — For the execution o£ a 
decree or order of any civil 
Court not provided for by 
No. 173 or by the Code of 
Civil Procedure, section 230. 



Period of 
limitation, 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



Ditto, or 
where a 
certified 
copy of j 
the decree 
or order I 
has been I 
registered, 
six years. 



1. The date ot the decree or 
order. 

2. (Where there has been an 
appeal) the date of the final 
decree or order of the Ap- 
pellate Court, or 

3. (Where there has been a 
review of judgment) the date 
of the decision passed on 
the review, or 

4. (Where the application next 
hereinafter mentioned has 
been made) the date of ap- 
plying in accordance with 
law to the proper Court for 
execution, or to lake some 
step in aid of execution of 
the decree or order, or 

5. (Where the notice next 
hereinafter mentioned has 
been issued) the date o£ 
issuing a notice under the 
Code of Civil Procedure* 
section 248, or 

6. (Where the application is to 
enforce any payment which 
the decree or order directs 
to be made at a certain date) 
such date. 



Explanation I — Where the 
decree or order has been 
passed severally in favour 
of more yerpons than one, 
distinguishing portions of the 
subject- mailer as payable or 
deliverable io each, ihe ap- 
plicant lreniioned indause 
4 of tlif ♦Nrmler shall iiake 
eflect in favor r only of suck 
of the said persons or tiieir 



7* 



m 



BSWA KANTHA D1BBCT0RY. 

Third Division : Applications — oontinued. 



Description of suit. 



Period of 
limitation, 



17$.-<-To enforce an* order of 
tbe Secretary of State for 
IncKa in Council. 



12 years ,. 



Time from which period 
begins to run. 



representatives as it may be 
made by. But when the 
decree or order has been 
passed jointly in favonr o£ 
more persons than one, such 
application, if made by any 
one or more cf them, or by 
his or their representatives, 
shall take effect in favour 
of them all. 

Where the decree or order has 
been passed severally against 
more persons than one, dis- 
tinguishing portions of the 
subject-matter as payable or 
deliverable by each, the ap- 
plication shall take effect 
against only such of the said 
persons or their represen- 
tatives as it may be made 
against. But where the 
decree or order has been 
passed jointly against more 
pertons than one the ap- 
plication, if made against 
any one or more of them, 
or against his or their re- 
presentatives, shall take 
effect against them all. 

Explanation II. — " Proper 
Court " means the Court 
whose duty it is ( whether 
under section 226 or 227 oi 
the code of Civil Procedure 
or otherwise) to execute the 
decree or order. 



When a present right to 

force the order accrues to 

some person capable o£ 
releasing the right. 



Third Division: Appliicatons — continued. 



58T 



Description of suit. 



Period of 
limitation 



Time from which peroid 
begins to ran. 



Provided that when the order 
has been revived, or some 
part of the principal money 
secured thereby or some 
interest on such money has 
been paid or some ack- 
nowledgment of the right 
thereto has been given in 
writing, signed by the 
person liable to pay such 
principal or interest, or 
his agent, to the^ person 
entitled thereto or his agent, 
the twelve years shall be 
computed from the date of 
such revivor, payment or 
acknowledgment, or the 
latest of such revivors, pay- 
ments or acknowledgments, 
as the case may be. 






LIQUOR. 589 

liquor— Exemption from duty on transport from Rajpipla 

State. 

No. 9518. 

Bated the 15th October 1912. 

In exercise of the powers conferred by section II of 
the Bombay Abkari Act, 1878 (Bom. Act V of 1908), the 
Governor General in C3uncil is pleased to exempt from duty 
country liquor which has baen manufactured at Nandod 
distillery within the territory of His Highness the Raja of 
Rajpipla and which is transported from the said distillery 
through the intervening British territory to His Highness* 
liquor depot at Sogbara under permits for such transport 
signed by the Distillery Inspector, Nandod, subject to the 
following conditious, namely : — 

(1) The liquor shall be conveyed by the under men* 
tioned route :— 

From Nandod to Ankleshwar in the Broach District*, 
by the Rajpipla State Railway. 

From Ankleshwar to Surat, — by the main line of the 
Bombay, Baroda and Central India Railway. 

From Mandarbar to Sagbara, by road. 

(2) Each permit shall specify 

(a) The number and date thereof; 

(b) The name of the transporter ; 

(c) The name and description of the vessel coq- 
containing liquor : 

(d) The qnantity and strength of liquor contained 
in each vessel ; 

(e) The name of the places from and to which liquor 
is to be transported; 

(/) The mode of conveyance ; and * 

(g) The date upto which the permit shall hold 
good ; 



WO BBWA KAHTHA DIBECTOBY. 

(3) Liquor shall be taken in casks or kegs and' each 
such cask or keg slnll be securely closed and 
sealed and shall have marked on ib the quantity 
and strength of the liquor contained there : n. 

Note. — Similar exemption exists for Baria State Liquor — seepage 
383 supra. 



Political Department. 

Bombay Castle, 16th March 1920. 

No. 2282.— The following notification by the Govern- 
ment of India, Foreign and Political Department is repub- 
lished. 

"No. 565-G, dated Delhi, the 10th March 1920. 

Whereas jurisdiction to make an order for the deten- 
tion of any of their subjects who are, or who may hereafter 
become, lunatics has b3en transferred to the Governor Gene- 
ral in Council by the Darbars of the States named in the 
accompanying schedule. 

Now, therefore, the Governor-General in Council, in 
exercise of the powers conferred by the Indian ( Foreign 
Jurisdiction) order in Council, 1902, and of all other powers 
enabling him in this behalf, is pleased to prescribe the 
following prooadure for observance by Political officers in 

connection with the makiDg of order and warrants for the 
detention of lunatics from the said States in asylums in 

British India. 

1. In the case of a criminal lunatic, in respect of 
whom an order or warrant for detention in an asylum has 
been made or issued by a Court established under the 
authority of the Darbar of any of the said States, the 
Political officer may, on application by such Darbar, endorse 
such order or warrant for execution in an asylum in British 
India. 



LIQUOR. 



591 



2. In the ca3e of any other lunatic, in respeofa of 
whom an application to that effect has be°n made by any 
finch Darbar, the Political officer may make an order for 
the detention of such lunatic in an asylum in British India. 







SCHFDULE 






Name of State. 






Designation of 


Bombay Presidency- 




Political Officers. 


* 




* 


* 


Rajpipla ... 


••• 


.. . 


••• 




Balasinor 


••• 


• «• 


••• • 




Snnth 


... 


••• 


«•• 




Kadana ... 


••• 


... 


... 




Bhadarwa 


••• 


• •• 


... ^The Political Agent, 


Sanjeli ... 


... 


••• 


... 


Rewa Kantha. 


Umetha ... 


••• 


• •• 


•♦• 




Jambughoda 


••• 


... 


••• 




Savanir ... 


••• 


*♦# 


••• A 





J. B. WOOD, 
Secretary to Government 

of India. 



No. 2283. — The following notification by the Gonern- 
ment of India, Foreign and Political Department, is repub- 
lished: — 

No. 568-G, dated Delhi, the 10th Maroh 1920. 

In exercise of the powers conferred by section 99 of 
the Indian Lunacy Act, 1912 (IV of 1912), the Governer 
General in Council is pleased to make the following rules, 
regulating the procf dure for the reception and' detention id 
asylums in British India of lunatics whose reception and 
/detention are provided for by section ,98 of the said Act. 



502 



BBWA KANTHA BIBECTORY. 



1. All costs involved by the detention of any lunatic, 
who is a subject of a State in India, shall be chargeable to 
the State concerned. 

2. In the event of non- payment of sums due under 
the preceding rule on account of the detention of any lunatic, 
each lunatic shall be liable to discharge from the a?y!um, if 
three of the visitors of the asylum by order in writing so 
direct. 

3. Lunatics detained under these rules, who are sub- 
jects of any of the States mentioned in the first column the 
following table may be detained in the asylum, or one of 
the asylums, mentioned opposite thereto in the second CDlumn, 



TABLE. 



Name of State. 
Bombay Presidency. 

Bajpipla 

Balasinor 

Sunth ... *~* 

Kacfina ... ••• 

Bhadarwa 
Sanjeli ... 
Umetha ... 
Jambughoda 



Name of Asylum. 



1 



J Lunatic Asylum at 
y Ahmedabad. 



••• ••» •♦• J 

| Lunatic Asylum 
••• y at Ahmedabad. 
••• ••• ••' | 

••• •*• ••• J 

J. B WOOD, 

Secretary to tne Government 

of India. 

By order of His Excellency the Honourable 

the Governor in Council, 
» 

C. CRERAR, 
Secretary to Government, 



NOTIFICATION. No. 30 or 1885. 
The following revised rules regarding mail robberies in 

^Government Reso- NativQ States P rescrib9d b 7 the Gknr- 
lntion, Political Depart- ernment of India in their Resolution 

T nt tJL°\ 5U5 ! ?ot d ; n the Foreign Department No. 2495 
the 27th August 188o. f . . 

I, dated 29fch ultimo* in supersession 

of those laid down in their Resolution No. 1095, dated the 

18th July 1866, Foreign Department, and republished in 

the Kathiawar Agency Gazette No. 37, dated the 13th 

September 1866, are published for general information :— 

EDWARD W f WEST, Lt. Colonel, 

Political Agent. 
Kathiawar Political Agency, 
Hajkot, 1st September 1885. 

* * # * 

1. Every Native State is responsible for the secure 
passage through its territory of the Imperial Mail and parcel 
post; and every Native State in the territory of which the 
Imperial mail or parcel post is robbed is prim* facie liable. 

(1) To pay to the British Government the full value 
of whatever is taken or destroyed by the robbers; 
and 

(2) to pay such compensation as the British Govern- 
ment requires to carriers of the mail or other 
persons, or to their families, in the event of the 
carriers or other persons being injured cr killed in 
connection with the robbery. 

Explanations. 

(a) The term lf mail " includes any letter, parcel or 
other article conveyed under the provisions of the Indian 
Post Office Act XIV o£ 1866, as well as any box, bag, or 
other article, or any carriage, horse, messenger or other 
person, employed or used by the Post Office for the con* 
veyanoe or safe custody of mails. 

75 



S$l BBWA KANTHA BIBECTOBT. 

(6) No exemption shall be allowed ia estimating the 
above mentioned payment or compensation on account of 
bullion! jewellery or other articles of great intrinsic value, 

(c) This rule does not affect the liability of the British 
Post Office to make good, under its departmental rules of 
insurance, the value of insured articles committed to its 
charge. 

II. If a mail robbery is committed in the territory of 
one State, and the tracks of the robbers are traced into the 
territory of another State or States, and there lost, the 
prima facie liability for the robbery shall generally be shared 
in equal proportions by the State in which the robbery 
occurs, and the State or States into which the robbers are 
finally tracked. 

Explanation. 

This rule shall not be held to necessitate minute or in 
convenient apportionment of liability between several States; 
and if doubts or complications arise, the prima facie liability 
shall be held to rest upon the State in which the mail 
robbery may have been committed. 

III. A Native State, to whom the prima facie liability 
defined above attaches, may plead in extenuation thereof 
facts showing: — 

(1) That its police arrangements ara efficient, especially 
with regard to the protection of the mail routes 
passing through its territories; and that it has 
displayed zeal and energy in bringing, or in at- 
tempting to bring, the robbers to justice; 

(2) That the robbery was committed, without complicity 
on the part of any of its own subjects or contribut- 
ory negligence on the part of its own local autho- 
rities, by a servant of the British Post Office. 



/.. _ HQ0OBU ; ; ; v/ $f| 

Explanation. : . : . , ; 

The mere infrequency of mail robberies shall not 
alone be regarded as an extenuating circumstance, 
or as evidence o£ police efficiency. 

IV. The compensation paid hy Native States in dis- 
charge o£ the liability defined in Clause (1), and the 
balanoes of existing •« Mail Robbery Fund a," shall be credited 
to the miscellaneous revenue of the Post Office of India; 
and the Director General of the Post Office may at his 
discretion award to consignors or consignees the whole or 
part of compensation payments to make good loss caused 
by the robbery of articles which are neither insured nor of 
great intrinsic value, 

V. If, owing to the inefficiency of the protective 
system in any Native State, mail robberies are allowed to 
become frequent and to remain unpunished, the Government 
of India, or the Local Government, may, in addition to the 
enforcement of the pecuniary liability above defined, require 
the State to take such measures as may appear necessary 
and desirable for securing the safety of the mail; and, in the 
default of the State, may cause such measures to be carried 
out by Government Agency at the expense of the State, 

(A true extract) 

H. M. DURAND, 

Secretary to the Government of India, 



5M MWA KAKTHA DlftHCTOBY. 

Medical attendance. 

No, 1192. 

<X)VERNMENT OF INDIA. 

Home Department. 
MEDICAL. 

Calcutta, the 20th December 1911. 

NOTIFICATION, 

In supersession of the orders contained in the Home 
Department Notification No. 607 dated the 1st July 1907, 
and of all existing orders on the subject, the Governor 
General in Council is pleased to make the following rules, 
which will be applicable to British India and Native States, 

regarding the receipt by Medical officers of Government of 
fees (including honoraria or presents which may be offered 
for services rendered, for professional services, whether for 
any ordinary visit, or consultation, or confinement, or asur- 
gical operation, in certain cases :— 

(1) Whenever attendance oa a Ruling Chief or his 
family or dependents, or on an Indian of posi- 
tion who holds a hereditary title conferred or 
recognized by Government, of rank now below 
that o£ Raja or Nawab, or his family or depen- 
dents, involves the absenoa of a Medical Offiser 
from his station, he shall be permitted to demand 
or receive such fees as may be arranged between 
himself and the person employing him, provided 
that he does not, without the special permission 
of the Local Government, obtained as provided 
below, demand or receive in addition to his 
travelling expenses, a higher fee than Us. 500 
a day for the first three days and Rs. 250 * 
_ . day thereafter, the foil daily fee being gtoa 



XBDIC4I* ATJEHDAHCB. $$f 

for every complete period of 24 hours' absence 
with a proportionate fee for periods of leas than 
24 hours. 

(2) For similar attendance not involving absence 
from his head quarters a medical officer may 
demand or receive fees in accordance with the 
scale which he has fixed for his patients 
generally, 

(3) Before accepting or demanding from a Ruling 
Chief or Indians of positions as referred to in rale 
(1) a fee in excess of the rates laid down ia 
rules (1) and (2) above, a medical officer must 
report the case confidentially to the local 
administrative medical officer, who will obtain 
unofficially, and communicate to him, the 
orders of the local Government. When taking 
the orders of Government the administrative 
medical officer will be careful not to disclose any 
of the medical particulars of the case. 

(4) Local Governments and administratives shall 
have full powers to dispose of all cases so re- 
ported to them but shall be at liberty to consult 
the Director General Indian Medical service, or 
to refer any particular case for the orders of 
the Government of India. 

(5) Fees for operations and confinements may be 
accepted equal in amount to those current ia 
similar circumstances in the profession in the 
United Kingdom. 

2. The Home Department Notification No. 100 dated 
the 2nd February 1911 is hereby cancelled. 

A. EARLE, 

Secretary to fhe Government 

of India* 



$9& BEtf A KANTHA DIBKCTOBY. 

Medical attendance. 

RESOLUTION. 

The papers read above to medical attendance on, and 
supply of medicine to Government Clerks and their fomilie?. 
Doubts have arisen as to the applications of these orders in 
case of certain officers, the Governor General in Council is 
pleased to prescribe the following rules in supersession of all 
previous orders on the subject with effect from the 1st 
January 1885. 

(1) All clerks of all Government offices are entitled 
to gratuitous, medical attendance and medicines 
for themselves. 

(2) All clerks of Army head-quarters are entitled 
• to similar privileges for themselves and their 

families. 

(3) Subject to the above rules, clerks drawing Rs., 
250 per mensem and upwards are entitled to 
the services of the Civil Surgeon, and those 
drawing less than that amount to the service 
of the Assistant Surgeon or medical subordinate 
provided for the purpose, it being understood 
that, in confirmity with Paragraph 4 of circular 
letter dated 31st August 1889 above quoted, 
the attendance of the Civil Surgeon should be 
given in all cases of emergency or of great 
danger of difficulty, when applied for by the 
subordinate medical attendant. 

Memorial rules* 

Bombay Castle, 23rd August 1915. 

No. 503 1; — The following notification by the Govern- 
ment of India, Foreign and Political Department, is re- 
published :— 
■ ■ ;•- No. 1367 a, dated Simla, the 10th August 1915, 



■1 

VBKOBIAL BULEB* 909 

With referenoe to the notification of the Government* 
of India, in the Foreign Department, No. 1606 G., dated 
the 29th July 1910, the following revised section of the 
Folitioal Department Memorial Rules is published tor 
general information : — 

II. Memorials, etc., addressed to His Majesty the 
King Emperor of India, or to the Secretary of State for 
India. 

1. Every memorial must be submitted to the Political 
Officer of the State within whose jurisdiction the subject 
matter has arisen, accompanied by a copy of the order 
appealed against and by a letter requesting its transmission 
to the authority to which it is addressed. 

2. Memorials may be transmitted either in manuscript 
or in print, but must with all accompanying doonments, bo 
properly authenticated by the signature of the memorialist 
in each sheet. 

3. Subject to the exceptions hereinafter contained, 
every memorial received which confirms to the above rules 
should be forwarded by the Political Officer through the 
usual official ohannel with a concise statement of material 
facts, and, unless there be special reasons to the contrary, 
an expression of opinion. 

4. Memorials, together with their accompanying 
documents, should be in English. If the accompanying 
documents must necessarily forwarded in the vernacular, an 
English translation should be appended, which should be 
attested by the signature of the memorialist on each sheet. 

N.B. — The transmitting officer should examine suck 
translations, and if they are found too be in oorrect or faulty, 
notice the fact in sending on the memorial. 

5. Every memorial should be accompanied by copiee 
of all the orders passed in the case by the authorities who 
have dealt with it in India. 



©5$ BEWA KAKTHA DIBJ5CT0B*. 

6. Local Governments, administration?, and Political* 
Officers in direct subordination to the Foreign and Political 
Department of the Government of India are vested with 
discretionary powers to withhold memorial addressed to His 
Majesty or the Secretary of State in the following cases: — 

(1) When the memorial is illegible or unintelligible. 

(2) When the memorial contains language which, in 
the opinion of the authority who would otherwise 
forwarded it, is disloyal, disrespectful or improper. 

(3) When a previous petition of the memorialist 
(which term includes a rejoinder submitted by the 
memorialist in answer to a previous petition of 
some other party), has been disposed of by the 
Secretary of State, and the petition discloses no 
new facts or circumstances which afford ground for 
a reconsideration of the case. 

(4) When the memorialist has not previously appealed 
to the Government cf India ( or the Government 
of Madras, Bombay or Bengal, as the case may 
be) and received the decision of the Governor 
General (or Governor) in Council upon it. 

(5) When the memorial is an appeal preferred more 
than si# months after the date on which the 
memorialist was informed of the orders against 
which he appeals, provided that the Local Gove- 
rnment, Administration, or Political officer, as 
the case may be, may, at their or his discretion, 
extend the extend the period to twelve months, if 
the delay will facilitate a settlement of the dispute, 
or other good cause is shown. 

* Political Officers who are not Heads o£ Local Administrations 
may not exercise discretionary power to withhold memorials o£ the 
kind referred to in clause (7) and (8) of Rule 6. 



memorial kujjis. ^ 501 

(6) When the memorial refers to matters in which 
the memorialist is not personally interested. 

(7) When the memorial is in effect is an appeal in a 
boundary cape between Native States in which 
the decision, original or appellate, of the Political 
officer has been passed after enquiry on the spot 
and confirmed on appeal by the Locsl Government 
Local Administration or the Government of India, 
as the case may be. 

(8) Cases which turn entirely on questions of fact, 
where the Political Officer and Local Government 
or Local Administration are in agreement. 

7. Provided they do not contravene the conditions 
specified in the preceding section, memorials which ara 
appeals against orders passed by the Governor General in 
Council (or Governor in Council in Madra3, Bombay or 
Bengal as the case may be) in the exercise of political 
control in territories not included in British India, shall bs 
forwarded, except in *«he following casas in which a discre- 
tionary power to withhold the memorial may be exercised: 

*(1) When the order appealed against has been passed 
by the Government of India, Madras, Bombay or 
Bengal (as the case may be), as a recognised Court 
of Appeal in regard to a judgment or order of 
any Court of Civil or Criminal jurisdiction esta- 
blished or continued by the Governor General ia 
Council in such territories. 

* Note to Rule 7 (1) o£ Section I and II. — Memorials which 
are practically appeals for mercy or pardon must be transmitted. But 
their transmission will not affect the discretion in regard to capital 
sentences allowed to Local Governments and Administrations by th> 
the Home Department Resolution No. 20-1403-13,' dated the 14th 
October 188 5, as modified by Foreign Department Circular letter No# 
$289-I.B„ dated the 30th August 1901., 

76 



4C£ BBWA KAKTHA P1BBCT0BT. 

(2) When the order appealed against is a mere refusal 
to exercise political control in regard to a judgment 
or order of any special Court established by the 
Governor General in Council in such territories, 
from which Court there is, by its constitution, no 
appeal, though a general political control over it 
is declared or understood to exist. 

(3) When the order appealed against is a mere 
refusal to interfere in a matter of purely internal 
policy with the action 'or orders of the Ruler of 
a Native State, of which the memorialist is a 
subject : provided that the sfate is one in which 
it is not customery for the British Government to 
intervene in matters of internal policy, and that* 
the matter complained of does not disclose a 
state of misrule so gross that the Paramount 
Power would be called upon to interfere. 

JV m B. — This rule applies to a temporary AdministratiDm 

established in a Native State by the Governor- 
General in Council when the temporary Adminis- 
tration is appointed to exarcise the same powers 
and occupy the same position as the Native 
Administration which it supersedes. 

8. Memorials for persons* in such territories which 

are not covered by these rules, may b* 

* E.;G- petitions from treatec [ unc [ er t h e memorial rules of 

Government servants 

about dismissal, pen- the Home Department wh9n they are 

sions, etc. applicable. 

9. The following special rules, apply to the case of 
appeals against the orders of the Government of Bombay: — 

(1) In tho following cases the decision of tie Local 
Government shall ordinarily be considered as final, 
a i appeal to thq Secretary of State for India 



MEMOBIAL RULES. 60$ 

only being admissible with the permission of the 
Local Government, which should be previously 
obtained: — 

(a) Giras cases in States of Classes I to IV in 
Kathiawar, which would have been tried by 
the fUjasthanik Court when it existed, buo 
are now tried by the States Hazur Courts 
from whose decision an appeal lies to the 
Agency and to the Local Government. 

(6) Giras cases in States below Class IV in 
which the decision of the Agent to the 
Governor, Kathiawar, is at present final 
under the rules sanctioned in Government 
Resolution No. 6511, dated the 18th Novem- 
ber 1898, subject to the general political 
control of the Local Government. 

(c) Cutch Jadeja Court cases, 

2. Memorialists who desire to appeal against the 
orders of the Government of Bombay, in political cases shall 
have the option of addressing such appeals either to the 
Government of India or t:> the Secretary of State and such 
appeal shall be forwarded subject to the provisions of Rules- 
6 and 7. When in the exercise o£ this option an appeal 
has been presented to the Government of India, no further 
appeal shall be to the Secretary of State. This rule shall 
not apply to — 

(a) Appeals in Giias oases or in those which are 
specially covered by any of the foregoing rules; 

(6) Memorials of the class specially reserved in Rule 
IV of the rules published with Home Department 
Notification No. 148 (public), dated the 19th 
January 1905 ; 

(c) Memorials which involve questions affecting the 
status, dignity or powers of a Ruling Chief or hi& 



*oi 



BBWA KAKTHA DIRECTORY. 

relations with the Paramount Power ( including 
questions of succession or adoption) and with other 
Chiefs. 

J. B. WOOD, 
Secretary to the Government 

of India. 
By order of His Excellency the Right 

Honourable the Governor in CouuciL 
L. ROBERTSON, 
Secretary to Government. 



Compendium of Proceedings, General Rules and Special Rules 
of the Mewas Hitkarni Sabha. 

1st Mewas Darbar* 

The first Mewas Darbar was held on 21-4-1909 at 
Mandwa under the Presidentship of the then Political Agent, 
R. C. Brown, Esquire, I. C. S., for the social and economic 
amelioration of the Sankheda Mewas Thakors and their 

Ryots. 

Some 12 questiDns were then mooted ; — 

(1) Direct service of notices etc and direct recovery 
of outstanding revenue dues. 

(2) Fire line between two jungles and -mutual help in 
case fo tire. 

(3) Injurious customs involving extravagant expanses 
among the Molesalams and Rajputs to be done away with, 
e.g. ia Sunta, Satwasa, pregnancy and funeral expenses. 

(4) Measures for relief of cultivators from thQ clutches 
of Sowkars. 

(5) Rights for building houie si&es or sale thereof 
to fce given to Ryots. 



MEWAS DARBAB. 60S 

(6) Jungles preservation etc. of and outting at long 
intervals etc. 

(7) Measures for curtailment of marriage expenses e.g. 
Kesar Pathan ornaments for bride, men to be taken in pro- 
cession &c. 

(8) Polygamy to be stopped. 

(9) Waste lands-cultivation of. 

(10) Mines and minerals developemeni. 

(11) Education-by opening new schools and free in 
villages. 

(12) General;-e.g. Talukdars to maintain Budget System. 
Funeral and after death expenses to be reduced by curtailment 
of certain expenses in dinners, Bethi Jarat, Ghee Lota, 
Jarat etc., Improvement of cultivators by introducing of 
survey, receipt books, Takavi etc. 

Then the matter seems to have ended. 

2nd Me was Darbar. 

The next (2nd) Darbir wag held on 23-1-13 at Wadia 
by the then Political Agent, H. B. Clayton, Esquire, I.C.S., 
when opportunity was taken to impress upon the Thakors 
the necessity of curtailment of carmonial expenses of giving 
to their Ryats some fixity of land teaure and improvement) 
in methods of land revenue assessment and of improving 
the general tone of thair mana^jmeab of their estate with 
a view to securing the prosperity of the Ryot3 under tha 
altered conditions of life. 

A Sub-Committee was than appointed consisting of 
certain Thakors and Agency Officials and Non-Otfieials to 
deal with the curtailmant of ceremonial expenses. 

3rd Mewas Darb&r. 

A 3rd Daroar was held at Wadia on 19-3-14 under 
the Presidentship of C. W. M, Hudson, Esquire I, & 3.* 
Political Agent Rewa Kantha* 



COS BBWA KAHTHA DIBECTOBY. 

The Sub-Committee appointed last year had under the 
chairmanship of Mr. Narayanlal the Thandar met on 1-3-14 
and did the following business; — 

(1) Kesar Pathan to be taken in proportion to the 
revenue of the Taluka from Rs. 25 to 500 but this does 
not give right to receive or pay it where there is no custom 
to do so. 

(2) Persons to be taken in marriage procession ( Jan) 
at the house of the bride's father as per following scale. 

If the revenue of the bride's No> of men to be allowed 

father be Rs, 

100 5 

1000 50 

5000 125 

10000 and above 250 

This number should not exceed on any account 

(3) Persons to be taken by Thakors going as guests 
on marriage occasions in proportion to the revenue of their 
own Talukas according to the following scala. 

If the revenue be Rs. No. of men to be allowed. 

100 1 

1000 5 

5000 15 

10000 and abave 30 

This number is not to exceed on any account, 

(4) Tyag is not to be given to Bhats, Charans etc. 
on marriage occasions, following the example of the Vajiria 
Thakor. 

As these proposals were however mo3tly made and 
supported by officials and non-officials, advisers and certain 
communities were not represented therein in the General 
Committee, th$ Thakors of Vasan Virpur and Jiral Kamsoli 
objected to certain of these proposals ; The Thakor Mota- 



XEWA8 DARBAR. 607 

bava of Jiral Kamsoli (a Ghori) was then appointed by the 
President Mr. Hudson a Member of tha General Committee 
and Sub Committee and these proposals (or special rule3) 
were put back for further consideration by the Sub-Corn* 
mifctee. 

Tne District Deputy Assistant Political Agent Mr. 
Chhaganlal G. Mehta then re<*d the General Rales, revised 
by Mr, Hudson, before the General Committee about the 
terminology of the Sabha as Mewas Hitkarui Sabha", its 
constitution, formatiou o£ members of General and Mana^'mof 
Committee, their duties, powers, period of meeting etc. 

These general rules were unanimously passed, and 
confirmed by the President Mr. Hudson. 

These are subjoined:— 

The following general rules are adopted with a view 
to the necessity for curtailment of ceremonial expenses among 
the Thakors in the Me was Rewa Kantha Agency and for 
improvement of their social and economic conditions. 

1. A general Committee be formed for the purpose 
and be known as Me was Hitkarni Sabha. 

It should consist of- 

f resident: — Political Agent, Rewa Kantha Agency. 

Vice-President: — Deputy Assistant Political Agent, 
Rewa Kantha, 

Members : — 

Molesalams: — 1. Kesarkhanji Thakor of Vajiria. 

2. Motabava Bhaibava Thakor of Nan- 

gam (Representatives of the Rathod 
clan appointed by majority of -votes). 

3. Jitamia Bahadarbava Thakor of 

Uchad. » 

4. Gambhirsingji Biaibava Thakor of 

Virpur ( Representatives o£ tba> 



<w 



BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 



6. 



Mvsalmans: — 7. 



Hindu Rajputs: — 8. 



9. 



10. 



11. 



12. 



13. 



Daema community appointed by 
majority of votes). 

Gambhirkhanji Sardarkhanji Thakor 
of Agar ( Representatives of the 
Chohan community appointed by 
majority of votes). 

Sahebkhan Kesarkhan Thakor of 
Pantalvdi (Representatives of the 

Padhiar clan appointed by majority 

of votes). 

Motabava Hafibava Thakor of Jiral 
Kamsoli (Representatives of the 
Ghori community appointed by 
majority of votes). 

Chandrasingji Bharatsingji, Thakor 
of Gad Boriad. 

Vakbatsingji Khusalsingji Thakor of 
Sanor (Representatives of Choli&n 
Rajputs community appointed by 
majority of votes). 

Mansingji Nrapatsingji Thakore of 
Naswadi. (Representatives of Solanki 
Rajputs community appointed by 

majority of votes). 

Motisingji Haribava Tbakar of 
Bhilodia. 

Prabhatsingji Mithabava Thakor of 
Rampuja. ' Representatives of 

Chavda Rajputs community ap- 
pointed by majority of votes). 

Fatesingji Jitsingji Thakor of 
Palasni. (Representatives otParmav 
Rajputs community appointed by 
majority of votes. 



ijrarrris biafcAK. 60$ 

14. All non-jurisdictiona! tributary 
Talukdars. 

Officials and non»$ facials Advisers. 

15. Tnandar of Wadia. 

16. Manager, Mandwa State. 

17. Head Master Talukdari School. 

18. Mr. Phirozshah J. Gin walla. 
29. Mr. Damodardas Vallabhram. 

2. The Political Agent and President may vary the 
members from time to time as he thinks proper or may add 
to their number or reduce it. 

3. The General Committee will meet at least once * 
year at the time and place appointed by the President. 

4. A Managing Committee sh*ll be formed of:— 

C%airman:Thanadar Wadia. 

Members:— Nos. 1 to 13, 16, 18 and 19 of the General 
Committee. 

The President may vary the members at 
per rule 2 above. 

If tbe District Deputy Assistant Politbal 
Agent Rewa Kantha be moving at the 
time in Mewas and be free he may preside 
in this Sub-Committee- 

5. This Sub Committee will meet at least twice a 
year. The Chairman will give due notice of the meetings. 

Before the Committee is called to meet at a certain 
time and place, members should be given ample notice say a 
month of the business to be transacted ( i. e. points for 
discussion) so as they can sound sectional opinion and repre- 
sent it adequately and authoritatively at tbe meeting. 

6. At least SO per cent of the members trill form a 
quorum. 

77 



£19 BBWA KAHTHA DIBECTOKY. 

7. The Resolutions in both the Committee will be 
passed according to a majority of votes. In case of equal 
votes the President or Chairman, as the case may be, will 
have a casting vote. 

That Rajputs shall not vote on mat tars affecting Maho- 
medar.8 only and vice versa. 

8. The Snb-Comtnittee will discuss and settle the 
points mooted in the time of Mr. Brown in the year 1909, 
and others that may be brought before the Committee or 
suggested by the members or Thakors etc. and submit the 
Resolutions for the approval of the President of the 
General Cotninittea through the Vice-President. 

If any member be unavoidably absent the Chairman 
should make it a point to keep hiai informad of ths Pro- 
ceedings. 

9. The President will thereafter call a meeting of the 
General Committee and the Resolutions passed there at will 
be final. 

10. The Resolutions will be binding on all the mem- 
bers and all the Thakors of the Me was, 

11. The responsibility attache* to the Chairman and 
the Members (as taay reprjsant all clans oE Rajputs and 
Mahomadans ). 

(a) to ascertain and bring to notica any infringement 
of the Resolutions finally passed. 

(6) to have these Resolutions properly put into exe- 
cution by all concerned. 

12. Unofficial advice will be given whenever sought 
for, by the .Political Agent and the JDeputy Assistanb in 
this cmc ion (Rule 11 (bj ). 

13. No question will be allowed to be reopened after 
it is (iiirtliy passed, by the General Committee except in very 
rare and exceptional cases in which case it will be first 
referred bo the Sub-Committee. 



MBWAS DAftBAB. 611 

14. Copy of the final Resolutions and Proceedings 
should be supplied to each of the members and to all the 
tributary Thakors of the Mewas for their guidance 

15. For necessary expenses, each member is requested 
to subscribe 8 annas. The Thandar will keep an account of 
all expenditure and report to the President through the 
Vice President and no expense is to be incurred without the 
written permission of the President. 

16. The subject of making additions and alterations, 
if any in the Rules and Resolutions will rest with the General 
Committee. 

4th Mewas Darbar. 

A 4th Darbar was held at Wadia on 27th February 
1915 under the Presidentship of the same officer, C. W. M. 
Hudson, Esquire, I. O. 8., Political Agent, Rewa Kantha. 

He addressed the Darbaris on the subjects of Abkari 
compensation, central roads in the Mewas, Talukdari school 
Qodhra congratulated Kesarkhanji Thakor of Vajiriv on h:s 
having been granted by Government the Kai3ari-Hind silver 
medal and Mansingji Thakor of Naswadi on his having been 
invested with additional Judicial powers and gave advice 
to the Thakors generally on thy subject of these Rules. 

Mr. Chhcsganlal the District Deputy Assist tnt Political 
Agent then addressed the assembly on the subjict cf the 
special Rules as set forth below and accorded most whole 
hearted thinks to Mr. Hudson for having placed tiiis Sabh% 
on a more practical and solid basis and Mrs. Hudsju for 
her having taken keen interest in the welfare of the MeWiS 
Thakranis. 

During the course of the current year, two sub- 
committees were held by the Vice President Mr. Chhaganlal 
G. Mehta and by tha Chairman Mr. D. D. Bhabha and 
the results achieved were as under: — 



41$ t RBWA KANAKA DIRECTORY. 

All the distinct communities of the Mtfsalmans and 
Molesalams and of Rajputs have unanimously agreed to do 
away with the following injurious and extravagant customs 
amongst them :~ 

Musalmans and Molesalams. 

(1) Sunta ( Circumcision ) expenses and invitations* 

Sunat is a religious ceremony which does not require 
lavish expense, still for the sake of ' Abru ' ( reputation ) 
extravagant expenses are incurred. This should be stopped 
and expenses should be incurred only within limits and means 
but not so lavishly as on occasions of marriagas Again no 
special man is to be deputed to make special invitations for 
the purpose but invitation notes may be sent to near 
kinsmen and friends. 

(2) Sathi. — The extravagant custom of distributing 
Jalebi (sweetmeat) on the sixtieth (60th) day of the de- 
ceased is not sanctioned by Shastras and should be stopped 

(3; Satwasa ( Pregnancy ). 

It is the custom to distribute u Methi Ladoos " (sweet- 
balls) but it is extravagant ani should be stopped. R ligbus 
seremoay should be performed oa this occasion and l£ 
maund of molasses be distributed to these present as aa 
auspicious sign. 

(4) Jarat.— will be performed on the 10th day instead 
of on the 3rd day of the deceased and the pernicious cust3m 
of fillicg up vessels with Ghee and giving them to JBhita, 
Mrs, etc. at the time of dinner should be stopped. 

(5) The undesirable custom of allowing the Loondas 
(menials) Mirs, Bhats, Bhands, etc. to sit at dinner with 
the Thakors and their Bhayats should be done away with 
and in future 'they should be made to sib- separately for the 
purpose. 



HINDU BAJPUTJ5. &1& 

Hindu Rajputs. 

The custom of Polygamy is pernicious and should be 
done away with, and subject to the following conditions;— 

(a) on failure of a mile issue. 

(6) in case of incurable disease of the wife. 

(c) in case of any other grava cause for disunion 
no one should marry a second wife. 

The duties and responsibilities of the Chairman and 
representative members to put the above special rules properly 
into effect and to bring to notice any infringement thereof 
under Rule 11 of the General Rules was also then brought) 
to notice by Mr. G. G. Mehta and gratitude was also ex* 
pressed to the representative Thakors for thus assisting in 
the cause of their own amelioration during the short tima 
at their disposal with a sincere hope that they would continue 
to be so persevering and energetic in future. 

Most whole-hearted and pious wishes were also expressed 
on behalf of this General Sibba for a speedy and successful 
termination ot the present disastrous European war ia 
favour o£ Great) Britain anl her allies. 

The Thakor of Vajiria then nude a short speech. 

The Special Rales were formally sanctioned at tha 
Darbar and the Darbar was then dissolved. 

a HUDSON, 

Political Agent, Rewa Kan tha. 

Godhra, 28th June 1915. 



<14 BEWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

Mukhtiars* 

No. 2065 of 1219. 

Bewa Kantha Agency Ofeice, 

17 th June 1912. 

NOTIFICATION. 

The attention of the Agency officers is drawn to 
Government Resolution No. 5829 dated 6th September 1910, 
Political Department, under which the powers of appoint- 
ment of Mukhtiars, as also of cancellation, and suspension of 
their sanads rest with the Political Agent. In future there- 
fore no such sanads should be issued by any Court without 
previous sanction being obtained fr< m the Political Agent. 
If through ignorance such sanads have already been granted 
by any Court since the issue cf the Government Resolution, 
the names of the persons holding the same together with 
their qualifications and character should be reported to 
undersigned. 

J. GKOSAL 

Political Agent, Rewa Kantha. 



Newspapers— publication of— 

No. 5153. — The following Notification by the Govern- 
ment of India in the Foieign Department is republished for 
general information:— 

Simla, the 25th June 1891, 

No. 2651, L — An order respecting the publication of 
newspapers and other printed works in places administered 
by the Governor General in Council, but not forming part of 
British India. 

Whereas some misapprehension has hitherto existed as 
to the regulations in force in territories under the adminis* 
tration of the Governor General in Council bat beyond the 



KEWSPAPBB. 615 

limits of British India, with reference to newspapers pub- 
lished within such territory, the Governor General in Council 
has been pleased to make the following orders. 

1. No newspaper or other printed work, whether 
periodical or other, containing public news or comments upon 
public news, shall, without the written permissi >n for the 
time being in force of the Political Agent, be edited, 
printed, or published after tin 1st day of August 1891 in 
any local area administere I by the Governor General in 
Council, but not forming part of British India. 

2. If after the day aforesaid any person shal J , w'thoub 
such permission as aforesaid, edit, print or publish any such 
newspaper or other wor v as aforesaid in any such local area 
as aforesaid, the Political Agent may by order in writing— 

(a) require him to leave such local area within seven 
days from the date of such order and 

(b) prohibit him from re-entering such local area 
without the written permission of the Political 
Agent. 

3. If any such order as is mentioned in the . last 
foregoing paragraph be disobeye 1, the offender shall be liable 
to forcible expulsion from such local area in pursuance of an 

order to be made in writing by the Political Agent. 

4. Any written permission granted by a Political 
Agent for the editing, printing or publishing of any such 
newspaper or other work as aforesaid may at any time be 
withdrawn by the Political Agent or any of bis successors 
in office* 

5. The expression €< Political Agent v has in thesa 
orders the meaning assigned thereto by the Foreign juris- 
diction and Extradition Act, 1879, and the Code of Criminal 
Procedure, 1882. 

H- M. DURAND. 
Secretary to the ^Government of India. 



€16< BIWJl kantha directory, 

New villages*— near Baroda territory to be reported. 

CIRCULAR. 

No. 1407 of 1901. 

Godhra, 10th July 1901. 

Under instructions from Government it is noti6ed to 
al States and Government officers under this Agency that 
all cases in which it is proposed to create new settlements 
within 1320 yards of the Baroda frontier should be reported 
to this office with a view to the necessary intimation being 
made to the Baroda Darbar through Government. 

P. K. CADELL, 

Political Agent. 

Cpiunif 

Notification of the Governor of Bombay in Council of 6th 
May 1874 (published in the Bombay Government Gazette 
for 1874, Part I % 298) declaring the Native States in the 
Bombay Presidency to be foreign territories for the purposes 
of Act XI of 1869 and that opium passing into or out of 
the said States is liable to the duty proposed by British 
Indian law. 

Under section 4 of Act XI of 1869, an Act to make 
better provision for the collection of land customs on certain 
foreign frontiers of the Presidencies of Fort St. George and 
Bombay, the Honourable the Governor in Council is pleased 
to declare the Native States in this Presidency as given in 
the annexed list, to be foreign territories for the purposes of 
the said Act, and that all opium passing into or out of the 
said States and territories is liable to the duty specified in 
Schedule A of Act XIII of 1871 or any other law for the 
time being in force relating to the duties of customs on 
goods imported and exported by sea. 



OPIUM. tit* 

Rewa Kantha. 
Rajpipla. Babsinor. Devgad Bariya. 

Sunth. Lunawada. Chhota Udepur. 

and 53 petty States. 



( Translation frcrn Gujrati ) 
Nos. 1520-22 of 1879 
To 

The Thanadars of the Agency, 

In pursuance of Bombay Government Resolution No. 
1964 dated 26th April 1879, on the subp;-t of opium, the 
following instructions are issued:— You must have asquainted 
all the Talukdars of Mewas with the opium Act and the 
rules therennder. However you should again issue fresh 
orders and inform them that, in return for the duty remitted 
by Government and the pro6t thereof given over to them, 
they should be always careful to stop the importation of 
smuggled opium into or through their territories, and to 
find out if any person has concealed any opium. And 
the larger Talukdars shou ! d make arrangements to detect 
and seiz^ such opium through thek Karkuns and sepoys, 
and to send the same to the Thana, and should instruct 
Patels, Havaldars &c., of villages under them to do the 
same. Similarly thay should see ttut licensed vendors of 
opium sell it according to (he rules of Government; ani if 
they suspect any irregularity, they should report the matter 
to the Thana, with the evidence they may be able to collect* 
If any Talukdar is found to be careless or negligent in doing 
as stated above, Government will punish them properly. 
You should wtite orders to this effect and personally inform 
thfcin of the above. You should also instruct your > Sowars, 
Karkuns and Japtidars t) always inquire and* find out if 
there are any inegularities as stated above aud to inform 
you of the same with ^ropfs; they should also be told thai 
78 



618 BBWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

if tfrey successfully prove any irregular importation or 
possession of opium, they will be rewarded in proportion to 
the value of the seized opium. And you, too, shouli have a 
keen eye on such matters, and report h re as to what you 
have done in this behalf. Dated 6-3-1879. 



( Iransla'ion from Gujrati) 

Nos. 1677 1689 of 1879. 
To, 

The Chiefs. Thakors and Thanadars of Rewa Kantha. 

In pursuance of Shero No. 47 dated 8ch May 1879 
from the Commissioner N. D , giving CO ver to an ex'raeb 
from a letter from the Commissioner of Customs, Opium, 
and Abkari, I have the honour to state that in the new 
arrangements regarding opium GDVernment duty will ba 
remitted on opium required for consumption in the State, 
and compensation will be fix^d regarding transit duty formerly 
taken on opium passing thro-igh your st^te and it will be 
included ia trie amount to be given to you. You should not 
therefore levy transit duty on opium passing through your 
state either from British territories or any other State when 
it is covered by a Government Pass. Proper arrangements 
in this direction should be made in your state and a report 
made to this office. Dated 2 1st May 1879. 



( Translation from Gujarati. ) 
Nos. 2659 to 2671 of 1879. 

To, 

The Principal Chiei s and Officers of Rewa Kantha. 

I have received Boa bay Government Resolution 
( Political Department ) No. 3885 dated 22nd July 1879, 
giving cover to a copy of Revenue Department Resolution 
No. 3620 dated 10th July 1889, wherdn the following 
instructions have been laid down for the disposal of coa* 
traband opium seized in Native State*. 



opium. i%9 

The Political Agent, Kathiawar, had in 1820 A. D. 
settled with the Chiefs of Kathiawar that J of the v due 
of seized contraband opium should be given to the person 
effecting the seizure and J to be retained by the State in 
whose limits the seizure is mad 3. This course is also at 
present followed where the chiefs or their servans of the 
State have taken part in the seizure of such opium, and it 
appears that the same eastern prevails at Radhanpur, It is 
apparent that this i3 a £ood practice. Therefore it should 
be followed in all the Native States. 

It is further directed that if the opium thus seized is 
inferior and useless and if the same be therefore destroyed, 
there is no necessity for giving a large rewirl for seizing it; 
a reasonable sum may however be givan to the person seizing 
it from the fine which may be levied from the person from 
whose possession the contraband opium has been found. 

The above is the order of Government. Therefore you 
should make arrangements to adopts the above course in yoi r 
State and should issue Notifications informing the people of 
such reward to be given to persons finding out smuggled 
opium. So that by the hope of reward people may be indue id 
to be careful in this matter. This will be beneficial to both. 
After making due arrangement? as stated above you will 
kindly send an early reply. Dated 29th July 1879. 



Opium Regulations sanctioned in G. R. 7207 of 18th 
September 1895 and adopted by Hie Native States and 
enforced in the Thana Circles. 

1. Opium includes also gre^n poppy heads, preparations 
or admixtures of opium and intoxicating drugs prepared 

from the poppy. 

.» 

2. The cultivation of the poppy or the manufacture 
of opium within the territory of the State is prohibited. 



'■■ €10 REWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

3. The import of op ; um from any place outside the 
State limits is prohibited, except under a pas3 signed by the 
Political Agent. 

4. The export of any opium to any place outside the 
State limits is prohibited, except) under a pass signed by the 
Political Agent. 

5. The transport from one ptace to another within 
the State limits of any quantity of opium exceeding in 
weight such maximum quantity as the Darbar has under- 
taken to prescribe is prohibited, except une'er cover of a 
permit granted by a duly authorized officer. 

6. Except as provided in Clauses 7 and 8, (i) no 
person shall have in his possession any opium other than 
opium purchated from the Darbar or from a farmer or 
licensed vendor (ii) no person not being a farmer or licensed 
vendor, shall have in his possession more than such maximum 
quantity of opium as the Darbar has undertaken t3 prescribe 

7. clause 6 does not apply to — 

( i ) opium in transit covered by a permit under 
Clause 5. 

(ii) opium imported according to rule during transit 
to its destination. 

8. There may be granted (a) to any me lical practi- 
tioner a license for the possession of opium for medical pur- 
poses only; b) to any person a special permit authorizing 
him for a specified period to have in his possession, for 
private consumption only, a specified quantity of opium in 
excess of feuch maximum quantity a3 the Darbar has under- 
taken to prescribe. 

9. No person shall sell opium without a license to 
this etket, provided that any medical practitioner to whom 
a licence has been granted under Clause 8 may sell opium 
in quantities net exceeding in any one transaction such 
maximum qr antity as the Darbar has undertaken to prescribe 
a* medicine or in medical* preparations. 



opium. 621 

10. No person shall sell opium exceeding such maxi- 
mum quantity as the Darbar his undertaken to prescribe to 
any person not legally authorized to possess the same. 

11. No licensed vendor shall sell m^ra than such ma- 
ximum quantity as the Darbar nas uid^rtakan to prescribe, 
of the inspissated juice of the poppy, or of any preparation 
or admixture thereof, or of any intoxicating drug prepared 
from the poppy or more than 5 seers of poppy-heads, exsept 
to a liejn^ed vendor or a farmer or to a medical practitioner 
or other person holding a special parmib granted by the 
Darbar under Clause 8. 

12. Licenses for the sale of opium shall ba granted 
by the Darbar only; such license shall caatain such conditions 
as the Darbar may think fit to impose. Sach conditions 
may from time to time be varied so as to assimilate them 
to those in force in British territory. 

13. Licenses for sale shall be granted for one year 
only, or the right to sell opium may be farmed for a period 
not exeeding five years. 

14. Any person who, in contravention of these regu- 
lations, (a) cultivates the poppy, (b) manufactures opium, 
(c) possesses opium, {<!) transports opium, (e) imports or 
exports opium, (f) or sells opium, (</) and any person who 
otharwise contravenes such regulations, shall, on conviction 
before any officer duly authorizad by the Durbar, ba punished 
for each 'such offence with imprisonment, either simple or 
rigorous, for a term wiieh miy.exband to one year, or with 
fine which may extend to one thousand rupees, or with both,, 
and where a fine is imposed, th9 convicting ofl&33r shall direab 
the offender to be imprisoned in default of payment) of the 
fine for a term whbh may extmd to six months, ahd such 
imprisonment shall be either simple or rigorous and in excess 
of any other imprisonment to which he may have been 
sentenced. 



622 BIWA KANTHA DIRECTORY. 

15. In prosecutions under the preceding clause, it 
shall be presumed, until the contrary is proved, that all 
opium, for which the accused person is unable to account 
satisfactorily, is opium in respect of which he has committed 
an offence under these regulations. 

16. In any case in which an offence under Clause 14 
has been committed — 

(a) the poppy eo cultivated, 

(b) the opium in respect of which any offence under 
the same clause has been committed, 

(c) where, in the case of an offence under head (d) 

or (e) of the same clause ; the offender is transporting, 
importing or exporting any opium exceeding the quan- 
tity (if any) which he is permitted to transport, import, 
or export, as the case may be, the whole of the opium 
which he is transporting, exporting or importing. 

(d) where, in the case of an offence under Clause (/) 
of the same clause, the offender has in his possession 
any opium other than the opium in respect of which 
the offence has leen committed, the whole of such other 
opium, 

shall be liable to confiscation. 

The vessels, packages and coverings in which any 
opium liable to confiscation under this clause is found and 
the other contents (if any) of the vessel or package in which 
such opium may be concealed, and the animals or the con- 
veyances used in carrying it, shall likewise be liable to 
confiscation, 

17. When the offender is convicted or when the 
person charged with an offence in respect to any opium is 
acquitted, but the officer trying the cas9 decides that the 
opium is liable to confiscation, such confiscations may be 
crc'cred by him. 



OPIUM. 



623 



When an offence against these regulations has been 
committed, bub tho offender is nob knnvu or cannob bs 
found, or when opiu n nob in the possession of any person 
cannot be satisfactorily ac30uufced for, any authorized officer 
may, after due inquiry, order the confiscation of such 
opium. 

18. Opium confiscated under the regulations shall bs 
disposed ot in one of the following ways, viz: — 

{I) It may be retained by the Darbar as part 
of the opium required for consumption within the 
State, the duty leviable in respect of which the British 
* Government has agreed to relinquish, and shall then 
be issued to licensed vendors for sale within the State, 
the price to be charged by the Darbar to the licensed 
vendors to the customers being the same as those 
mentioned respectively in Clauses 4 and 5 of the 
a^reemeut with the British Government; or 

(2) It may be forwarded to the Political Agent 
or Depot with a list of rewards that may be ordered 
to be awarded under Clause 19, and the Political 
Agent, after deducting from the sale proceeds thereof 
the amount of piss fee due on ths quantity of opium 
and paying off the rewards to the persons eonesrneJ, 
will make over the balance (if any )to the D*rbar* 
All other articles so confiscatad shall be disposed of aa 
the Darbar may order. 

19. Any authorizid officer convicting an offender 

under Clause 14, or ordering the confiscation of opiuta 

under Clause 16 of these regaUtiou*, m*y gran!} in such 

proportions as h^ thinks fit, to iafonmrs and any other 

persons who hava contributed to the seizure of the optua 

or the conviction of the offender, a rawari not exsaeling 

the value of the opium and other articles confiscated in the 

case plus the amount of any fine imposed, la all cases, 

except when otherwise expressly ordered by the Darbar 



624 BEWA KANTHA BIRECTOItY. 

concerned, at least one-half the value of the opium and 
other articles confiscated plus the fine realized shall be 
distributed as rewards among the informers and captor3 
concerned. 

20. Any authorized officer may — 

(a) at ary time enter upon, and search, any 
premises on which he has reason to believe opium 
liable to confiscation under these regulations is manu- 
factured, kept, or concealed, and to seize any such 
opium and all materials used in the manufacture 
thereof; 

(b) detain, search and arrest any person whom*he 
has reason to believe to be guilty of any offence rela- 
ting to such opium; 

(c) seize in any open place, or in transit, any 
opium or other thing which he has reason to believe 
to be liable to confiscation under Clause 16 of these 
regulations. 

21. Any State officer who without reasonable ground 
of suspicion enters or searches or causes to be entered or 
searched any building, vessel or place, 

or vexatiously and unnecessarily seizes the property of 
any pe